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Business Administration - 2012-2013

Admission | Courses | Program | Requirements |Profile

Director of MBA Program: John Drea
Department Office: Stipes Hall 101
Department Telephone: (309) 298-2442 Fax: (309) 298-1039
E-mail:
JT-Drea@wiu.edu
Website: wiu.edu/cbt/
Location of Program Offering: Macomb, Quad Cities

Graduate Faculty
Professors

  • Chandra S. Amaravadi, Ph.D., University of Arizona
  • Ronald J. Bauerly, D.B.A., Southern Illinois University
  • James Brakefield, Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo
  • Dave DeBoeuf, Ph.D., Louisiana State University
  • Joseph J. Dobson, Ph.D., Washington University
  • John T. Drea, D.B.A., Southern Illinois University
  • John A. Elfrink, Ph.D., St. Louis University
  • Mikhail Grachev, Ph.D., Russian Academy of Sciences
  • Don T. Johnson, Ph.D., University of Georgia
  • Tej K. Kaul, Ph.D., Birla Institute of Technology
  • James T. Kenny, Ph.D., Oklahoma State University
  • Peppi M. Kenny, Ph.D., Oklahoma State University
  • In Lee, Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Douglas J. March, J.D., University of Illinois
  • Gordon P. Rands, Ph.D., University of Minnesota
  • Rajeev Sawhney, Ph.D., University of Western Ontario
  • Mandeep Singh, D.B.A, Southern Illinois University
  • Emeric Solymossy, Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University
  • Ann D. Walsh, Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Associate Professors

  • Kasing Man, Ph.D., University of Chicago
  • James L. Patterson, Ph.D., Michigan State University

Assistant Professor

  • Carrie A. Belsito, Ph.D., Texas A & M University
  • Kanu Priya, Ph.D., University of Georgia

Associate Graduate Faculty
Professors

  • Adee Athiyaman, Ph.D. Hong Kong Polytechnic
  • Barton Jennings, Ph. D., University of Tennessee

Associate Professors

  • Craig Conrad, D.B.A., Louisiana Technical University
  • Farideh Dehkordi-Vakil, Ph.D., University of Iowa
  • Douglas A. Druckenmiller, Ph.D., Kent State University
  • Scott W. Hansen, Ph.D., Oklahoma State University
  • Hongbok Lee, Ph.D., University of Missouri
  • Padmaja Pillutla, Ph.D., Washington State University
  • Susan Stewart, Ph.D., University of Tennessee
  • Michael Tracey, Ph.D., University of Toledo
  • Xiang Yi, Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Assistant Professors

  • Mark Bernards, Ph.D., Michigan State University
  • Ryan J. Hunt, J.D., Drake University
  • Yin-Chi Liao, Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • Anna Valeva, Ph.D., University of California-Santa Barbara
  • Rodney M. Walter, Jr., M.B.A., Butler University
  • Tae S. Yang, Ph.D., University of Texas-Arlington

Program Description

The College of Business and Technology offers graduate work leading to the Master of Business Administration (MBA).

Master of Business Administration courses are offered by the Departments of Management and Marketing; Accounting and Finance; Economics and Decision Sciences; and the School of Computer Sciences.

The mission of the MBA program at Western Illinois University is to prepare individuals for leadership and socially responsible managerial roles in an interdependent, multicultural, and diverse business world.

Integrated Baccalaureate and Master’s Degree Programs

Go to wiu.edu/graduate_studies/2012_2013_catalog/integrated_programs.php for details and program offerings.

Admission Requirements

Applicants for admission must meet the minimum requirements of the School of Graduate Studies for degree-seeking students. The Director of the MBA program and the MBA advisory committee will review applications and approve candidates for admission based on undergraduate GPA, GMAT score, and other evidence of preparedness. Applicants with bachelor’s degrees in business from AACSB-International accredited institutions with cumulative undergraduate grade point averages of 3.60 or higher (on a 4.0 scale) will not be required to take the GMAT exam.

Registration in graduate business courses is restricted to students who have been accepted into a graduate program. Students pursuing graduate degrees other than the MBA must meet all course prerequisites prior to registering for graduate business courses; nondegree graduate students are not permitted to register for any graduate business courses.

Degree Requirements

The MBA program at Western Illinois University is available to students with both business and nonbusiness backgrounds. Depending upon academic performance, students with business degrees from AACSB–International accredited schools may progress directly into the MBA courses. Students without business degrees or with degrees from non-AACSB–International accredited schools may be required to take one or more background courses to assure adequate preparation for advanced study.

Required Background courses (or equivalent):

ACCT 307 Accounting for Managers and Management Decisions (or ACCT 201 Principles of Financial Accounting and ACCT 202 Principles of Managerial Accounting)
ECON 408G Economic Theory for Decision Makers (or ECON 231 Principles of Macroeconomics I and ECON 232 Principles of Macroeconomics II)
FIN 311 Introduction to Finance
IS 340 Management Information Systems
MGT 349 Management and Organizational Behavior
MKTG 327 Marketing Principles
STAT 171 General Elementary Statistics

Specific background courses may be waived on the basis of a student’s prior completion of equivalent course content or relevant experience. Courses must have been completed within five years preceding entrance into the MBA program with a grade of C or better and with an average GPA in the background courses of 2.75, from a recognized college or university. It is assumed that entering students will possess necessary mathematical, communication, and computer skills.

I. Core Courses: 18 s.h.

ACCT 547 Corporate Financial Reporting and Analysis (3)
DS 533 Applied Business Forecasting and Planning (3)
Or
MGT 540 Applied Business Research (3)
ECON 538 Economics for Managers (3)
FIN 565 Financial Management: Theory and Practice (3)
IS 524 Corporate Information Systems (3)
MKTG 576 Decision Making for Global Markets (3)

BAT 611 MBA Outcomes (0)

II. Directed Elective: 3 s.h.
III. Concentration Courses (department determination) 9 s.h.
IV. Integrative Course: 3 s.h.

MGT 590 Strategic Management (3)

TOTAL PROGRAM: 33 s.h.

Students will select concentrations to prepare them for a specific business specialty or career path. The concentrations will be tailored to student needs and will be drawn from College of Business and Technology departments and related areas in consultation with the MBA adviser and MBA Program Committee. Detailed information on courses and offerings are available from the MBA adviser.

Course Descriptions

Accountancy (See Accountancy)
Agricultural Economics (AGEC)

442G Marketing Grain and Livestock Products. (3) Basis hedging for grains, feeds, livestock, and meat. Three hours lecture. Prerequisite: AGEC 333.

443G Agricultural Finance. (3) Financing problems and opportunities in agriculture. Sources of finance, financing costs, analysis of investment opportunities, financial management and estate planning. Three hours lecture. Prerequisite: AGRI 220 or ECON 232.

447G Commodity Markets and Futures Trading. (3) Futures trading institutions, technical analysis, multiple hedging, and speculation. Three hours lecture.

449G Advanced Farm Management. (3) Effective combination of resources in agribusiness planning and management. Emphasis placed on use of available agribusiness management software. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisite: AGEC 349.

455G Advanced Agricultural Marketing. (3) Options on futures, applied research methods, current events. Three hours lecture. Prerequisites: AGEC 442 and 447.

457G Market Profile®; (3) Use of the Chicago Board of Trade Market Profile®; and Liquidity Data Bank®; for hedging and speculation. Not available to students who have completed AGEC 459. Three hours lecture. Prerequisite: AGEC 447.

559 Food: Safety, Risk, and Technology. (3) Integration of ethics in public policy and food technology to manage risks in the food supply. A survey of risk factors and management strategies (including HACCP) will be conducted. Identity preservation and consumer acceptance will be addressed.

620 Internship in Agribusiness. (1—6) This course will integrate agribusiness theories with applications to actual business practice. Students will be exposed to a variety of positions within the business firm during the semester. A faculty coordinator and an executive of the hosting firm will supervise all internships. Analytic reports of work accomplished by each student will be presented to the coordinator. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: ECON 508 or equivalent, completion of six hours of 500-level agricultural economics courses, and written approval of Department Chairperson.

Business and Technology (BAT)

600 Global Study. (1–6, repeatable to 6) Integrates the study of international business and /or technology with international travel for graduate students. Focuses on preparing students for the global environment of the twenty-first century. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

611 MBA Outcomes. (0) Requires each MBA student to demonstrate her/his performance on selected learning goals for the MBA program. The course must be taken near the end of the MBA program. Graded S/U. Prerequisite: Completion and/or co-enrollment in at least 24 s.h. of graduate level business courses.

Business Law (B L)

484G Legal Environment of International Business. (3) An introduction to the laws regulating international trade and commerce, including international and comparative law, and the legal and ethical environment of international business. Course examines the special risks of international business and how to minimize those risks. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

600 Independent Research. (1–3) Independent research and study of selected topics in Business Law. Prerequisites: Permission of the Department Chairperson.

620 Business Law Internship. (1–6) Integrates legal theory with application to actual practice of law. Students are exposed to a variety of positions within the law office during the semester. All internships are supervised by a faculty coordinator and a lawyer in the law office. Analytic reports of work accomplished by each student are presented to the coordinator. Graded S/U only. Prerequisite: Written permission of the Department Chairperson.

Decision Sciences (DS)

435G Applied Data Mining for Business Decision-Making. (3) This course provides an introduction to data mining methods for business applications. Students will learn the basics of data selection, preparation, statistical modeling and analysis aimed at the identification of knowledge fulfilling organizational objectives. Prerequisite: STAT 171 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

490G Statistical Software for Data Management and Decision Making. (3, repeatable to 6 for different titles) This course provides students with the basic concepts of statistical computing. Students will gain experience with statistical software packages, such as SAS or SPSS, and their applications. Methods of data preparation and validation, analysis, and reporting will be covered. Prerequisite: STAT 171 or equivalent, or PSY 223, or SOC 232, or POLS 284, or permission of department chairperson.

503 Business Statistics for Managerial Decision Making. (3) A survey of statistical methods useful for managerial decision making. Topics discussed include descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, statistical inference, analysis of variance, regression, contingency tables, and nonparametric statistics.

523 Managerial Decision Making and Problem Solving. (3) Applications of management science tools and techniques for effective decision making with emphasis on model building. Topics include PERT/CPM, transportation models, linear, goal, integer and dynamic programming, and queuing theory. Prerequisite: DS 503.

533 Applied Business Forecasting and Planning. (3) A survey of the basic forecasting methods and techniques essential for modern managers. Topics include moving average and decomposition techniques, ARIMA processes, regression techniques, and technological methods such as Delphi and S-curves. Prerequisite: DS 503.

535 Applied Data Mining for Business. (3) This course provides an introduction to date mining methods and techniques for business applications. Students will learn the basics of data preparation, information retrieval, statistical modeling and analysis aimed at the production of decision rules for specific business goals. Prerequisites: DS 503 or permission of the instructor.

600 Independent Research. (1–3) Independent research and study of selected topics in decision sciences. Prerequisites: Completion of six graduate hours in decision sciences and permission of the Department Chairperson.

620 Decision Sciences Internship. (1–6, not repeatable) Integrates decision sciences theories with application to actual business practices. Students are exposed to a variety of positions within the business firm during the semester. All internships are supervised by a faculty coordinator and an executive in the business firm. Analytic reports of work accomplished by each student are presented to the coordinator. Graded S/U only. Prerequisites: Completion of six hours of decision sciences courses and written permission of the Department Chairperson.

Economics (See Economics)
Finance (FIN)

496G Futures Options and Options Markets. (3) The course presents a foundation in futures and options contracts examining the types of contracts, structure of the markets, pricing of contracts, and applications in risk management. Prerequisites: FIN 311 or 331, or permission of the instructor.

515 Finance for Managers. (3) The development and study of financial concepts and practices employed by the financial manager in acquiring and administering capital. Topics include financial markets, time value of money, financial planning and analysis, working capital management, and long-term investment and financial decisions. Intended for graduate students with no previous background in finance. Prerequisites: ACCT 307 or equivalent.

535 Real Estate Investment and Valuation. (3) A study of the real estate industry and markets. Concentration is on factors affecting the value of real estate and techniques for measuring value.

555 Investment Management. (3) An introductory course in investment management designed to provide the conceptual basis for investment decision making. Topics will include how the security markets work, techniques of security analysis, valuation theory, and introduction to modern portfolio theory.

565 Financial Management: Theory and Practice. (3) An advanced course in corporate financial management intended to provide a conceptual framework for analyzing the major types of decisions made by financial executives. Topics dealing with the acquisition and administration of corporate capital will be discussed in an applied setting stressing their relevance to practical problems in financial management. Case studies and team written reports are used to provide students with an opportunity to apply known concepts and principles to realistic situations.

585 International Financial Management. (3) An application of corporate finance and investment theory to the international arena. Special topics include the environment of international financial management, the management of foreign exchange risk, foreign investment analysis, and sources of international funds. Students will also be taught efficiency conditions of international markets, the international payment system, and international banking.

595 Financial Derivatives. (3) An in-depth examination of financial derivatives including forward, future, and option contracts. Topics will include trading strategies based on fundamental analysis, pricing rules, valuation, and the swaps market.

600 Independent Research. (1–3) Independent research and study of selected topics in finance. Prerequisites: Six semester hours of graduate course work in finance and permission of the Department Chairperson.

620 Finance Internship. (1–6, not repeatable) Integrates finance theories with application to actual business practice. Students are exposed to a variety of positions within the business firm during the semester. All internships are supervised by a faculty coordinator and an executive in the business firm. Analytic reports of work accomplished by each student are presented to the coordinator. Graded S/U only. Prerequisites: Six semester hours of graduate course work in finance and written approval of the Department Chairperson.

Human Resource Management (HRM)

532 Seminar in Human Resource Management. (3) Concepts drawn from various disciplines (such as psychology, management, law, and statistics) are applied to human resource management activities (such as staffing, training, appraisal, and compensation) to improve human resource outcomes (such as performance, turnover, satisfaction, and costs). Emphasizes case work and readings.

600 Independent Research. (1–3) Independent research and study of selected topics in human resource management. Prerequisites: Completion of six graduate hours in human resource management and permission of the Department Chairperson.

620 Human Resource Management Internship. (1–6) Integrates human resource management theories with application to actual business practices. Students are exposed to a variety of positions within the business firm during the semester. All internships are supervised by a faculty coordinator and an executive in the business firm. Analytic reports of work accomplished by each student are presented to the coordinator. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: Completion of six hours of human resource management courses and written permission of the Department Chairperson.

Information Systems (IS)

514 An Introduction to Information Management. (3) A survey of topics in information management/management information systems, including an introduction to decision support systems with particular emphasis on model management systems, executive information systems, and intelligent systems.

520 Business Communications in the U.S. (3) This business/managerial communication course focuses on advanced written and oral communication techniques used in U.S. companies. The course emphasizes the effective use of technology and language as a means to communicate. (This course will not count towards MBA credit).

524 Corporate Information Systems. (3) A survey of information systems in organizations including their role, associated technologies, functionality, development, impacts, and management.

544 Human Factors in Information Systems. (3) Behavioral issues in the design, implementation, and operation of automated information systems with emphasis on form/function linkages with human performance.

554 Managing Information Technology. (3) This course addresses the role, implications, and relevance of information technology for today's business managers and professionals. Topics include management issues concerning information technology strategy and planning; enterprise wide process innovation and re-engineering; information infrastructure; technology assessment, management of the application programs portfolio, operations and controls; and interorganization and transnational perspectives are also included.

574 International Issues in Information Technology Management. (3) This course is designed to expose students to the current issues in global information technology (IT) management. This course will examine the international business environment and how information systems (IS) and technology can be effectively utilized for the successful management of business enterprises in that environment. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

600 Independent Research. (1–3) Independent research and study of selected topics in information systems. Prerequisites: Permission of the Department Chairperson.

620 Information Management Internship. (1–6, not repeatable) Integrates management information systems theories with application to actual business practice. Students are exposed to a variety of positions within the business firm during the semester. All internships are supervised by a faculty coordinator and an executive in the business firm. Analytic reports of work accomplished by each student are presented to the coordinator. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: Completion of six hours of information management courses and written permission of the Department Chairperson.

Management (MGT)

445G Organization Development. (3) Examines current models and methods for bringing about change in organizations. Emphasizes understanding organizations as complex adaptive systems. Provides knowledge and practical tools to promote and maintain system viability across the dynamic contexts facing modern organizations. Prerequisite: MGT 350 or permission of the instructor.

474G Small Business Management. (3) This course examines issues in running a small business. Topics include: problems, advantages, and disadvantages of operating and maintaining a small business. A complete business plan will be prepared. Cases, interviews, and hands-on methods are used. Prerequisites: MGT 349.

481G Management and Society: Ethics and Social Responsibility. (3) A study of relationships between business, government, society, and individuals. Topics include ethics, social responsibility, regulation, globalization, and managing ethical and social issues of concern to various stakeholders and the natural environment. Prerequisite: MGT 349 or permission of the instructor.

483G Managing Organizations for Environmental Sustainability. (3) Studies how businesses and other organizations can become more environmentally sustainable, emphasizing sustainability management practices/methods. Includes background coverage of sustainability, ecological principles, environmental problems and philosophies, organizations’ environmental impacts, and government policy approaches. Prerequisite: MGT 340 or permission of instructor.

510 Ethical, Social, and Legal Responsibilities of Managers. (3) A course designed to integrate three managerial responsibilities essential to maintaining a responsive organization in the contemporary business environment. In addition to the ethical, social, and legal dimensions of the modern business organization, political and historical factors affecting decision making will be examined. Specific issues that will be addressed may include corporate social responsibility models, personal and organizational ethics, international trade and other global issues, employee rights, corporate governance, business and the natural ecology, and the civil and criminal liabilities of businesses and their executives.

520 Organization Behavior and Leadership. (3) Examines theory and research on the behavioral and conceptual skills accounting for managerial effectiveness in modern complex organizations, with emphasis on leadership skill building. Special topics include understanding power and influence processes, managerial communication responsibilities, empowerment and motivational strategies, developing productive teams, managing culture, the human implications of technology, organizational change and development, and creating learning organizations, among other current topics.

540 Applied Business Research. (3) A general outline of the methods of conducting research in business, including research design, data collection and analysis, and presentation of results. The emphasis is on the methodology of conducting applied business research. Prerequisite: DS 503 or equivalent.

570 International Management. (3) A team-taught course which examines the management practices in an increasingly competitive global environment. Topics include national differences in culture, the internationalization process, global strategy formulation and implementation, and the impact of globalization on the operation of an organization.

590 Strategic Management. (3) The capstone business course designed to develop students' skills which emphasize the integration of the various business areas toward managing the firm as a total unit. Topics include environmental analysis, competition pressures, global market considerations, diversification, decision making, organizational linkages, corporate culture, and formulation and implementation of strategy. The approach taken is that of general management whose primary responsibilities encompass the development, operation, and maintenance of the entire firm. Prerequisite: MBA student near the end of MBA program, or permission of the MBA Program Director.

600 Independent Research. (1–3) Independent research and study of selected topics in management. Prerequisites: Completion of six graduate hours in Management and permission of the Department Chairperson.

620 Management Internship. (1–6) Integrates management theories with application to actual business practice. Students are exposed to a variety of positions within the business firm during the semester. All internships are supervised by a faculty coordinator and an executive in the business firm. Analytic reports of work accomplished by each student are presented to the coordinator. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: Completion of six hours of management courses and written permission of the Department Chairperson.

Marketing (MKTG)

516 Marketing Strategy and Functions. (3) Analysis of integrated marketing efforts targeted at consumer and industrial markets. Training in information tools, market segmentation processes, development of strategies (combination of product, pricing, distribution, and promotion plans), plus coordination of internal and external resources for a goal-oriented and controlled plan implementation.

526 Applied Business Research. (3) A general outline of the methods of conducting research in business, including research design, data collection, and analysis, and presentation of results. Emphasis is on the methodology of conducting applied business research. Prerequisite: DS 503 or equivalent.

536 Buyer Behavior. (3) Exploring the basis of buyer behavior from a marketing management perspective. Emphasis is on the application of behavioral science theories, models, and techniques in the development of marketing strategies.

566 Marketing Decision Making. (3) Analysis of how different industries organize and realize their marketing efforts based on actual company cases. Basic quality orientation of course is combined with quantitative inputs where needed to assure a realistic learning exercise. All topics address the specific needs of combining good marketing planning with organizational structure to optimally serve customer needs and expectations. Not available to students with credit in MKTG 576.

576 Decision Making for Global Markets. (3) Integrative analysis and study of ethical marketing decision making strategies of industries and organizations in the international/global environment. All topics emphasize an integrative approach of world class marketing planning with organizational structure to optimally serve customer needs and expectations at home and abroad. Not available to students with credit in MKTG 566 or MKTG 586.

586 World Markets and International Marketing. (3) Marketing decision making in the international/global environment. Identifying, formulating, and adjusting marketing strategies in diverse cultural, geographical, and developmental contexts through the use of cases. Not available to students with credit in MKTG 576.

600 Independent Research. (1–3) Independent research and study of selected topics in marketing. Prerequisites: Six semester hours of graduate course work in marketing and permission of the Department Chairperson.

620 Marketing Internship. (1–6, not repeatable) Integrates marketing theories with application to actual business practices. Students are exposed to a variety of positions within the business firm during the semester. All internships are supervised by a faculty coordinator and an executive in the business firm. Analytic reports of work accomplished by each student are presented to the coordinator. Graded S/U only. Prerequisites: Six semester hours of graduate course work in marketing and written approval of the Department Chairperson.

Operations Management (OM)

457G Project Management. (3) Examines principles of selecting, organizing, staffing, controlling, and directing projects in operations/supply chain management. Topics include developing cross-functional teams, leading and mentoring team members, applying critical thinking methods while meeting outcomes and objectives, CPM/PERT techniques, and utilizing project management software. Prerequisites: SCM 211 or OM 352 or permission of the instructor.

511 Operations Management. (3) Focuses on value-adding transformation processes in supply and distribution chains for both service and manufacturing organizations. Topics include lean operations, Six Sigma, quality management, cost-volume analysis, materials management, and interfaces with other organization functions. Requires competency in algebra and statistics.

551 Integrated Global Operations Management. (3) Deals with the dynamics of providing high quality goods and services in a rapidly changing and exceedingly competitive global marketplace. The focus is on designing, managing, and operating value-adding transformation processes to support a truly integrated supply chain to satisfy customer demand. Substantial emphasis is placed on total quality management and lean operations as viewed from both the operations and supply chain management executive perspectives.

600 Independent Research. (1–3) Independent research and study of selected topics in operations management. Prerequisites: Permission of the Department Chairperson.

620 Operations Management Internship. (1–6) Integrates Operations Management theories with application to actual business practices. Students are exposed to a variety of positions within the business firm during the semester. All internships are supervised by a faculty coordinator and an executive in the business firm. Analytic reports of work accomplished by each student are presented to the coordinator. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: 6 s.h. in graduate OM courses and permission of the Department Chairperson.

Supply Chain Management (SCM)

465G Supply Chain Risk Management. (3) Examination of effective risk management in global supply chains. Topics include: identification of risk sources, contingency planning, risk and disaster mitigation and recovery, responses to government regulatory, sustainability, societal, and stakeholder demands, and financial aspects of managing supply chain risk. Prerequisites: SCM 340 or SCM 411 or SCM 453 or permission of the instructor.

529 Worldwide Logistics and E-Commerce. (3) Introduction to worldwide logistics that includes both domestic and global logistics. Topics covered include transportation, warehousing, inventory control, material handling, packaging, documentation, terms of trade, and other domestic and global issues. E-commerce is also introduced as it pertains to supply chain management and especially logistics

531 Supply Management. (3) A survey course in supply chain management from the perspective of the operations and/or supply chain manager. Students will examine effective supply chain strategies involving logistics, transportation, physical distribution, customer service, order processing, inventory management, materials flow, warehousing, distribution network design, procurement and supply management, supply base risk management, and global logistics. Prerequisite: OM 511 or equivalent.

539 Transportation and Warehouse Management. (3) A survey course covering the fields of transportation and warehousing. Transportation topics include modes of transportation, pricing, regulation, traffic management, and other special issues. Topics discussed in warehousing include receiving, handling, storage, and interfaces with purchasing, inventory control, transportation, and operations. Prerequisite: SCM 531 or permission of instructor.

549 Strategic Procurement and Sourcing. (3) Survey of direct and indirect procurement in service and manufacturing industries. Topics include supply base management, supply risk, supplier selection and evaluation, sourcing strategy, supplier quality, global sourcing, contracting, purchasing law and ethics, sustainability, lean procurement, and total cost analysis. Prerequisite: SCM 531 or permission of instructor.

559 Cost Negotiations. (3) An examination of the various styles, tactics and strategies used to achieve successful negotiations. Cost and prices are analyzed regarding both goods and services in establishing a fair and reasonable price with suppliers. Negotiating exercises, cost exercises and mock negotiations are used to integrate theory with reality. Prerequisites: SCM 531 or permission of instructor.

599 Seminar in Supply Chain Management. (3) An examination of current challenges and concepts in supply chain management. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, regulation versus deregulation, small and disadvantaged suppliers, cost reduction, reducing cycle time, lean manufacturing, supplier audits, and integrating the supply chain. Prerequisites: SCM 531 or permission of instructor.

600 Independent Research. (1–3) Independent research and study of selected topics in supply chain management. Prerequisites: 6 s.h. in graduate SCM coursework and permission of the Department Chairperson.

620 Supply Chain Management Internship. (1–6) Integrates supply chain management theories with application to actual business practices. Students are exposed to a variety of positions within the business firm during the semester. All internships are supervised by a faculty coordinator and an executive in the business firm. Analytic reports of work accomplished by each student are presented to the coordinator. Graded S/U only. Prerequisites: 6 s.h. in graduate SCM coursework and permission of the Department Chairperson.