Administrative Services

Medical and First Aid

  • If serious injury or illness occurs, call OPS at 911 from a campus phone or (309) 298-1949 from a cellular phone.
  • Give your name, describe the medical problems, and provide the campus location of the victim.
    NOTE: OPS has a direct line to paramedics and ambulance service and can render first aid and CPR.
  1. Always determine and report if the person is conscious or unconscious, check for breathing.
  2. In a case of minor injury or illness, provide first aid care from first aid kit, if those materials are located in your building.
  3. In case of serious injury or illness, quickly perform the following steps:
  • Keep victim still and comfortable. DO NOT MOVE VICTIM UNLESS FOR LIFE SAFETY.
  • If the victim is conscious inquire about their injury.
  • When reporting the emergency to OPS (309 298 1949) stay on the telephone until released by OPS dispatch so they may obtain all  necessary information.
  • Look for emergency medical ID, question witnesses, and give all information to OPS when they arrive. Assist OPS as directed.
  • Be sure to restock first aid kits as materials are used.

 

      In all cases below, instruct someone to call OPS at 911 from a campus phone and at 309 298 1949 from a cellular phone while administering first aid. If you are alone call OPS and then administer first aid as appropriate. Assist OPS as directed when they arrive.
 

     Basic Life Support

  CPR

          Hands-Only CPR

  1. Send someone to Call OPS, 911 from campus phone or 309 298 1949 from cell phone, and to bring an AED. If alone Call 911 yourself and get an AED if available nearby.
  2. Expose chest. Pump hard and fast in the center of the chest. Let chest fully rise after each compression.
  3. Continue until.
  • An AED is brought to the scene and is ready to use.
  • Professional help or another person arrives and takes over.

 

  Conventional CPR 

  1. Check for responsiveness by tapping the victim on the shoulder and shouting, "Are you OK?" Note if the victim is not breathing or not breathing normally (gasping).
  2. Send someone to Call OPS at 911 from a campus phone or 309 298 1949 from a cell phone, and to bring an AED. If alone, Call OPS first and retrieve an AED if nearby.
  3. Expose the chest. Put the heel of your hand on the breastbone, second hand on top of the first and interlock the fingers in the center of the chest for chest compressions.
  4. Give 30 chest compressions hard and fast at least 2 inches deep at a rate of at least 100 per minute. Count aloud for a steady rate: "1, 2, 3....."
  5. Open the airway by tilting the head back and lifting the chin.
  6. Give 2 breaths over 1 second each to produce visible chest rise.
  7. Continue cycles of 30 compressions and 2 breaths. If the victim may have been choking, look inside the mouth when opening it to give breaths and remove any objects with your fingers.
  8. Continue CPR until:

          -The victim wakes up.

          -An AED is brought to the scene and is ready to use.

          -Professional help or another CPR trained person arrives and takes over.

   9.  a. When an AED arrives, start the AED sequence.

        b. If the victim is breathing normally but is unresponsive, put him or her in a recovery position and monitor breathing.

 

   Using an AED

  • Give CPR until an AED (automated external defibrillator) is brought to the scene and is ready to use. When the AED is ready, follow the steps below.
  • If you arrive with an AED at a victim who is not breathing or not breathing normally (gasping), use the AED immediately before starting CPR.
  • For a infant or child under age 8, use a unit with pediatric pads if available, applied as directed by the unit. If unavailable use adult pads.
  1. Place the unit by the victim's shoulder and turn it on.
  2. Expose the victim's chest and quickly dry or shave the pad placement area if necessary.
  3. Apply pads to the victim's chest. If needed, plug the cables into the unit.
  4. Stand clear during rhythm analysis.
  5. Follow prompts from the AED unit to take 1 of 3 actions: (1) press the shock button, (2) stay clear while the AED automatically delivers a shock or, (3) do not shock but immediately give CPR with remaining in place, starting with chest compressions. 
  6. Stand clear when AED prompts to analyze the rhythm again after 5 cycles of CPR (about 2 minutes)
  7. Continue steps 5 and 6 until the victim wakes up or professional rescuers arrive and take over.
  8. If the victim is breathing normally but is unresponsive, put the victim in the recover position (with pads remaining in place) and continue to monitor the breathing.

 

    Choking-Responsive Adult or Child

  1. If the victim is coughing forcefully, encourage continued coughing to clear object. If not coughing, ask the victim if he or she is choking. A person who cannot cough, speak or breath is choking and needs help immediately. Have someone Call OPS from a campus phone by dialing 911 or 309 298 1949 from a cell phone.
  2. Ask if you can help. Tell the victim you will use abdominal thrusts (the Heimlich maneuver).
  3. Stand behind the victim with one leg forward between the victim's legs. For a child, move down to the child's level.
  4. Reach around the abdomen and locate the person's naval with a finger from one hand.
  5. Make a fist with the other hand and place the thumb side of the fist against the person's abdomen just about the navel.
  6. Grasp your fist with you other hand and thrust inward and upward into the victim's abdomen with quick jerks. Continue abdominal thrusts until the victim expels the object or becomes unresponsive.
  7. If the victim becomes unresponsive, lower the person to the ground, expose the chest and start CPR by pumping the chest 30 times hard and fast. Look inside the mouth when opening the airways to give breaths and remove any object.
  8. For a responsive pregnant victim or any victim you cannot get your arms around or cannot effectively give abdominal thrust to, give chest thrust instead of abdominal thrust. Avoid squeezing the ribs with your arms.

 

     Alcohol Overdose

  1. Check for injuries or illness. Do not assume alcohol is the factor involved. Note that victims with uncontroled diabetes may seem intoxicated.
  2. For a responsive intoxicated person:

          a. Stay with the person and protect him or her from injury (take away car keys).         

          b. Do not let victim lay down on his or her back. 

   3. For an unresponsive intoxicated person:              

         a. Put an unresponsive, breathing victim in the recovery position. Be prepared for vomiting.

         b. Monitor the victim's breathing and give CPR if needed.            

         c. Call OPS from a campus phone by dialing 911, from a cell phone by dialing 309 298 1949, if the victim's breathing is irregular, if   seizures occur or the victim cannot be roused (coma).     

         d. Protect an intoxicated person from hypothermia.

 

   Allergic Reaction (Severe)

   >>> Immediate medical help is needed.

 A severe allergic reaction is life threatening. Common causes include certain drugs such as penicillin, certain foods such as peanuts and shellfish,     certain substances such as latex, and insect stings and bites.

Signs and symptoms: difficulty breathing, wheezing, tightness in throat or chest, swelling of the face and neck, puffy eyes, anxiety or agitation, nausea, vomiting or changing levels of responsiveness.

  1. Call OPS by dialing 911 on a campus phone or dialing 309 298 1949 from a cellular phone.
  2. Help responsive victim use his or her emergency epinephrine kit such as a EpiPen auto-injector or an Ana-Kit. If the victim cannot use the prescribed EPIPen auto-injector, you may administer it yourself if permitted by state law.
  • Take the EPiPen out of its case and remove the cap.
  • To administer the medication, jab the pen tip into the outer thigh and hold it there for 10 seconds while the medication is injected.
  • The medication should provide relief for 15-20 minutes.

   3. Monitor the victim's breathing and be ready to give CPR if needed.

   4. Help a responsive victim sit up in a position of easiest breathing in the recovery position. Put an unresponsive victim who is breathing in the recovery position.

 

   Angina

  The chest pain of angina usually happens after intense activity or exertion, is recognized as angina by the victim, and last only a few minutes.

  1. Ask if the person has been diagnosed with angina and if the pain is line angina pain experienced in the past. if so, help the person take his or her own medication and rest.
  2. If the pain persists more than 10 minutes or stops and then returns, or if the victim has other heart attack symptoms not relieved by rest, give first aid for a Heart Attack.

 

Asthma

  • Signs and symptoms: wheezing, difficulty breathing and speaking, dry persistent cough, fear or anxiety, gray-blue or ashen skin or changing levels of responsiveness.
  1. If the victim does not know he or she has asthma (first attack), Call OPS at 911 on campus phone or 309 298 1949 on a cellular phone.
  2. If the victim identifies the breathing difficulty as an asthma attack and has been prescribed medication (usually an inhaler), help the victim use the medication.
  • Remove the cap.
  • Shake the inhaler several times.
  • Connect the spacer (if needed).
  • The victim places the inhaler or spacer end in mouth.
  • The victim presses the applicator down while slowly inhaling.
  • Remind the victim to hold his/her breath with the medication for about 10 seconds.

   3. Help the victim rest in a position for easiest breathing (usually sitting up).

   4. If needed, the victim may use the inhaler again as prescribed or directed by his or her medical provider. if the breathing difficulty persist   after use of the inhaler, Call OPS at 911 on campus phone or 309 298 1949 from cellular phone.

 

  Bee or Wasp Sting

  1. Remove stinger from skin by scraping it away gently with a piece of plastic such as a credit card (not a knife blade).
  2. Call OPS at 911 on a campus phone or 309 298 1949 from a cellular phone if the victim has a known allergy to stings.
  3. Wash the area with soap and water.

Bleeding

  • If severe bleeding is occuring, shout for someone to call OPS at 911 on a campus phone or 309 298 1949 from cellular phone.
  1. Put on medical exam gloves or keep a barrier (dressing, plastic bag) between you and the blood.
  2. Put a sterile dressing or clean cloth on the wound.
  3. Push on the wound with your gloved hand as hard as needed for about 5 minutes.
  4. Reevaluate the bleeding. If it continues, put another dressing or cloth pad on top of the first and keep applying pressure.
  5. If needed, apply a pressure bandage to keep pressure on the wound, wrapping from the end of the extremity toward the center of the body. (Tourniquet should only be used as an extreme last resort by rescuers trained in their use because of the high risk of complications.
  6. If severe bleeding is occuring, treat the victim for shock.
  7. See a health care provider immediately for:
  • Bleeding not easily controlled.
  • Deep or large wounds.
  • Significant face wounds.
  • Possible wound infection.
  • Animal or human bite.
  • Object in the wound.
  • Tetanus vaccination if needed.
  • Wounds that may need stitches.

  8. Minor wounds may be cleaned, dressed and bandaged.

  Breathing Difficulty 

     >>> Immediate medical help is needed!    

  • Signs and symptoms:  gasping or unable to catch one's breath, speaking in shortened sentences, very fast or very slow breathing, very deep or shallow breathing, wheezing or gurgling with breathing, dizziness or lightheadedness, or pale or ashen skin.
  1. Call OPS at 911 from a campus phone or 309 298 1949 from a cellular phone for sudden unexplained breathing problems.
  2. Help the victim rest in a position of easiest breathing. Calm and reassure the victim.
  3. If the victim is hyperventilating, ask him or her to breathe slowly.
  4. Ask the victim about any prescribed medicine he or she may have and help the victim take it if needed.
  5. Stay with the victim and be prepared to give CPR if breathing stops.

 

   Broken Bones and Dis-locations

   Call OPS by dialing 911 from a campus phone or dialing 309 298 1949 from a cellular phone  for a large bone fracture or any dislocation (except a the hand or finger).

   Use the RICE acronym for fractures, sprains and dislocations:

  1. R - Rest the injured area. Support and do not move the injured area.
  2. I -  Ice. Place a plastic bag or damp cloth with an ice-water mix on the injured area to reduce swelling and pain; put a barrier such as a cloth between the plastic bag and the skin. A cold pack also can be used. Apply the cold for 20 minutes (or 10 minutes if it produces discomfort), then remove it for 30 minutes. Repeat the process for 24 to 48 hours or until the victim receives medical help.
  3. C - Compress the injury in an extremity with a elastic roller bandage. the bandage can be placed over the ice-water bag.
  4. E - Elevate an injured extremity. (A sling may be used for arm injures).

  Splinting

  Splint an injury if help will be delayed and there is a risk of the injured area moving. Splint an injury of the hand or foot if the victim is to be   transported to the hospital in a personal vehicle.

  • Dress open wounds before splinting.
  • Splint only if it does not cause more pain for the victim.
  • Splint the injury in the position found.
  • Immobilize the entire area. Splint the joints above and below the injured area.

 

   Burns - Heat  

   First and Second - Degree Burns

  First - degree burns: skin is red, dry and painful; swelling; skin is not broken.

  Second -degree burns: skin is swollen and red; skin may be blotchy or streaked; blisters are present and possibly weeping clear fluid; pain is significant.

  1. Stop the burning by removing the heat source.
  2. Immediately cool the burn with cold running tap water until area is free from pain when removed from water. (Do not put ice on a burn, which would cause tissue damage).
  3. Remove constricting items such as clothing and jewelry.
  4. For a large second - degree burns. Call OPS from a campus phone by dialing 911 or from a cellular phone by dialing 309 298 1949.
  5. Protect the burn area from friction or pressure. Put a nonstick dressing over the burn to protect the area, btu keep it loose and do not tape it to the skin.
  6. Keep burn blisters intact. This reduces pain and improves healing by preventing infection.
  7. Seek medical attention for burns on the face, genitals, hands or feet.

  Third - Degree Burns  

 Signs and symptoms: damaged, charred or white leathery skin. Watch also for signs and symptoms of shock: clammy, pale or ashen skin; nausea and vomiting; fast breathing.

  1. Stop the burning by removing the heat source.
  2. Immediately cool the burn with cold running tap water until area is free from pain even after removal from water. (Do not put ice on a burn, which would cause tissue injury). Do not attempt to cool the burn with cold water if it is larger than 20% of the body (e.g., 1 whole leg or torso from neck to waist) or 10% for a child because of the risk of hypothermia and shock.
  3. Remove clothing and jewelry before the area swells.
  4. Call OPS by dialing 911 on a campus phone or by dialing 309 298 1949 on a cellular phone. 
  5. Treat for shock; have victim lie back, elevate legs if no trauma and maintain normal body temperature. 
  6. Carefully cover the burn with a nonstick dressing; keep it loose and do not tape to skin; do not apply cream or ointment.
  7. Do not give the victim anything to drink.
  8. Watch the victim's breathing and be ready to give CPR if needed.

 

     Chemical Burns 

  1. Check the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for chemical involved.
  2. Move the victim away from fumes or ventilate the area.
  3. With a gloved hand or piece of cloth, brush off any dry chemical.
  4. Remove clothing and jewelry from the burn area.
  5. Flush the entire area as quickly as possible with large amounts of running water. Flush until EMS personnel arrive to give definitive care or until a toxic - specific solution is available.
  6. Call OPS at 911 from a campus phone or 309 298 1949 from a cellular phone.

 

    Diabetic Emergencies 

   Signs and symptoms of low blood sugar: 

  • Sudden dizziness, shakiness or mood change (even combativeness).
  • Headache, confusion, difficulty paying attention.
  • Pale skin, sweating.
  • Hunger.
  • Clumsy, jerky movements.
  • Possible seizure.
  1. Confirm victim has diabetes. talk to the victim; look for a medical ID tag.
  2. Give the victim sugar: 3 glucose tablets, 1/2 cup fruit juice, 1 or 2 sugar packets (but not artificial sugar or sweetener packets) or 5 to 6 pieces of hard candy. If the victim still feels ill or has signs and symptoms after 15 minutes, give more sugar.
  3. Call OPS at 911 from a campus phone or 309 298 1949 from a cellular phone, if the victim becomes unresponsive or continues to have significant signs and symptoms.

     Signs and symptoms of high blood sugar:

  • Frequent urination.
  • Drowsiness.
  • Dry mouth, thirst.
  • Shortness of breath, deep rapid breathing.
  • Nausea, vomiting.
  • Eventual unresponsiveness.
  1. High blood sugar is a medical emergency. If you suspect high blood sugar, Call OPS at 911 on a campus phone or 309 298 1949 on a cellular phone immediately and monitor the person.
  2. If you are unsure whether the victim suffers from high or low blood sugar, it is okay to give sugar.
  3. Call OPS at 911 from campus phone or  309 298 1949 from cellular phone if victim becomes unresponsive or continues to have significant signs and symptoms.

 

    Drug Overdose 

   >>> Immediate medical help is needed!  

  1. Put a breathing, unresponsive victim in the recovery position and be ready to give CPR if needed. Call OPS at 911 on a campus phone or by 309 298 1949 on a cellular phone.
  2. Try to find out what drug was taken. If you see evidence of an overdose call OPS.
  3. If symptoms are minor and you know what substance was taken, call the Poison Control Center (800-222-1222) and follow its instructions.
  4. Check the victim for any injuries requiring care.
  5. Do not try to induce vomiting, which may cause further harm and is unlikely to help the victim.

 

   Fainting 

  1. Check the victim's breathing and be read to give CPR if needed.
  2. Lay the victim down on his or her back and raise the legs 6 to 12 inches. Loosen constricting clothing.
  3. Check for injuries.
  4. Call OPS at 911 from a campus phone or 309 298 1949 from a cellular phone if victim does not regain responsiveness soon or faints repeatedly. Also Call OPS for all older adults, people with heart disease and pregnant women. 

 

   Frostbite   

   Signs and symptoms: skin looks waxy and white, gray, yellow or bluish; skin feels numb, tingly or aching. 

  1. Move the victim out of the cold and into a warm place. 
  2. Remove wet clothing and constricting items.
  3. Protect between fingers and toes with dry gauze.
  4. Seek medical attention as soon as possible.
  5. Warm the frostbitten area in lukewarm water (99-104 F or 37-40 C) for 20 to 30 minutes only if medical care will be delayed and if there is no danger of the skin refreezing.
  6. Protect and elevate the area. 

 

   Heart Attack  

    >>> Immediate medical help is needed !  

      Signs and symptoms:  

  • Persistent discomfort, pain or pressure in chest.
  • Pain that may spread to neck, jaw, shoulder or arm.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Dizziness, lightheadedness, feeling or impending doom.
  • Pale skin, sweating.
  • Victims having a heart attack may not have all these signs and symptoms.
  • Women especially may experience other symptoms, including shortness of breath, indigestion, nausea or vomiting, and back or jaw pain.
  1. Call OPS at 911 from a campus phone or 309 298 1949 from a cellular phone for any victim experiencing chest discomfort, even if the victim says it is not serious.
  2. Help the victim rest in a comfortable position. Loosen constricting clothing.
  3. Ask the victim if he or she is taking heart medication and help obtain the medication. Follow the direction on the medication.
  4. Encourage the victim to chew one uncoated adult or 2 low-dose baby aspirin unless he or she is allergic to aspirin or cannot take aspirin for any other reason.
  5. Stay with the victim and be reassuring and calming.
  6. Be ready to give CPR if needed.
  7. Do not let the victim eat or drink anything (including water).

 

     Heatstroke  

    >>> Immediate medical help is needed!  

    Signs and symptoms: skin is flushed and very hot to the touch; sweating has usually stopped; fast breathing; headache, dizziness, confusion, irrational behavior; possible convulsions or unresponsiveness.

  1. Call OPS on a campus phone by dialing 911 or by dialing 309 298 1949 on a cellular phone. 
  2. Move the victim to a cool place.
  3. Remove outer clothing. 
  4. Immediately cool the victim with any means at hand, preferably by immersing the victim up to the neck in cold water (with the help of a second rescuer). Other methods include wrapping the victim in a wet sheet kept wet, sponging the victim with cold water, spraying the skin with water and fanning the area, or applying ice bags or cold packs beside the neck, armpits and groin.
  5. Do not give the victim and beverage containing caffeine or alcohol. If the victim is nauseous, vomiting or has diminished mental status, do not give any fluids.
  6. Monitor the victim's breathing and be ready to give CPR if needed.

 

  Hypothermia 

  >>> Immediate medical help is needed! 

 Hypothermia can occur whenever and wherever the victim feels cold, including indoors. If can occur gradually or quickly, and can become life-threatening.

Signs and symptoms: uncontrollable shivering (may have stopped in severe cases); lethargy, confusion, drowsiness, irrational behavior; clumsy movements; pale or ashen, cool skin (even under clothing) slow breathing; changing levels of responsiveness.

  1. Check responsiveness and breathing and Call OPS at 911 from a campus phone or 309 298 1949 from a cellular phone. Except in mild cases, the victim needs immediate medical care.
  2. Provide CPR if unresponsive and not breathing normally.
  3. Quickly move the victim out of the cold. remove any wet clothing.
  4. Warm the victim with blankets or warm clothing.
  5. Only if the victim is far from medical care, use active rewarming by putting the victim near a heat source and putting warm water in containers against the skin.
  6. Do not rub or massage the victim's skin. Be very gentle when handling the victim.
  7. Give warm (not hot) drinks to an alert victim who can easily swallow, but do not give alcohol or caffeine.
  8. Monitor breathing and be ready to give CPR if needed.

 

  Poisoning - Inhaled 

 >>> Immediate medical help is needed!  

 Signs and symptoms of carbon monoxide or other inhaled poison: headache, dizziness, lightheadedness, confusion, weakness; nausea, vomiting, chest pain, convulsions; changing levels of responsiveness. 

  1. Immediately move the victim into fresh air.
  2. Call OPS at 911 from a campus phone or 309 298 1949 from a cellular phone even if the victim starts to recover.
  3. Monitor the victim's breathing and be ready to give CPR if needed.
  4. Put an unresponsive breathing victim in the recovery position. 
  5. Loosen tight clothing around the neck or chest.

 

   Poisoning - Swallowed 

  >>> Immediate medical help is needed! 

   Signs and symptoms:  nausea and vomiting, abdominal pain or cramps; drowsiness, dizziness, disorientation; changing levels of responsiveness.

  1. Determine what was swallowed, when and how much.
  2. For a responsive victim, call the Poison Control Center (800 222 1222) immediately and follow its instructions.
  3. For a victim with signs of a life-threatening condition and for any unresponsive victim, Call OPS at 911 from a campus phone or 309 298 1949 from a cellular phone. 
  4. Put an unresponsive breathing victim in the recovery position. Be prepared for vomiting. Monitor the victim's breathing and be ready to give CPR if needed.
  5. Do not give the victim any substance to eat or drink unless instructed to do so by the Poison Control Center. Do not follow first air instructions present on some household product labels; follow the Poison Control Center's instructions.
  6. If a responsive victim's mouth or lips are burned by a corrosive chemical, rinse the mouth with cold water (but do not allow the victim to swallow). 

 

    Seizure 

  1. Do not try to stop the person's movements or restrain the person. Do not place any objects in the person's mouth.
  2. Prevent injury during a seizure by moving away dangerous objects and putting soft padding such as a jacket under the person's head. Remove eyeglasses.
  3. Loosen tight clothing around the neck to ease breathing.
  4. After the seizure, ensure the victim's airway remains open with the recovery position or head tilt if needed. Gently turn the person onto one side if vomiting occurs.
  5. Call OPS at 911 from a campus phone or 309 298 1949 from a cellular phone if the seizure last more than 5 minutes; if the person is not known to have epilepsy; if the person recovers very slowly, has trouble breathing or has another seizure; if the person is pregnant; is wearing a medical ID bracelet; or if the person is injured.

 

    Shock 

    >>> Immediate medical help is needed.  

   Signs and symptoms: anxiety, confusion, agitation or restlessness; dizziness, lightheadedness, cool, clammy or sweating skin, pale bluish or ashen in color, rapid, shallow breathing; thirst, nausea, vomiting: changing levels of responsiveness. 

  1. Check for responsiveness, normal breathing, and severe bleeding or injuries.
  2. Call OPS at 911 at a campus phone or 309 298 1949 from a cellular phone and be ready to give CPR if needed.
  3. Care first for life-threatening conditions such as severe bleeding.
  4. Position a responsive victim on his or her back using a blanket or coat as a pad. if there is no evidence of trauma, raise the legs such that the feet are 6 - 12 inches above the ground. Put a breathing unresponsive victim (if no suspected spinal injury) in the recovery position.
  5. Loosen any tight clothing.
  6. Be alert for the possibility of vomiting: turn the victim's head to drain the mouth.
  7. Try to maintain the victim's normal body temperature. if necessary, maintain the victim's body heat with a blanket or coat over the victim.
  8. Do not let a shock victim eat, drink or smoke.
  9. Stay with the victim and offer reassurance and comfort.

 

   Stroke  

  >>> Immediate medical help is needed!  

  Most common signs and symptoms:  numbness; sudden weakness or numbness of face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body; drooling, facial droop, slurred speech and gait problems.

  Some stroke victims may have: sudden, severe headache; vomiting; loss of consciousness. 

  1. Call OPS at 911 from a campus phone or 309 298 1949 from a cellular phone. 
  2. Monitor the victim's breathing and be ready to give CPR if needed.
  3. Have the victim lie on his or her back with head and shoulders slightly raised.
  4. Loosen constricting clothing.
  5. If necessary, turn the victim's head to the side to allow drool or vomit to drain.
  6. Keep the victim warm and quiet until help arrives.
  7. Put a breathing, unresponsive victim in the recovery position.

 

   Wound Care 

  1. Wash your hands and put on gloves if available.
  2. Gently wash shallow wounds and abrasions with large amounts of warm or room-temperature water with or without soap to remove dirt.
  3. Irrigate a deeper wound under large amounts of running water to remove foreign matter.
  4. Do not use alcohol, hydrogen peroxide or iodine on wound.
  5. Pat area dry.
  6. Apply antibiotic ointment only to an abrasion or superficial wound and only if the victim is not allergic to the antibiotic.
  7. Cover the wound with a sterile dressing and bandage.
  8. Seek medical attention for these wounds:
  • If the victim's tetanus vaccination is out of date.
  • The wound may be infected.
  • A deep or puncture wound.
  • An impaled object.
  • A wound may require stitches (cuts on the face or hands when the edges do not close together, gaping wounds and cuts longer than 1 inch.

 

     (Reprinted with permission from NSC First Aid Quick Guide, copyright 2011 National Safety Council )