Center for International Studies

Minority Health Month: April 2014

Western Illinois University will join the nation in recognizing April as Minority Health Month with this year's theme being, "Coming Together for a Healthier You."  A excellent variety of activities have been planned to kickoff the month-long celebration.

If you would like to plan activities or share ideas with your hometown, the national tool kit is available at http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/npa/files/Plans/Toolkit/NPA_Toolkit.pdf

 

Ongoing activities: (April 1-25th)

Food Drive:  Donation boxes for canned food items will be in the following buildings: Memorial, Browne, Multicultural Center, Sherman, Knoblauch, and Stipes. All donations will be made to the local Loaves and Fishes.

 

Wednesday, April 2

Health Fair: 10:00 am – 2:00 pm – Multicultural Center heart

Different screenings available will include the following: hearing, blood glucose, blood pressure, HIV testing, blood typing, and much more!
Free and open to the public. All minors must be accompanied by a guardian. If you have any questions or a disability that may require accommodations in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact Gwendolyn Brooks Cultural Center at 309/298-2220.

 

Stress Clinic: 1:00 -3:00 pm - Counseling Center - Resource Room, Memorial Hall. Students can try the Relaxation Chair, as well as EmWave, a stress management software program measuring heart rhythms used in relaxation training

 

Health & Overcoming Multiple Sclerosis : 3:00-4:30 pm - Boardroom, Multicultural Center

Presenter Clevon Harris will be speaking on "Health & Overcoming Multiple Sclerosis"

 

Thursday, April 3

Minority Health Month Information Table: 11:30 am – 1:30 pm, Union Concourse

restrepo

 

Restrepo: 3:00 pm - Sandburg Theater (basement University Union)

Restrepo is a 2010 documentary film about the Afghanistan war, directed by American journalist Sebastian Junger and the late British/American photojournalist Tim Hetherington. The documentary Restrepo follows a platoon of U.S. soldiers into Afghanistan's Korengal Valley, which, in 2008, was known as "the deadliest place on earth." The film brings awareness to life during deployment, and how difficult transitioning back to civilian life can be. All staff, faculty and students are welcome, and will gain a better understanding of the experiences of Westerns students who have served. Sponsored by the Veterans Resource Center, the University Counseling Center, the Department of Military Science, the Disability Resource Center and Beu Health Center. To view the trailer, click here.

 

Tuesday, April 8

What is Equity? Panel Discussion: 4:00 -5:00 pm - Multicultural Center, Moderator: Dr. Mei Wen, Health Sciences

Lynette Cale, McDonough County Health Department, Joanna Graham, Health Sciences, Andrian MacGregor or Christie Beck, McDonough District Hospital, Barbara Slater, Beu Health Center, Shelly Ward, CEO - Wesley Village

 

Minority Health Month Information Table: 11:30 am - 1:30 pm - Union Concourse

 

Wednesday, April 9

Stress Clinic: 1:00 -3:00 pm - Counseling Center - Resource Room, Memorial Hall. Students can try the Relaxation Chair, as well as EmWave, a stress management software program measuring heart rhythms used in relaxation training

 

Reframing Disability - Dr. Amanda Kraus:  7:30 - 1st floor Multicultural Center

Sponsored by Students for Disability Awareness, Student Therapeutic Recreation Society, RPTA 251, Disability Resource Center, Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Administration, University Counseling Center, Veterans Resource Center, the Visiting Lecture Committee, Council on Student Activities Fund

 

Thursday, April 10

Minority Health Month Information Table: 11:30 am - 1:30 pm - Union Concourse

 

"Curing" Gays: Understanding Conversion Therapy - Dr. Burt Sorkey: 12:30 pm, Sandburg Theater (basement, University Union), Documentary: Conversion therapy is used by people in an attempt to change others from gay to straight

 

Friday, April 11

Relay for Life, Joanna Graham, Health Sciences: 4:00 - 10:00 pm, Union Quad, near Hansen Field

Sponsored by the American Cancer Society, Relay for Life is the world's largest grassroots fundraising movement and mobilizes communities throughout the country to celebrate people who have battled cancer, remember loved ones lost and provide participants with an opportunity to fight back against the disease. Relay has become a global phenomenon that brings together friends, families, businesses-people from all walks of life-all aimed at furthering the American Cancer Society's vision of creating a world with less cancer and more birthdays. Relay for Life provides an environment for everyone in our region and on the WIU campus to join in the fight against cancer. It is truly inspiring to witness the cancer survivors in our community as they celebrate their victory over the disease.

 

World Cup Soccer Tournament: 4:00-7:00 pm - Vince Grady Field

Games will be played using Intramural Outdoor Soccer rules (6 vs. 6 including goalie). Teams will consist of a minimum of five players and a maximum of nine players. Any team may be co-ed, all male, or all female. We will not have separate brackets for this tou soccer ball rnament.

The cost to play will be $5 per player.  All proceeds will go toward a local charity.

 

Monday, April 14

"Diversity in Minority Health: Foods and Culture"  6:30 pm, Grand Ballroom
Co-Sponsored by the Department of Dietetics, Fashion Merchandising, and Hospitality, Gwendolyn Brooks Cultural Center, Lambda Theta Phi Fraternity INC, Center For International Studies

 

 

Come hear from different presenters and enjoy a menu of Chinese Hot and Sour soup, Mandarin Salad, Corn bread, Enchilada bake, Red beans and rice, Peach cobbler, Horchata or Mexican Lemonade

 

 

Tuesday, April 15

Minority Health Month Information Table: 11:30 am - 1:30 pm - Union Concourse

 

Wednesday, April 16

Stress Clinic: 1:00 -3:00 pm - Counseling Center - Resource Room, Memorial Hall.   Students can try the Relaxation Chair, as well as EmWave, a stress management software program measuring heart rhythms used in relaxation training

 

"Bitter Seeds" Film Screen ing, 2:00 pm, Sandburg Theater (Union Basement)

This documentary focuses on the tragic effect of genetically modified seeds on farmers in India.

 

"Native Americans in the Attic", Dr. Hal Marchand (EOS, Health Sciences) 3:00 pm, Multicultural Resource Center, Room 201

Native Americans in the Attic will include a discussion on Native American ancestry in populations that are usually not considered Native. Like Hispanic "conversos" (Christians who carry on ancient Judaic practices from their Jewish ancestors who converted to Christianity to avoid persecution), there are a growing number of people in the US who recognize their Native ancestries that are usually not more one to three generations behind. While these Natives in the Attic may not be enrolled officially in their Tribes of origin, they contribute to a better understanding and appr4eifdtaion of Native American culture. Up until the last few decades, many families simply denied their Native heritage. This presentation will draw similarities between other racial and ethic groups and the struggle they have encountered in coming out of the attic.

 

Thursday, April 17

Minority Health Month Information Table: 11:30 am - 1:30 pm - Union Concourse

 

Friday, April 18

Curry Chicken - Cooking Demonstration and Tasting- Rita Kaul (DFMH), Dr. Bhavneet Walia (Economics), Time and Location TBA

 

Tuesday, April 22

Minority Health Month Information Table: 11:30 am - 1:30 pm - Union Concourse

 

Wednesday, April 23

Stress Clinic: 1:00 -3:00 pm - Counseling Center - Resource Room, Memorial Hall. Students can try the Relaxation Chair, as well as EmWave, a stress management software program measuring heart rhythms used in relaxation training

 

Thursday, April 24

Minority Health Month Information Table: 11:30 am - 1:30 pm - Union Concourse

 

brazil flag

Cultural Café – Brazil: 12:30 pm, Grand Ballroom (1st floor of the University Union)

Come listen to a of group of Brazilian students talk about their country's culture, food, and health practices. Authentic cuisine from Brazil will be served.

 

fat sick and nearly dead Fat, Sick & Nearly Dead: 3:00 pm - Lincoln Room (1st floor of the University Union)

100 pounds overweight, loaded up on steroids and suffering from a debilitating autoimmune disease, Joe Cross is at the end of his rope and the end of his hope. Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead is an inspiring film that chronicles Joe's personal mission to regain his health.  To view the trailer, click here.

 

 Tuesday, April 29

Minority Health Month Information Table: 11:30 am - 1:30 pm - Union Concourse

 

Local Farmer's Panel - Jean Davenport, Macomb Food Co-op, Dr. John Miller, Communications: 3:00 - 4:00 pm - Multicultural Center, Multipurpose Room.

 Join local food representatives, Jean Davenport of the Macomb Food Co-op, Dr. John Miller of the Macomb Community Garden, and John Curtis of Barefoot Gardens for a panel discussion about buying locally and growing food. The panel will be moderated by Professor Joel Gruver of Western's Agriculture Department.

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, April 30

Stress Clinic: 1:00 -3:00 pm - Counseling Center - Resource Room, Memorial Hall.  "Walk-In Stress Management Clinic. Students can try the Relaxation Chair, as well as EmWave, a stress management software program measuring heart rhythms used in relaxation training."

 

Keynote Presentation: A Native American First Nations Inter-Nation-al Perspective on Indigenous Health Time, Dr. Rose-Alma McDonald, Mohawk Turtle Clan, 5:00 pm, Stipes 121

 

This presentation addresses indigenous health from a Native American (US) and First Nations (Canadian) perspective. Dr. McDonald is a Mohawk woman who resides on the only reservation in North America that borders two countries, two Canadian provinces and one U.S. state: Ontario, Quebec, New York State, Canada and USA.

 

Dr. McDonald will discuss indigenous health giving an overview of health in Canadian and USA perspective outlining key health issues, trends and risk factors in an indigenous context. She will, within this context, also discuss health from a holistic perspective, thereby describing the indigenous world view of health and healing. She will describe healing practices that are utilized in Native American and First Nations communities that focus on traditional medicines, ceremonies and other First Nations/Native American practices. Dr. McDonald will also describe national perspectives on health surveillance and the importance of First Nations/Native American driven methodologies to health promotion and disease prevention.