Graduate Studies

Psychology
2013-2014

Admission | Courses | Program | Requirements | Profile

Chairperson: Karen Sears

Clinical/Community Mental Health Option Coordinator:
Tracy A. Knight
General Experimental Psychology Option Coordinator:
Kristine M. Kelly
Specialist in School Psychology Program Coordinator:
Ruth M. Kelly
Office:  Waggoner Hall 100
Telephone: (309) 298-1593 Fax: (309) 298-2179
E-mail: psychology@wiu.edu
Website:  wiu.edu/psychology/
Location of Program Offering: Macomb

Graduate Faculty
Professors

  • Tracy K. Cruise, Ph.D., Illinois State University
  • Virginia A. Diehl, Ph.D., University of Maryland
  • Steven I. Dworkin, Ph.D., University of Florida
  • Kristine M. Kelly, Ph.D., University of Tennessee-Knoxville
  • Ruth M. Kelly, Ph.D., University of Texas
  • Tracy A. Knight, Ph.D., Fielding Institute
  • Eugene W. Mathes, Ph.D., Iowa State University
  • Kimberley A. McClure, Ph.D., University of Texas-El Paso
  • Russell E. Morgan, Ph.D., Kent State University
  • Karen Sears, Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Associate Professors

  • Matthew Blankenship, Ph.D., Indiana University
  • Curt Dunkel, Ph.D., University of Nebraska
  • Paige Goodwin, Ph.D., Pennsylvania University
  • Colin Harbke, Ph.D., Washington State University
  • Scott Hemenover, Ph.D., University of Nebraska
  • Robert C. Intrieri, Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi
  • David Lane, Ph.D., Iowa State University
  • Jeff Laurent, Ph.D., University of Texas-Austin
  • Dana Lindemann, Ph.D., Washington State University
  • Sandra L. McFadden, Ph.D., Northern Illinois University
  • James A. Schmidt, Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Hiroko Sotozaki, Ph.D., Carleton University

Assistant Professors

  • Jonathan Hammersley, Ph.D., Southern Illinois University-Carbondale
  • Julie Herbstrith, Ph.D., Illinois State University

Associate Graduate Faculty
Assistant Professor

  • Kathy McGuire, Ph.D., University of Toledo

 Program Description

The Department of Psychology offers work leading to the Specialist in School Psychology degree and the Master of Science degree in psychology in the areas of clinical/community mental health and general experimental psychology. The school psychology program leads to licensure as a school psychologist in the State of Illinois. Detailed descriptions of each of the programs may be obtained from the departmental office.

The graduate programs in psychology are designed to serve: a) students interested in becoming practitioners in the field of school psychology or in community mental health; b) students interested in eventually pursuing doctoral degrees at other institutions; and c) students wishing to function as teachers, researchers, or in other related capacities in settings not requiring the doctorate.

 Admission Requirements

A minimum of 15 semester hours in psychology from an accredited institution is the basic prerequisite for admission. Each incoming student is expected to have successfully completed course work in each of the following three areas: general psychology, statistics/experimental, and learning/cognitive. In addition, students entering the clinical/community mental health program are expected to have successfully completed courses in abnormal psychology and personality. Persons lacking one or more of these courses will be required to pass the appropriate undergraduate course(s) before being admitted to candidacy for a graduate degree in psychology. Courses taken to make up undergraduate deficiencies cannot be applied to the credit requirements for graduate degrees.

Each applicant for admission to graduate study in psychology must submit: official transcripts from all undergraduate institutions attended, three letters of recommendation, Graduate Record Examination scores (the General Test), and a biographical statement emphasizing academic, nonacademic, and employment experiences relevant to the degree program selected. Applicants should also describe how they expect their degree training to fit into their future plans.

At the time of application, potential graduate students must indicate whether they intend to concentrate in clinical/community mental health, general experimental psychology, or school psychology. Admission is into a specific program.

 Degree Requirements

A minimum of 37 semester hours of course work is required to complete the master's program in general experimental psychology; a minimum of 65 semester hours is required in clinical/community mental health; a minimum of 66 semester hours is required in the School Psychology program. Students in clinical/community mental health are required to pass comprehensive examinations. Students in the School Psychology program must pass all portfolio requirements.

 General Experimental Psychology Option

 

PSY 443G Principles of Neuroscience with Laboratory (4)
PSY 500 Techniques in Research and Program Evaluation (3)
PSY 501 Advanced Psychological Statistics (4)
PSY 521 Advanced Cognitive Processes (3)
PSY 522 Lifespan Development (3)
PSY 523 Social Bases of Behavior (3)
PSY 550 Current Research in Psychology Seminar (2)
PSY 600 Seminar (6)
PSY 601 Thesis (6)
Directed Electives(400G, 500- or 600-level) (3)

TOTAL PROGRAM: 37 s.h.

In addition, students in the general experimental psychology option are required to pass an oral examination based on their thesis research.

Of the 37 semester hours, no more than six semester hours can be taken at the 400G level. Elective course work can be taken in departments other than psychology to allow flexibility in tailoring a program for a student. As an example, graduate courses in management and human resource management from the College of Business and Technology might be electives for a student interested in industrial/organizational psychology.

 Clinical/Community Mental Health Option

Core Course: 4 s.h.

PSY 502 Research Methods in Applied Settings (4)

Theory and Application: 25 s.h.

PSY 570 Systems of Psychotherapy (3)
PSY 571 Group Processes and Group Psychotherapy (3)
PSY 572 Clinical Classification and Decision Processes (3)
PSY 573 Crisis Intervention and Community Mental Health (3)
PSY 576 Family Therapy Theory and Practice (3)
PSY 582 Clinical Assessment I: Cognitive Assessment (2)
PSY 583 Clinical Assessment II: Personality Assessment (3)
PSY 595 Career Assessment in Professional Psychology (3)
PSY 596 Approaches to Substance Abuse Diagnosis and Treatment (3)
PSY 600 Seminar: Psychopharmacology for Community Mental Health (2)

Developmental Psychology (Select one): 3 s.h.

PSY 422G Adolescent Development (3)
PSY 520 Advanced Child Psychology (3)
PSY 522 Lifespan Development (3)

Acquired or Learned Bases of Behavior (Select one): 3 s.h.

PSY 442G Principles of Behavior Modification (3)
PSY 456G Cognitive Processes (3)
PSY 521 Advanced Cognitive Processes (3)
PSY 600 Seminar: Cognitive Behavior (3)
PSY 600 Seminar: Behavioral Analysis (3)

Social/Cultural Bases of Behavior: 3 s.h.

PSY 523 Social Bases of Behavior (3)

Ethical and Professional Standards: 3 s.h.

PSY 574 Professional Issues in Clinical/Community Mental Health (3)

Sensitivity to Social and Cultural Diversity: 1 s.h.

PSY 575 Diversity Issues and Psychological Services (1)

Supervised Experience: 20–24 s.h.

PSY 577 Prepracticum in Clinical/Community Mental Health (1)
PSY 587 Practicum: Basic Interviewing Skills (2)
PSY 588 Interpersonal Processes in Therapy (2)
PSY 589 Practicum: Cognitive and Behavioral Processes in Therapy (2)
PSY 602 Professional Experience (1–3, repeatable to 5)
PSY 604 Internship in Clinical/Community Mental Health (6, minimum of 12, repeatable to 12)

Comprehensive Exam: 0 s.h.

PSY 605 Comprehensive Examination in Clinical/Community Mental Health

TOTAL PROGRAM: 66 s.h.

School Psychology Program

Students in the school psychology program are required to successfully complete a minimum of 66 graduate semester hours of course work and field experiences. If a student meets all course requirements in fewer than 66 semester hours, additional graduate-level course work in related areas (e.g., elementary education, special education, counselor education, educational administration) must be taken to fulfill the 66 semester hour requirement. Such additional course work must meet the approval of the student’s academic adviser.

Courses that are also required for the school psychology program, unless equivalent undergraduate courses have been successfully completed, are:

PSY 425G Psychology of Exceptional Children (3)
PSY 442G Principles of Behavior Modification (3)

Degree Requirements

PSY 502 Research Methods in Applied Settings (4)
PSY 520 Advanced Child Psychology (3)
PSY 541 Practicum I: Orientation to School Psychology (3)
PSY 542 Practicum II: Academic Assessment and Intervention (3)
PSY 543 Practicum III: Counseling and Assessment (3)
PSY 544 Practicum IV: Evaluation and Intervention (3)
PSY 570 Systems of Psychotherapy (3)
PSY 571 Group Processes and Group Psychotherapy (3)
PSY 581 Individual Psychological Evaluation: Intellectual Assessment (3)
PSY 583 Clinical Assessment II: Personality Assessment (3)
PSY 585 Psychological Problems of the Child (3)
PSY 590 Introduction to School Psychology (3)
PSY 591 Behavioral Consultation (3)

PSY 592 Child Neuropsychology
or
PSY 444G Biopsychology of Drugs and Addiction
or
PSY 600 Seminar: Psychopharmacology for Community Mental Health (3)

EDL 520 Leadership for Special Needs (3)
LA 578 Language Arts for Diverse Learners (3)

PSY 575 Diversity Issue and Psychological Services (1)
or
CN 552 Counseling/Helping in a Multicultural Society (3)

PSY 593 Intervention with Children and Adolescents (3)
PSY 599 School Psychology Portfolio (0)

PSY 601 Thesis (3)
or
PSY 602 Professional Experience (applied research project) (2)

PSY 603 School Psychology Internship (12)
PSY 606 Illinois State Accreditation Exam (0)

 

TOTAL PROGRAM: 66-70 s.h.

 Course Descriptions

Psychology (PSY)

422G Adolescent Development. (3) A study of adolescence from the standpoint of growth and adjustment, emphasizing the areas of physical, intellectual, social, and emotional development. Prerequisite: PSY 100 and, PSY 221 or EIS 201, or graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

423G Psychology of Adulthood and Aging. (3) A survey of the adult years from early childhood to old age and the dying process. Emphasis will be placed on psychological theories and research related to aging and its implications. Prerequisite: Nine semester hours in psychology or graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

424G Abnormal Psychology. (3) A consideration of the psychological factors in behavior disorders. The problems of recognizing, understanding, treating, and preventing these disorders are surveyed. Prerequisite: PSY 251 and six additional hours in psychology, or graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

425G Psychology of Exceptional Children. (3) A psychological approach to children with exceptional learning and behavior characteristics. Examines assessment techniques, diagnostic categories, methods of remediation or enhancement, and relevant federal and state legislation. Prerequisite: PSY 221 or EIS 201, or graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

430G History and Systems of Psychology. (3) A study of the important historical and contemporary schools of psychology. The systems are presented in an historical setting leading to an evaluation of trends in psychology. Prerequisite: Nine semester hours in psychology or graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

433G (cross-listed with WS 433G) Psychology of Gender. (3) Examines the psychological, social, and biological bases for societal-defined sex roles. The knowledge of these factors will assist students in recognizing and understanding the influence of gender on human experiences (i.e., behaviors, cognitions, emotions, physiology) and relationships. Prerequisite: Nine semester hours of psychology, or graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

442G Principles of Behavior Modification. (3) An application of learning principles to modification of human behavior emphasizing operant and respondent principles. Topical areas include autistic behavior, academic learning, rehabilitation, token economies. Prerequisite: Nine semester hours in psychology, or graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

443G Principles of Neuroscience with Laboratory. (4) A study of the nervous system from a multidisciplinary perspective. This perspective emphasizes physiological, genetic, neurochemical, and psychological explanations of nervous system function. This class will include a 3-hour lecture component and a two-hour lab. Prerequisites: PSY 343, or BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or ZOOL 430, or CHEM 330, or CHEM 221, or PE 270, or permission of the instructor.

444G Biopsychology of Drugs and Addiction. (3) A systematic study of the relationships between drugs and psychological processes (i.e., psychopharmacology) with emphasis on the roles of the central nervous system, individual experience, and the environment in determining the outcome of drug use. Prerequisite: PSY 343, or BIOL 103, or HE 123, or HE 442, or graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

451G Personality. (3) An advanced treatment of the major research, concepts, and theoretical formations of personality, emphasizing integration of personality concepts with concepts from other areas such as learning and social psychology. Prerequisites: PSY 251 and six additional hours of psychology, or graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

453G Psychology and Law. (3) This course involves a comprehensive study of the interface between psychology and the legal system. Topics covered in this course include, but are not limited to: (1) forensic issues such as competency to stand trial, the insanity defense, and expert testimony, (2) research issues involving eyewitness memory, testimony, and identification, and (3) procedure issues such as the child interview and suspect interrogations. Prerequisite: Nine semester hours in psychology or permission of the instructor.

454G Psychological Tests and Measurements. (3) This course relates the basic concepts of psychological measurement to commonly used psychological tests. Relevant social and ethical issues related to testing are discussed. Prerequisite: Nine semester hours of psychology to include PSY 323 or equivalent, or graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

457G Industrial/Organizational Psychology. (3) Examines the theory and application of psychological principles to business and other organizational settings. Topics include employee selection and evaluation, work motivation, work attitudes, leadership, and organizational change. Prerequisites: Introductory psychology or HRM 353 and one course in statistics, or permission of the instructor.

500 Techniques in Research and Program Evaluation. (3) A course in research methodology. Topics include evaluation of laboratory, field, and clinical research. Each student must write a research proposal and several critiques.

501 Advanced Psychological Statistics. (4) A consideration of advanced statistical methods and experimental designs which are applicable to psychological research. Particular attention is given to correlation and analysis of variance. Prerequisite: PSY 223 or equivalent.

502 Research Methods in Applied Settings. (4) Overview of the interconnectedness of research design, statistics, and measurement in the context of applied settings is provided. Special emphasis is placed on using and conducting research in clinic and school settings. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Clinical/Community Mental Health or School Psychology programs, or permission of the instructor.

509 Practicum in Teaching Undergraduate Psychology. (3) A seminar designed to help students develop skills in teaching undergraduate courses in psychology through observation and supervised experiences. Acquaints students with instructional and disciplinary policies and resources, and assists students in evaluating personal strengths and weaknesses.

520 Advanced Child Psychology. (3) A systematic presentation of research and theories concerning the development of children. The student will design a research project related to the study of children. Prerequisite: An undergraduate course in development or child psychology, or permission of the instructor.

521 Advanced Cognitive Processes. (3) Perception, attention, memory, language, problem solving, decision-making, and intelligence will be covered with an emphasis on the integration of these systems in a conceptual model to facilitate professional application of knowledge and theory in cognitive psychology. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course work in cognitive psychology or permission of the instructor.

522 Lifespan Development. (3) Survey of the changes that take place during an individual’s life from infancy to old age. Includes study of the developing person at different periods in the lifespan, including childhood as well as early, middle, and late adulthood.

523 Social Bases of Behavior. (3) Survey of empirical research and theories on the psychological processes related to interpersonal behavior, focusing on topics such as attitude change, social influence, and prosocial behavior.

541 Practicum I: Orientation to School Psychology. (3) Introduces students to the roles and functions of school psychologists. Students observe and participate in activities related to school psychology through placements in schools and other settings. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

542 Practicum II: Academic Assessment and Intervention. (3) Overview of scope and sequence of pre-K—12 reading, math, and writing is provided. Students learn to administer, score and interpret standardized and curriculum-based measures of academic achievement. Academic interventions are designed, implemented and evaluated. Prerequisite: PSY 581.

543 Practicum III: Counseling and Assessment. (3) Introduces students to the role of the school psychologist in the regular and special education assessment process and individual counseling. Prerequisites: PSY 541 and 542.

544 Practicum IV. (3) Continued supervised and expanded experiences involving consultation, evaluations, and interventions for academic and psychological problems of children in school and other settings. Introduces students to small group counseling experiences. Prerequisites: PSY 541, 542, and 543.

550 Current Research in Psychology Seminar. (1, repeatable in consecutive semesters to 2) A survey of contemporary theoretical and methodological issues associated with areas of inquiry traditionally covered under general experimental psychology, including biopsychology, cognitive, developmental, industrial/organizational, learning, perception/sensation, personality, and social psychology.

560 Individual Research in Psychology. (1–2, repeatable to 4) The student will design, carry out, and write up an original experiment. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: Psychology 500 and permission of the instructor.

563 Individual Readings in Psychology. (1–2, repeatable to 4) The student will read extensively on topics chosen in consultation with a psychology instructor and prepare a written report on the topic(s). Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

570 Systems of Psychotherapy. (3) This course is intended to review various systems of psychotherapy and to introduce the student to professional considerations in the practice of psychotherapy.

571 Group Processes and Group Psychotherapy. (3) An examination of theories of group and family psychotherapy emphasizing how basic group processes such as cohesiveness, norm formation, communication skills, and leadership are used in therapeutic groups.

572 Clinical Classification and Decision Processes. (3) Examination of the practice of psychological diagnoses with emphasis upon informational bases and decision-making processes involved in and theoretical assumptions underlying these practices. Prerequisites: PSY 424 and 570, or permission of the instructor.

573 Crisis Intervention and Community Mental Health. (3) An introduction to the principles of community mental health emphasizing organization of community mental health services, mental health education, consultation, program evaluation, and crisis intervention.

574 Professional Issues in Clinical/Community Mental Health. (3) An in-depth examination of the ethical, legal, and professional issues involved in the provision of mental health services primarily in public settings. Illinois laws governing confidentiality, mandated reporting, and professional licensure will be discussed. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

575 Diversity Issues and Psychological Services. (1) Students will become acquainted with differences among groups who vary along the dimensions of ethnicity, gender, social class, sexual orientation, age, religious affiliation, and disability. Similarities among members of groups that occupy different positions along these dimensions will also be considered, as well as diversity within groups. These differences among and within groups, and similarities among people regardless of group membership, will be related to relevant issues relating to the provision of psychological services.

576 Family Therapy Theory and Practice. (3) Students will become familiar with the major theories that address family functioning and that guide therapeutic interventions. In addition, students will become familiar with a variety of specific assessment approaches and interventions that arise from psychological theory. Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to students in the school psychology or clinical/community mental health program, or permission of instructor.

577 Pre-Practicum in Clinical/Community Mental Health. (1) A practical introduction to the assessment and treatment of psychological disorders. Students will observe case presentations and selected treatment sessions as a way of developing familiarity with the procedures used in the delivery of mental health services. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to students in the school psychology or clinical/community mental health program.

581 Individual Psychological Evaluation: Intellectual Assessment. (3) Examines the administration, uses and interpretations of measures of ability and achievement, emphasizing cultural sensitivity in the application of these instruments. Includes supervised practice in the use of the Stanford Binet and Wechsler Scales. Prerequisite: Enrollment limited to students in school psychology or clinical/community mental health program or permission of the instructor.

582 Clinical Assessment I: Cognitive Assessment. (2) Examines the administration, uses of, and interpretation of measures of intellectual and neuropsychological functioning. Students will receive supervised instruction in the use of standardized tests of intelligence and neuropsychological screening devices, with special attention devoted to cultural and demographic issues that bear on the use of these measures. Prerequisite: Enrollment limited to students in the clinical/community mental health program or permission of the instructor.

583 Clinical Assessment II: Personality Assessment. (3) A review of contemporary objective and projective measures of personality. Emphasis is on development of applied skills in assembling a test battery, administrating and interpreting test results, and integrative report writing. Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to students in the clinical/community mental health program who have successfully completed PSY 582 or permission of the instructor.

585 Psychological Problems of the Child. (3) Intensive study of the causes, evaluation, and treatment of social, emotional, and behavioral problems of children. Prerequisite: PSY 581 or permission of the instructor.

586 Practicum in School Psychology. (1–2, repeatable to 7) Supervised experience in diagnosis of and consultation for the psychological problems of children in either the local school system or the University Psychology Clinic. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

587 Practicum: Basic Interviewing Skills. (2) Classroom and supervised clinical experience in the conduct of clinical interviews with an emphasis upon communication skills and the development of the therapeutic relationship. Clinical work is done in the University Psychology Clinic. Prerequisites: PSY 577; enrollment limited to students in the school psychology or clinical/community mental health program.

588 Practicum: Interpersonal Processes in Therapy. (2) Provides a review of theory and research on, and supervised experience in, contemporary interpersonal processes as they relate to the client-therapist relationship. Attending to overt and covert communication styles, using the client-therapist interpersonal relationship diagnostically and as a means for intervention, and integrating the interpersonal approach with other theoretical orientations in working with clients of the University Psychology Clinic will be emphasized. Consultation with and referral to other agencies may be included. Prerequisites: Enrollment is limited to students in the Clinical/ Community Mental Health Option who have successfully completed PSY 577 and PSY 587.

589 Practicum: Cognitive and Behavioral Processes in Therapy. (2) Provides a review of theory and research on, and supervised experience in, cognitive and behavioral processes in practice of psychotherapy. Decision-making and treatment planning, cognitive-behavioral techniques and theory, and integration of a cognitive-behavioral approach with other theoretical orientations in working with clients in the University Psychology Clinic will be emphasized. Consultation with and referral to other agencies may be included. Prerequisites: Enrollment is limited to students in the Clinical/Community Mental Health Option who have successfully completed PSY 577, PSY 587, and PSY 588.

590 Introduction to School Psychology. (3) A survey of historical and current topics, issues, and professional problems in school psychology emphasizing the school psychologist's role and function, problems of professional practice, and legal and ethical considerations.

591 Behavioral Consultation. (3) Students will be exposed to various consultation theories used in educational settings to facilitate problem solving. Specific techniques used in behavioral consultation will be taught and practiced. Prerequisite: Three semester hours of PSY 586 or permission of the instructor.

592 Child Neuropsychology. (3) Provide an awareness and understanding of the complexities of brain behavior relationships in children; enhance student’s skills regarding neuropsychological issues. Prerequisite: PSY 581 or permission of the instructor.

593 Intervention with Children and Adolescents. (3) Students will learn to plan, implement, and evaluate interventions appropriate for children and adolescents exhibiting a variety of behavioral, cognitive, educational, medical, and emotional difficulties. Prerequisite: 3 s.h. of PSY 586 or permission of the instructor.

595 Career Assessment in Professional Psychology. (3) Students will become familiar with the process of assessing clients’ vocational and professional interests through the use of both formal assessment instruments and interview. Developmental considerations, as well as issues of cultural sensitivity and gender will be discussed. Approaches to integrating this information into career advising and/or psychotherapy will be explored. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

596 Approaches to Substance Abuse Diagnosis and Treatment. (3) Students will become aware of the multiple theoretical viewpoints available to understand the human substance abuse, as well as the variety of treatment approaches available for addressing these difficulties. Emphases will be placed upon maintaining appropriate scientific skepticism regarding current cultural and professional viewpoints, as well as appreciating the importance of understanding the challenges inherent in the dually diagnosed.Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

599 School Psychology Portfolio. (0) Students in the School Psychology Program are required to compile professional portfolios in which they must integrate information from all of their coursework and practica, and address the ways in which each course relates to their own professional development. Graded S/U. Prerequisite: Completion of at least 3 semester hours of PSY 586.

600 Seminar. (1–3) May be repeated up to twelve hours.

601 Thesis. (3, repeatable to 6) Graded S/U. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PSY 500/PSY 501 sequence or PSY 502 and permission of thesis advisor.

602 Professional Experience. (1–3, repeatable to 5) Practicum work at an advanced level in a setting appropriate to the student's professional goals, i.e., a school system, community mental health center, etc. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

603 School Psychology Internship. (6, repeatable to 12) A one-year full-time supervised professional psychological experience with children of school age in a public school setting under supervision of an individual qualified as a supervising psychologist. Graded S/U. Prerequisite: Open only to those students endorsed for intern approval by WIU School Psychology Program Director. Students enroll during each semester of their internship experience.

604 Internship in Clinical/Community Mental Health. (6, minimum of 12, repeatable to 12) A full-time placement in an approved mental health facility providing advanced graduate students in clinical/community mental health with supervised experience in diagnosis, treatment, community education and program planning, and/or evaluation. Graded S/U. Incompletes will be given until the internship is completed. Prerequisite: Open only to those students endorsed for internship by the WIU Clinical/Community Health Program Director. Students enroll during each semester of their internship experience.

605 Comprehensive Examination in Clinical/Community Mental Health. (0) Graded S/U. Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the clinical/community mental health program and satisfactory completion of 52 semester hours of required course work in this option.

606 Illinois State Accreditation Exam. (0) Students in the School Psychology program are required to complete the state of Illinois Accreditation Exam for School Psychologists and report the score to the program director. Graded S/U. Prerequisite: PSY 603.