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2005 - 2006 Student Assessment Undergraduate Summaries
College of Education & Human Services

Department of Community Health/Health Services Management:-B.S. in Community Health
Department of Community Health/Health Services Management:-B.S. in Health Services Management
Department of Curriculum and Instruction-B.S. in Education with a major in elementary education, no option
Department of Curriculum and Instruction-B.S. in Education with a major in elementary education, ECH option
Department of Dietetics, Fashion Merchandising, and Hospitality
Department of Education and Interdisciplinary Studies: Bilingual Education
Department of Instructional Technology and Telecommunications
Department of Kinesiology
Department of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration
Department of Recreation, Park, and Tourism Administration
Department of Social Work
Department of Special Education

Major Assessment Results, 2005-2006
College of Education & Human Services

The purpose of this report is to describe the assessment plans as well as the current results of major assessment for 2005-2006. Department results are reported in alphabetical order.

Department: Community Health/Health Services Management: - B.S. in Community Health

Learning Outcomes: Students will;

  1. Assess individual and community needs for health education;
  2. Plan effective health education programs;
  3. Evaluate effectiveness of health education programs;
  4. Coordinate provision of health education services;
  5. Act as a resource person in health education;
  6. Communicate health and health education needs, concerns, and resources(multiple competencies and sub-competencies listed for each learning outcome)

Direct and Indirect Measurement: none specified.

Results:

  1. Students and faculty presented three research papers and posters at the following professional meetings: Illinois Public Health Association, Illinois School Health Association, and the 14th Annual Illinois HIV/STD Conference;
  2. During this review period, 95 percent of B.S. in Community Health students rated the internship experience as good or excellent;
  3. Eighty percent of Community Health Program students completed their major courses during AY 2005-2006 with a grade of “B” or higher;
  4. During AY 2005-2006, internship supervisors rated the health students as well above average in preparation. Supervisors rated students highest regarding degree to which assignments were completed, quality of assignments completed, creativity, and relationships with fellow workers.

Feedback Loop: Department has recently created detailed student learning outcomes and standards of success for all courses in the B.S. in Community Health major; developed a qualitative evaluation to assess the internship process (summative evaluation); and developed and implement an alumni survey to be administered Fall Semester 2006.

Department: Community Health/Health Services Management-B.S. in Health Services Management

Learning Outcomes:
Content/disciplinary knowledge & skills;

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of theoretical basis of business, law, organizational behavior, organizational design and strategic management as they apply to the structuring, marketing, positioning, and governing of health organizations;
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of changing population demographics in the United States, and the impact of those changes on the organization, delivery and financing of healthcare;
  3. Analyze government health policy formulation, implementation, and evaluation;
  4. Demonstrate skills in managing human resources in diverse healthcare care organizations;
  5. Demonstrate basic statistical skills needed to evaluate research data and quantify the impact of actions related to delivery of quality health care.

Critical thinking skill;

  1. Assess quality of both business practices and health care delivery focusing on outcomes measurements, process/outcome relationships, and methods for process improvement;
  2. Apply legal and ethical analysis to business related decisions;
  3. Demonstrate ethical behavior and professional accountability in all interactions with employers, colleagues, and health care clients; and
  4. Establish goals for future personal and professional growth through commitment to lifelong learning.

Communication skills:

  1. Demonstrate effective, written and oral communication skills;
  2. Develop and execute professional presentation;
  3. Utilize health information technology effectively and efficiently; and
  4. Develop and demonstrate skills in leadership, interpersonal relations, conflict resolution, and change management.

Direct and Indirect Measurement: none listed.

Results: Internship supervisors rated the health services management students as well above average in preparation and work skills. During this review period, 90 percent of B.S. in Community Health students rated the internship experience as good or excellent. Eighty percent of Health Services Management program students completed their major courses during AY 2005-2006 with a grade of “B” or higher.

Feedback Loop: to be discussed.

Department: Curriculum and Instruction- Bachelor of Science in Education with a major in elementary education, no option

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Undergraduate elementary education candidates will demonstrate their knowledge of content, including knowledge to teach English Language Arts, Science, Social Studies, and Mathematics;
  2. Undergraduate elementary education candidates will plan effective instruction;
  3. Undergraduate elementary education candidates will successfully implement instruction; and
  4. Undergraduate elementary education candidates will demonstrate effects on student learning in the elementary classroom.

Direct and Indirect Measurement:
Direct Measures: Candidates complete the Illinois Certification Test in Elementary Education prior to student teaching. Information about candidates’ content knowledge is also obtained through course exams and projects. Candidates create lesson plans in each methods course, the pre-student teaching experience, and student teaching. Candidates’ ability to implement instruction is evaluated by department faculty during the pre-student teaching field experiences. Work samples are completed during the field experience and student teaching, providing information about the candidates’ ability to demonstrate effects on elementary student learning.

Indirect Measure: Candidates complete the survey during the student teaching semester.

Results:

Outcome 1: All of the averaged scores are above the required 240 points needed to pass the test, except for the Fall 2005 Social Studies Score. Scores for Science are the highest, while those for Social Studies are the lowest.

Outcome 2: At least 93% of Fall 2005 and Spring 2006 elementary education majors demonstrated the ability to create instruction that reflects a balanced reading approach. During one semester, 63% of RDG 383 candidates in Macomb and WIU-QC campuses earned “target” levels of achievement during the evaluation of their ability to plan balanced reading instruction. While the percentage of candidates completing RDG 384 achieving a “target” level for creating balanced reading instruction was significantly lower than those in RDG 383, fewer “unacceptable” ratings were earned.

At least 76% of candidates in RDG 383 received “acceptable” or “target” ratings of their ability to create instruction that develops elementary students’ comprehension skills and strategies. The percentage of RDG 383 candidates earning an “unacceptable” rating of their ability to plan comprehension instruction increased during Spring 2006. As candidates completed the second literacy course (RDG 384), the percentage who were not able to create effective comprehension instruction decreased. In fact, 87% of RDG 384 candidates were able to create appropriate instruction to develop elementary students’ abilities to comprehend text.

At least 74% of the candidates in RDG 383 were able to plan appropriate writing instruction. The percentage of RDG 383 candidates earning an “unacceptable” rating in their ability to plan writing instruction increased during Spring 2006. Eighty-two percent of candidates completing RDG 384 were able to develop writing instruction at the “acceptable” or “target” level. Fewer candidates in RDG 384 received “unacceptable” ratings as they developed writing instruction in their second literacy methods course.

At least 96% of the candidates in Macomb were able to plan effective math instruction that is achievable, meaningful, and motivating. The percentage of Macomb students earning a “target” rating increased during Spring 2006. While 18% of WIU-QC candidates received an “unacceptable” rating of their ability to plan appropriate math instruction in Fall 2005, all candidates earned an “acceptable” or “target” rating in Spring 2006.

At least 83% of the candidates in the first science methods course (SCED 364) planned appropriate science instruction which successfully engaged elementary students in inquiry. The percentage of Macomb candidates earning “acceptable” or “target” ratings increased in Spring, while this percentage decreased at the WIU-QC campus.

Candidates planned social studies instruction in two courses. At least 95% of candidates in Macomb and WIU-QC were able to create instruction in SSED 365 that enabled elementary students to develop an understanding of a Native American culture. At least 94% of candidates in SSED 495 were able to create instruction that promoted the development of understandings about global interactions and their cultural complexities.

Outcome 3: In 2005-2006, 98% of the candidates on the Macomb and WIU-QC campuses completing the pre-student teaching field experience successfully implemented a balanced literacy approach that included a focus on phonemic awareness and/or phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension within a literature rich instructional setting. One hundred percent of candidates in Macomb and 85% of those on the WIU-QC campus earned an “acceptable” or “target” rating for their teaching of mathematics in elementary classrooms. Ninety-five percent of all candidates were able to clearly explain and demonstrate science concepts and scientific processes as they taught science. All candidates were able to clearly explain the themes and major concepts from the social studies as they implemented instruction in their field experiences. The percentage of candidates earning “target” ratings increased in literacy, math, science, and social studies during Spring 2006.

Candidates completed a survey during student teaching asking them to reflect on their level of confidence and the extent to which they were prepared to teach core subjects in elementary and middle grade classrooms. They felt most prepared to teach math in grades K-3, science, and reading in grades 2-6 and least prepared to teach math in grades 4-6.

Outcome 4: In Fall 2005, candidates created a teacher work sample during ELED 470 (Pre-Student Teaching Field Experience) which required them to demonstrate the effects of their teaching on student learning. In Spring 2006, this same group of candidates completed a similar teacher work sample in student teaching (ELED 410). (The Fall 2005 410 candidates took ELED 470 in Spring 2005.)

Macomb candidates received more “target” ratings of their performance in two of the three competencies needed to document effects on student learning (creating assessments aligned with objectives and evaluating the effectiveness of their teaching) in student teaching than in the pre-student teaching. This growth, however, was not apparent in their ability to implement appropriate assessments. One hundred percent of WIU-QC candidates received “acceptable” ratings of their ability to create assessments aligned with objectives in both teaching experiences. Growth from pre-student teaching to student teaching was evident in candidates’ abilities to evaluate the effectiveness of their teaching with a significantly greater percentage earning a “target” evaluation. Student teachers (ELED 410) received slightly more “unacceptable” evaluations of their ability to implement assessments than pre-student teachers (ELED 470).

Overall, Spring 2006 candidates in ELED 470 and ELED 410 on both campuses were more successful in demonstrating effects on student learning than candidates enrolled in these course in Fall 2005.

Feedback Loop:

Changes planned in reaction to 2005-2006 assessment data: Literacy and Social Studies faculty will examine the extent to which the test objectives for the Illinois Certification Test for Elementary Education are adequately addressed in the courses in these content areas. Course content and/or course assignments will be revised in an effort to increase these subarea scores. Changes in these scores may be apparent in Spring 2007; however, it is more likely that higher scores would not be apparent until 2007-2008. Faculty will examine the course content and assignments in RDG 383 related to teaching comprehension and writing skills and strategies in Grades K-3 and make appropriate revisions in these areas to decrease the number of “unacceptable” ratings in these areas. Science faculty will examine the course content and assignments and make revisions, if appropriate, to increase the percentage of candidates reaching a target level in their ability to plan science instruction. Math faculty will examine the course content and assignments in Math 364 and Math 366 to increase the extent to which candidates feel prepared to teach mathematics in grades 4-6. Candidates completing student teaching in 2006-2007 may have already completed at least one of these math courses. Therefore, an increase in the number of candidates indicating a higher level of preparedness may not be apparent until 2007-2008. Faculty will continue to explore strategies for improving the ability of student teachers to document their effectiveness in demonstrating effects on student learning.

Changes implemented from 2004-2005 assessment data: Changes in course content in RDG 383 resulted in a 10% decrease in the number of candidates who only felt somewhat prepared to teach beginning readers. Changes in course content in Math 364 and Math 366 decreased the number of candidates who only feel somewhat prepared to teach math in grades 4-8 by three percent. Faculty provided greater support for ELED 410 candidates as they completed the work sample during student teaching. This support decreased the percentage of candidates earning “unacceptable” ratings on the assessment of the work sample. Thus, candidates grew in their ability to effectively document student learning as they moved from pre-student teaching (ELED 470) to student teaching (ELED 410).

Department: Curriculum and Instruction- Bachelor of Science in Education with a major in elementary education, ECH option

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Undergraduate early childhood education candidates will demonstrate their knowledge of early childhood content, including knowledge of language and literacy development; learning across the curriculum, and diversity, collaboration and professionalism;
  2. Undergraduate early childhood education candidates will plan effective instruction;
  3. Undergraduate early childhood education candidates will successfully implement instruction; and
  4. Undergraduate early childhood education candidates will demonstrate the effects of their teaching on young children’s learning. 

Direct and Indirect Measurement: Candidates complete the Illinois Certification Test in Early Childhood Education prior to student teaching. Information about candidates’ content knowledge is also obtained through the implementation of course exams and completion of required course projects which are included in the portfolio. Candidates create lesson plans in methods courses, the pre-student teaching experience, and student teaching. Candidates’ ability to implement instruction is evaluated by department faculty and mentor teachers during the pre-student teaching field experiences. Work samples are completed during the field experience and student teaching, providing information about the candidates’ ability to demonstrate effects on young children’s learning.

Results:

Outcome 1: The average score in each of the three subareas of the certification test is above the required 240 points needed to pass the test. Candidates’ scores are highest in the subarea of Diversity, Collaboration and Professionalism and lowest in Language and Literacy Development. While the certification test scores suggest a relative weakness in the area of Language and Literacy Development, the portfolio review indicates that candidates have an adequate understanding of this content. Candidates also meet expectations for understanding characteristics and needs of young children.

Outcome 2: In Fall 2005, candidates created a teacher work sample during ECH 480 (Pre-Student Teaching Field Experience) which included plans for instruction. In Spring 2006, this same group of candidates completed a teacher work sample during student teaching (ECH 410) which also included instructional plans. The data indicate that 5% of ECH 480 candidates were unable to (1) identify appropriate learning goals, and (2) design instruction for specific learning goals, student characteristics and needs, and learning contexts. However, during the initial weeks of student teaching, these candidates improved their ability to apply these skills in their instruction. Thirty-three percent were able to at least partially meet the criteria for identifying appropriate learning goals, while 67% of the candidates fully demonstrated this competency. Thirteen percent of candidates were able to at least partially meet the criteria for designing instruction for specific learning goals, student characteristics and needs, and learning contexts, and 87% fully met the requirements for demonstrating this competency. The number of candidates who fully met expectations for creating appropriate learning goals in student teaching was slightly lower than the number demonstrating this level of performance during the pre-student teaching experience. At the same time, there was a significant increase in the percentage of student teachers who were able to meet expectations for designing instruction that reflects the application of knowledge about learning goals, student characteristics and needs, and learning contexts.

Outcome 3: Early Childhood majors complete a pre-student teaching field experience in two classrooms (Session I and Session II). The data indicate that candidates are more likely to exceed expectations in their interactions with children than in the implementation of instruction. At least 89% of the candidates were able to meet or exceed expectations for interactions with children in ways that support learning. At least 71% were able to meet or exceed expectations for implementing instruction.

Outcome 4: In Fall 2005, candidates created a teacher work sample during ECH 480 (Pre-Student Teaching Field Experience) which required them to demonstrate the effects of their teaching on student learning. In Spring 2006, this same group of candidates completed a similar teacher work sample during student teaching (ECH 410). All student teachers (ECH 410) at least partially met the expectations for demonstrating effects on young children’s learning. The number of candidates who were able to meet expectations for using the analysis of student learning to make instructional decisions, to use assessment data to profile student learning and communicate this information to appropriate individuals, and to reflect on their teaching was greater during student teaching (ECH 410) than in the pre-student teaching field experience (ECH 480). The greatest area of growth from pre-student teaching to student teaching is evident in the number of candidates who fully met expectations for using assessment data to profile student learning and communicating this information. The data, however, did not reflect an increase in the number of student teachers who met expectations for using multiple assessments aligned with learning goals to assess the learning of young children before, during, and after instruction.

Feedback Loop:

Changes planned in reaction to 2005-2006 assessment data: Early childhood faculty will examine the extent to which the test objectives for the subarea of the Illinois Early Childhood Certification test “Language and Literacy Development” are adequately addressed in the early childhood coursework. Faculty will examine course content and assignments to identify strategies for increasing the number of candidates who “meet” standards for planning instruction. Faculty will examine course content and assignment prior to and during the semester in which candidates complete the pre-student teaching field experience (ECH 480) to identify techniques and/or content that could be included in the curriculum to decrease the number of candidates who do not meet expectations for implementing instruction. Faculty will examine course content and assignments prior to and during ECH 480 to increase the number of candidates who can effectively demonstrate the effects of their teaching on young children’s learning.

Changes implemented from 2004-2005 assessment data: A midpoint review of the portfolio was implemented to monitor the extent to which candidates make adequate progress in meeting state standards for early childhood teachers prior to the senior year. Course content and assignments in LLA 311, RDG 382, RDG 383, and RDG 432 were revised to better prepare candidates to teach children in kindergarten and first grade to read and write. One instructor is teaching these four courses in an effort to increase continuity, reduce repetition of content, and insure that all literacy standards are infused into the curriculum. An assessment of candidates’ adherence to WIU Teacher Education Dispositions prior to entry to the Early Childhood program was implemented.

Department: Dietetics, Fashion Merchandising, and Hospitality

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students will be innovative, competent and critical thinking professionals who provide leadership and service within the workplace and in a diverse ever-changing environment, and
  2. Students will demonstrate technical, human and conceptual skills for careers in consumer services.

Direct and Indirect Measurement: None specified.

Results: Indirect measurement indicates that functioning effectively as a member of a team was ranked first or second by all groups of graduates and was the highest rated statement by the current students; faculty is knowledgeable and up-to-date on content that they teach; more than fifty percent of the graduates indicated that their career preparedness was average when compared to graduates from other colleges/universities; fifty percent of dietetics graduates thought that their level of preparation was above average; 42 percent of the graduates indicated that they would likely attend an educational program such as a workshop or seminar, and a smaller percentage indicated a willingness to serve on an area or departmental advisory board; more than 80 percent of the graduates indicated that they would not likely participate in getting other graduates and industry representatives to contribute to a departmental financial campaign; common areas of concern for all three groups of students and for many graduates were social and civic involvement, placing contemporary societal problems in perspective, developing self-esteem and understanding the scientific process; almost seven of ten students indicated that if they could do it over that they would attend Western Illinois University and pursue a degree from the Department of Dietetics, Fashion Merchandising and Hospitality; sixty-nine percent of current students rated their overall satisfaction with their experiences in the department thus far as satisfactory or very satisfactory.

Feedback Loop: A major goal is curriculum revision in preparation for application for accreditation. Laboratories need upgrading.

Department: Education and Interdisciplinary Studies: Bilingual Education

Learning Objectives:

  1. A comprehensive command of the language of instruction, subject matter, methods of inquiry, and structure of the discipline;
  2. Understanding of how individuals grow, develop and learn;
  3. Understanding of how students differ in their approaches to learning; understanding of instructional planning and designs;
  4. Understanding of the use of individual and group motivation and behavior;
  5. Understanding and ability to use a variety of instructional strategies;
  6. Knowledge of effective written, nonverbal, verbal, and visual communication techniques;
  7. Understanding of various formal and informal assessment strategies; understanding of the role of community in education and development and maintenance of collaborative relationships with colleagues, parents, guardians, and community;
  8. Reflectively evaluates how his/her choices and actions affect culturally and linguistically diverse students;
  9. Understands education as a profession, maintains standards of professional conduct, and provides leadership to improve learning and well-being;
  10. Effectively communicates and is able to develop each student’s ability to read, write, speak, and listen;
  11. Possesses the knowledge and skills to assist students in using technology to solve problems.

Direct and Indirect Measurement: The Illinois Basic Skills Certification test; portfolio and reflective paper; grades of “C: or above in English 180, English 280, Communications 241, and Math 106; Speech and Hearing exam; and a positive recommendation from the EIS Department. A 2.75 cumulative GPA is required. Students must successfully complete a series of Elementary Education and professional education courses before entering their student teaching experience. Student progress is monitored by the Bilingual Committee each semester, with each field experience, and at program’s end with a learning portfolio; certification; recommendation of the program faculty and chair; and satisfactory evaluations from the mentor teacher and University Supervisor for student teaching.

Results: Faculty review of portfolios found strong alignment between student work and program goals and objectives. Portfolios will be utilized again during the coming year.

Feedback Loop: The need for program coordination support remains an issue

Department: Instructional Technology and Telecommunications

Learning Objectives: As a result of completing the undergraduate program, students will be able to:

  1. Design and develop instructional materials which show evidence of effective use of instructional design principles.
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in communication skills
  3. Demonstrate a clear vision of their career goals and produce an effective resume and portfolio which document their skills, experiences, and education.

Direct and Indirect Measurement:

  1. Program Entry, with proficiency module exams, admission requirements, and an entry survey;
  2. Mid-career, with the Junior Portfolio in the spring semester ITT 330 Instructional Project Management course (a successful portfolio consisting of two projects from two prior courses; supporting information for each project which provides the date and semester the project was developed, conditions under which the project was completed, and the student’s role and contribution; a resume that documents their skills and experiences; professional quality products; and a grade of “C” or better on the portfolio);
  3. Exit Level, with submission of the Senior Portfolio ( a successful portfolio consists of major instructional products from at least four ITT classes; multiple presentation formats are available to the student, including print, CD-ROM, or video; supporting information for each project which provides the date and semester the project was developed; conditions under which the project was completed, and the student’s role and contribution; a resume that documents their skills and experiences; professional quality in the products; and a grade of “C” or better on the portfolio).

Results: Eighteen students completed 10 proficiency module exams in Fall ’05. The average score was 88.25 out of 100. From online entrance survey data analyzed in summer 2006: the average self-assessed skill level across skills was 3.97 on a 1 to 5 scale. Averages for all 53 skill levels were 2.9 or above. 20 students completed the Junior Portfolio and 20 students completed the Senior Portfolio.

Feedback Loop: Based on last year’s analysis, the current undergraduate and graduate curricula continue to be reviewed to ensure curriculum alignment and integration of course strands that stress professionalism, research/theory, and teamwork. The curriculum was also reviewed for alignment with national standards. From this analysis, three new undergraduate degree options were proposed. The three undergraduate degree options were reviewed and approved in the spring of 2006 by the college undergraduate curriculum committee and the CCPI. The three degree options will go to the Faculty Senate in September for final approval.

Recommendations from student survey are being considered for the upcoming academic year.

Department: Kinesiology

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students will demonstrate minimum knowledge of core disciplinary fields of study in kinesiology;
  2. Student will maintain an acceptable level of fitness to meet established norms for their age and gender;
  3. Students will possess sufficient knowledge to successfully complete departmental comprehensive examinations and State/National certification examinations in one of three possible selected areas of study.

Direct and Indirect Measurement:

  • All Majors: 100 item multiple choice exam; Fitnessgram;
  • Athletic Training: clinical proficiencies demonstrated at 70% level of success in five clinical experiences, score at least 70 on a written comprehensive exam (developed by faculty that teach in the AT program) at the end of each clinical experience to demonstrate knowledge competency before moving on the next clinical level, internship National Athletic Training Association Board of Certification (NATABOC) exam;
  • Exercise Science and Fitness: score at least 70 on a written comprehensive exam (developed by faculty that teach in the ES program), lab practicum; internship;
  • Physical Education Teacher Education: Illinois Certification Testing System (ICTS) Physical Education content test; Student Teaching.

Results:

All Majors: KIN 468 Content Knowledge Assessment II, of 85 students enrolled, 83 completed the assessment (2 “no shows”):

  •  
    • 38 passed (> 70) on first attempt - 38/83 = 46%
    • 32 passed on second attempt - 32/45 = 71%
    • 7 passed on third attempt - 7/13 = 54%
    • 3 passed on fourth attempt - 3/6 = 50%
    • 3 passed on fifth attempt - 3/3 = 100%

KIN 467 Health-Related Fitness Assessment II, of 84 students enrolled, 73 passed all assessments on first attempt:

  •  
    • 4 did not show,
    • 3 were ill,
    • 3 failed the run,
    • 1 failed upper body;
    • these 11 students were provided opportunities to re-take the assessments and each passed on subsequent attempts

Athletic Training: 11 students successfully completed internships - AT 420

  • NATABOC Results: 15 students sat for the exam
    • 2 passed all 3 parts on their first attempt - 2/15 = 13.3%
      • National first time passing rate = 26.3%
  • Of the 15 candidates who sat for the exam for the first time:
    • 4 passed the written portion of the exam - 4/15 = 26.7%
      • National pass rate = 46.8%
    • 5 passed the practical portion of the exam - 5/13 = 38.6%
      • National pass rate = 55.6%
    • 7 passed the simulation portion of the exam - 7/15 = 46.7%
      • National pass rate = 61.0%

Exercise Science and Fitness : 33 students successfully completed internships - KIN 400

  • Comprehensive Exam (written and lab practicum)
    • 27 passed on first attempt - 27/38 = 71%
    • 11 passed on second attempt - 11/11 = 100%

Physical Education Teacher Education: 29 students successfully completed student teaching - STch 480 and STch 483.

  • ICTS Test Results for 2005 (only year that data were available from CPEP)
    • WIU students - 36/39 passed - 92% average score = 255.3
    • All Illinois students - 606/880 - 69% average score = 244.5
    • NOTE: minimum score needed for passing = 240

Feedback Loop:

  • All Majors: Faculty that teach in the Core classes are developing alternate questions to create multiple versions of the KIN 468 exam. Basically, the same exam has been used over the four semesters the exam has been administered. Beginning with the Fall 2006 semester, multiple versions of the exam will be used to test the same content areas.
  • Athletic Training: Clinical and written proficiencies tested in the clinical experiences will assess cumulative knowledge rather than only new knowledge gained in the clinical level alone.
  • Exercise Science and Fitness: Faculty will continue to monitor the curriculum for compliance with certification standards for the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA).
  • Physical Education Teacher Education: Results on the state certification content exam will continue to be monitored to determine strengths and weaknesses that need to be addressed in the preparation of pre-service physical education teachers.

Department: Law Enforcement and Justice Administration

Learning Outcomes: Students will demonstrate working knowledge of;

  1. The basic aspects of the processing of adults and juveniles through the criminal justice process from arrest to corrections;
  2. The substantive portions of criminal law, along with the understanding of how the criminal laws are made and interpreted, including the general principles of criminal law and constitutional limits and defenses applicable to criminal law;
  3. Basic criminal investigation techniques and theory including case preparation;
  4. The basic organization and administration in criminal justice, including organization structure, demands and situations, with emphasis on the role of the administrator and on criminal justice policy formulation;
  5. The steps of the criminal justice process through which the criminal law is enforced and the defendant passes and of the constitutional rights and related responsibility of the police and other criminal justice officials at each of these steps;
  6. The rules of evidence, trial procedure, rules of admissibility and pretrial discovery;
  7. The knowledge of civil law and procedure, including the areas of arrest, search and investigation;
  8. One of the following areas advanced areas: policing, institutional corrections, community corrections, security, fire or courts;
  9. Concepts relating to cultural diversity and the ethics/morality of criminal justice practitioner.

Direct and Indirect Measurement: Internship, GPA, Area Concentration Achievement Tests, University and Departmental Honors, term papers.

Results: The use of the Area Concentration Achievement Tests has shown that WIU LEJA students are in the upper 50% of LEJA students nationwide. Questionnaires each semester provide feedback to the department regarding LEJA student concerns. The department and student assessment surveys provide feedback regarding recent department improvements.

Feedback Loop: The feedback from the Alumni survey, student surveys, the Professional Advisory Group, and more than 1000 internship organizations has been superb.

Department: Recreation, Park, and Tourism Administration

Learning Outcomes: Students will demonstrate acceptable levels of knowledge, understanding, and abilities;

  1. Of the conceptual foundations of play, recreation and leisure;
  2. Of the professional culture of the parks and leisure services field;
  3. Relative to the leisure services delivery system;
  4. Relative to programming strategies;
  5. Relative to assessment, planning, and evaluation;
  6. Administration; relative to legislative and legal aspects.

Direct and Indirect Measurement: Student performance is monitored in RPTA 199, 399, and the capstone course, RPTA 499. The Intern Supervisor will summarize and evaluate information gained from intern evaluation instruments.

Results: Strengths identified through assessment activities included student perception of quality instruction; classroom rigor; positive mix of theory and practice in the program; breadth of internship opportunities; and outstanding academic advising. Weaknesses identified through assessment activities included lack of student diversity; very poor transmission of course content (via two way video/audio) between Macomb and the Quad Cities, lack of a formal mechanism for service outreach, poor environmental conditions in Currens Hall, and unmet demand in the Quad Cities region.

Classroom performance is indicative of positive learning environments. Feedback from alumni, employers and doctoral program representatives validate high levels of student preparedness. Undergraduate internship performance, as self-reported by interns, and as evaluated by practicing professionals, validates high levels of competency in relation to stated learning outcomes. Immediate success and upward mobility of alumni, as observed by faculty and validated through a growing network of successful alumni. Re-accreditation was awarded, with no major concerns listed by reviewers.

Feedback Loop: Develop the Annual Assessment activities around the revised learning outcomes for the Undergraduate Major on both the Macomb and QC campuses respectively.

Department: Social Work

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Apply critical thinking skills;
  2. Practice within the values and ethics of the profession;
  3. Demonstrate professional use of self;
  4. Value diversity;
  5. Demonstrate effective oral and written communication;
  6. Analyze the impact of social policies;
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of oppression and discrimination;
  8. Demonstrate an understanding of history of social work;
  9. Apply knowledge of bio-psycho-social variables;
  10. Apply generalist social work practice;
  11. Demonstrate evaluation of research studies and application of findings to social work practice;
  12. Demonstrate evaluation of research studies and application of findings to practice interventions and program effectiveness;
  13. Use supervision effectively;
  14. Function ethically and effectively.

Direct and Indirect Measurement: no measurement listed.

Results: No specific data included.

Feedback Loop: none listed.

Department: Special Education

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Undergraduate special education candidates will demonstrate their knowledge of content;
  2. Undergraduate special education candidates will plan effective instruction;
  3. Undergraduate special education candidates will successfully implement instruction;
  4. Undergraduate special education candidates will demonstrate effects on student learning in the classroom.

Direct and Indirect Measurement:

Direct Measures: Illinois Content Area Test - Learning Behavior Specialist I; Department Content Area Assessments (Exams and Course Projects); Content Area Unit Plans (SPED 420 and SPED 440 Methods Coursework); Evaluation of Teaching (SPED 430 and SPED 445 Pre-Student Teaching Field Experiences); Work Samples (Pre-Student Teaching Field Experiences and Student Teaching).

Indirect Measures: Student Teaching Survey; Student Teacher Interviews.

Results: 100% of the 42 undergraduate special education candidates passed the Illinois Content Area Test for the Learning Behavior Specialist I. During 2005-2006, faculty revised the unit plan requirements and created a new rubric to meet CEC/ISBE requirements for program review. The department will begin to implement these new assessments and aggregate data in Fall 2006. During 2005-2006, faculty created a new, common summative evaluation assessment of field experiences in SPED 430 and SPED 445 to meet CEC/ISBE requirements for program review. The department will begin to implement this new assessment and aggregate data in Fall 2006. During 2005-2006, faculty created a new, common evaluation assessment of work samples to meet CEC/ISBE requirements for program review. The department will begin to implement this new assessment and aggregate data in Fall 2006.

Feedback Loop: Changes planned in reaction to 2005-2006 assessment data; Evaluation of all candidate unit, work sample, and field experience performances will utilize newly revised rubrics aligned to CEC/ISBE standards; evaluation of all candidate unit, work sample, and field experience performances will be completed on the Task Stream data base system; Aggregation of data will occur electronically.

Changes implemented from 2004-2005 assessment data; Completion of the alignment of field experiences with CEC/ISBE standards; completion of the process to establish and define the relationship between content taught in methods courses and performances assessed in field experiences; completion of an evaluation process where assessments will be completed electronically on the Task Stream data base system, allowing for the electronic aggregation of data. This system will also enhance our ability to make comparisons over time.