Graduate Studies

Zoo and Aquarium Studies
2015-2016

Gainful employment information

Chairperson: Charles Lydeard
Graduate Committee Chairperson: Susan Romano
Coordinator of Certificate Program: Charles Lydeard
Office: Room 250, 60th Street Campus, Moline
Telephone: (309) 762-9481
Fax Number: (309) 764-7172
E-mail: biology@wiu.edu
Website: wiu.edu/biology
Location of Program Offering: Quad Cities, Brookfield Zoo, Shedd Aquarium

Program Description

The post-baccalaureate certificate program in Zoo and Aquarium Studies provides detailed knowledge about the biology of special groups of animals often kept in captivity like dolphins, seals, primates, big cats, canids, large birds, or large reptiles; background in the basic concepts and techniques of animal training; practical management skills required for working with people, budgets, and time at zoos or aquaria; information on policies and regulations that affect the operations of zoos and aquaria; practical, hands-on experience working with animals and with the personnel at a zoo or aquarium; network of people employed at local zoos and aquaria; access to available jobs at zoos or aquaria.

Requirements for Enrollment

Applicants to the Zoo and Aquarium Studies certificate program must have an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) and have a bachelor’s degree in one of the following majors: biology, zoology, ecology, environmental studies, animal science, psychology, or RPTA.  Students must be able to meet the prerequisites of the courses required in the certificate program.

Certificate Requirements

I. Core Courses: 12 s.h.

ZOOL 578 Zoo/Aquarium Practicum (3)
ZOOL 584 Biological Studies in Zoos and Aquaria (3)

ZOOL 553 Animal Behavior (3)
or
ZOOL 585 Animal Training (3)

BIOL 583 Organizational Management in Zoos and Aquaria (3)
or
MST 501 Museum Administration (3)

II. Electives: 6 s.h.

Electives should be selected in consultation with the adviser or Department Chairperson

ZOOL 408G Field Ornithology (3)
ZOOL 409 Field Entomology (3)
ZOOL 410G Ornithology (3)
ZOOL 411G Entomology (3)
ZOOL 412G Mammalogy (3)
ZOOL 413G Herpetology (3)
ZOOL 414G Ichthyology (3)
ZOOL 416G Marine Mammalogy (3)
ZOOL 430G Animal Physiology (3)
ZOOL 451G Animal Ecology (3)
ZOOL 452G Freshwater Biology (3)
ZOOL 460G Parasitology (3)
ZOOL 553 Animal Behavior (3) *if not used as a required course
ZOOL 554 Limnology (3)
ZOOL 561 Fisheries Management (3)
ZOOL 583 Bioacoustics (3)
ZOOL 585 Animal Training (3) *if not used as a required course
ANTH 410G Anthrozoology (3)
BIOL 459G Biogeography (3)
BIOL 503 Biosystematics & Evolution (3)
BIOL 550 Professional Workshop (1-3, repeatable to 12)
BOT 423G Phycology (3)
RPTA 424G Fund Raising and Volunteerism in Leisure Services (3)
RPTA 448G Interpretation of Cultural & Environmental Resources (3)
MST 501 Museum Administration (3) *if not used as a required course
MST 515 Introduction to Museum Education (3)
MST 516 Visitor Studies (3)
MST 599 Special Topics in Museum Studies (3, repeatable under different topics)

TOTAL: 18 s.h.

Course Descriptions

Agricultural Technology Management (AGTM)

410G Anthrozoology. (3) Anthrozoology examines human-animal relationships from the perspective of anthropology with an emphasis on culture and its influence on attitudes toward animals. Prerequisites: ANTH 110 or permission of the instructor; graduate standing in biology.

Biology (BIOL)

459G (cross-listed with GEOG 459G) Biogeography. (3) Study of the geographical distributions of organisms, the evolutionary and ecological processes underlying the patterns of distribution, and the role of biogeography in biological conservation. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better), or permission of the instructor.

503 Biosystematics and Evolution. (3) Philosophy of science, review of evolutionary theory, taxonomy, modern systematics, phylogenetics, macroevolution, and applications of phylogenetic systematics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in biology.

550 Professional Workshop. (1–3, repeatable to 12)

583 Organizational Management in Zoos and Aquaria. (3) This course challenges future professionals in zoos and aquaria to contemplate the multiple disciplines and factors at work in this setting. Students will receive practical information and insight from seasoned professionals using real world examples and best practices from the zoo and aquarium industry. Topics range from personal development, staff and resource management, and the future of zoos and aquaria. Prerequisites: Acceptance in the post-baccalaureate certificate program in Zoo and Aquarium Studies.

Botany (BOT)

BOT 423G Phycology. (3) Morphology, taxonomy, physiology, genetics, and ecology of the algae, particularly freshwater forms. Prerequisites: BOT 200 and ZOOL 200; graduate standing in biology.

Museum Studies (MST)

501 Museum Administration. (3) This course will provide students with an overview of management history, theory and practice focusing on the issues involved in managing a non-profit organization. Topics to be covered include strategic planning; ethics and governance; membership; earned income; and marketing and non-profit finance. Students will complete a finance assignment and an in-depth museum management case study. A variety of topics will be covered including the concepts of project management, team building, group problem solving, and managing change. Case studies of actual projects in museums.

515 Introduction to Museum Education. (3) Public education is at the core of the service that museums provide. This course focuses on all aspects of the educational role of museums from the mission through an exploration of museum learning, the use of new technologies, and the development of public programs and evaluation.

516 Visitor Studies. (3) The purpose of this course is to introduce evaluative methods used to design and implement museum visitor studies. Students will explore the uses of front-end, formative, and summative evaluation approaches to better understand visitor experience and improve museum program offerings.

599 Special Topics in Museum Studies. (3, repeatable under different special topics) A special topics course acknowledges the changing environment of museums. This course focuses on emerging issues in museum professional practice. Students will explore the chosen topic through current research, theory, and practice in museums. Practical application of ideas will take place in museum settings.

Recreation, Park and Tourism Administration (RPTA)

424G Fund Raising and Volunteerism in Leisure Services. (3) A study of the principles and practices associated with fund raising and utilization of volunteers in public as well as private nonprofit leisure service organizations.  Prerequisite: RPTA 322 or permission of instructor.

448G Interpretation of Cultural and Environmental Resources. (3) Develops a basic understanding for interpretation of natural, environmental and cultural resources. Includes philosophy and techniques. Field trip and laboratory charge. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

Zoology (ZOOL)

408G Field Ornithology. (3) A course devoted to the study of birds, emphasizing study techniques used in natural environments. Topics covered will include reproductive behavior, ecology, communication, systematic, and conservation. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

409 Field Entomology. (3) A course in insect biology, emphasizing sampling techniques and study of insects in natural environments, as well as insect identification, ecology, and conservation biology. Prerequisites: BOT 200 (C grade or better) and ZOOL 200 (C grade or better).

410G Ornithology. (3) Identification, biology, ecology, and life histories of birds. Prerequisites: BOT 200 and ZOOL 200; graduate standing in biology.

411G Entomology. (3) Principles of entomology, including classification, general biology, and morphology.  Prerequisites: BOT 200 and ZOOL 200; graduate standing in biology.

412G Mammalogy. (3) Identification, classification, distribution, and life histories of mammals. Prerequisites: BOT 200 and ZOOL 200; graduate standing in biology.

413G Herpetology. (3) Identification, classification, distribution, and biology of reptiles and amphibians. Prerequisites: BOT 200 and ZOOL 200; graduate standing in biology.

414G Ichthyology. (3) Identification, classification, distribution, and life histories of fishes. Prerequisites: BOT 200 and ZOOL 200; graduate standing in biology.

416G Marine Mammalogy. (3) Survey of marine mammals with emphasis on taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology, and conservation. Laboratory includes observational study of marine mammals at the Shedd Aquarium. Prerequisites: BOT 200 and ZOOL 200; graduate standing in biology or related field.

430G Animal Physiology. (3) Primarily mammalian physiology, concerning the functions of nervous muscular, respiratory, digestive, excretory, reproductive, and endocrine systems. Prerequisites: BOT 200, ZOOL 200 and one year of chemistry; graduate standing in biology.

451G Animal Ecology. (3) Relationships of animals in their environment. Prerequisites: BOT 200 and ZOOL 200; graduate standing in biology.

452G Freshwater Biology. (3) Common freshwater organisms and some of their relationships to one another, to their environment, and to humans. Prerequisites: BOT 200 and ZOOL 200; graduate standing in biology.

460G Parasitology. (3) The study of animal parasites. Prerequisites: BOT 200 and ZOOL 200 ; graduate standing in biology.

553 Animal Behavior. (3) The activities and responses of animals which facilitate survival under natural conditions. Prerequisites: Graduate standing in biology.

554 Limnology. (3) The study of inland waters and their biological, physical and chemical parameters.  Outside field trips required. Prerequisite: At least 18 hours of biology, introductory chemistry and physics; graduate standing in biology.

561 Fisheries Management. (3) Techniques of study, maintenance, and improvement of fisheries resources. Prerequisites: ZOOL 414 or permission of the instructor; graduate standing in biology.

578 Zoo/Aquarium Practicum. (3) Gain practical experience at organizations that hold captive animals, such as zoos, aquaria, oceanaria, or animal rehabilitation facilities.  Experience includes legal issues, ethical issues, husbandry standards and methods, research methods, organizational structure and policy, and facilities management. Students must work a minimum of 120 hours at the facility. Graded S/U.  Prerequisites: Acceptance in the post-baccalaureate certificate program in Zoo and Aquarium Studies.

583 Bioacoustics. (3) Survey of animal adaptations for producing and receiving sound. The effects of human-generated noise on wildlife is described. Techniques for recording sounds, and measuring amplitude and frequency, and time characteristics of sounds are demonstrated. Students will make recordings of animals in the field. Analysis of animal sounds using computer programs is required. Prerequisite: One year of college physics, or permission of the instructor.

584 Biological Studies in Zoo and Oceanaria. (3) This course discusses the types of studies suited to animals in a captive environment, current research trends, and new techniques being applied to animals in a zoo or oceanarium setting.  Long-term monitoring of animals with known life histories provides unique research opportunities.  Course covers topics on a variety of vertebrates and emphasizes research conducted at local zoos or oceanaria.  Student research project required.  Prerequisites: At least one year of college-level biology, senior biology major, or permission of the instructor.

585 Animal Training. (3) This course discusses concepts of training in a variety of animals.  Techniques for observing behavior, operant conditioning, research, and husbandry/medical training are described.  Laboratories include training demonstrations on animals at the Shedd Aquarium. Prerequisites: At least one year of college-level biology or psychology, senior biology major, or permission of the instructor.