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History - 2010-2011

Admission | Courses | Program | Requirements | Profile

Department Chairperson:  Virginia R. Boynton
Graduate Committee Chairperson: Greg Hall
Department Office:  Morgan Hall 438
Department Telephone: (309) 298-1053 Fax: (309) 298-2540
Department E-mail: History1@wiu.edu
Website:  wiu.edu/history
Location of Program Offering: 

Graduate Faculty
Professors

  • Virginia R. Boynton, Ph.D., The Ohio State University
  • Scott W. Palmer, Ph.D., University of Illinois

Associate Professors

  • Lee Brice, Ph.D., University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
  • Peter Cole, Ph.D., Georgetown University
  • Richard Filipink, Ph.D., SUNY at Buffalo
  • Greg Hall, Ph.D., Washington State University
  • Virginia G. Jelatis, Ph.D., University of Minnesota
  • Walter Kretchik, Ph.D., University of Kansas
  • Jennifer McNabb, Ph.D., University of Colorado-Boulder
  • Edward Woell, Ph.D., Marquette University 

Assistant Professors

  • Barclay Key, Ph.D., University of Florida
  • Roberto Mazza, Ph.D., University of London
  • Febe Pamonag, Ph.D., University of Alberta
  • Timothy M. Roberts, Ph.D., University of Oxford

Associate Graduate Faculty
Assistant Professor

  • Ute Chamberlin, Ph.D., Arizona State University

  Program Description

The Department of History offers work leading to the Master of Arts degree. The program is designed to introduce the student to historical research and broad areas of historical studies. The requirements are highly flexible. Programs of study can be arranged to serve as the basis for further graduate study, to meet the immediate and changing needs of teachers and other educators, and to prepare students for positions in industry, business, and government.

  Admission Requirements

Students selecting history as a graduate major should have completed a minimum of 18 semester hours of undergraduate work in history and must have a cumulative undergraduate GPA of at least 2.75 (based on all hours attempted) or a GPA of at least 3.0 for the last two years of undergraduate study.

  Degree Requirements

The Master of Arts degree in history may be earned by one of three plans of study.

Plan I. Thesis

HIST 500 Methods of Historical Research (1 s.h.)
Major field of study (15 s.h.)
Minor field of study (6 s.h.)
Electives ( 3 s.h.)
HIST 600 Thesis Research (3 s.h.)
HIST 601 Thesis (3 s.h.)

Courses taken to satisfy requirements 2-4 must include two research seminars.

TOTAL PROGRAM: 31 s.h.

Plan II. Special Project

HIST 500 Methods of Historical Research (1 s.h.) Major field of study (15 s.h.)
Minor field of study (9 s.h.)
Electives (3–5 s.h.)
HIST 599 Special Project (4–6 s.h.)
HIST 699 Non-thesis Oral Exam (0 s.h.)

Courses taken to satisfy requirements 2-4 must include at least one reading seminar in the major field and two research seminars.

TOTAL PROGRAM: 34 s.h.

Plan III. General

HIST 500 Methods of Historical Research (1 s.h.)
Major field of study (18 s.h.)
Minor field of study  (9 s.h.)
Electives (9 s.h.)
HIST 699 Non-thesis Oral Exam (0 s.h.)

Courses taken to satisfy requirements 2-4 must include at least one reading seminar in the major field and two research seminars.

TOTAL PROGRAM: 37 s.h.

An oral examination will be conducted following the completion of all course work and requirements.

The major field of study will ordinarily be in United States history or European history. It may be in another area if approved by the Graduate Committee. The minor field of study may be in United States history, European history, or non‑Western history. It may also be in another related discipline or disciplines with the approval of the Graduate Committee.

No more than 15 hours may be taken in extension courses, except in the Quad Cities Graduate Center. Up to nine hours in a 32 semester hour program may be transferred from another graduate school upon the approval of the Departmental Graduate Committee. In no case shall the total of the extension and transfer courses exceed 15 hours (except in Quad Cities extension courses). All such hours are subject to the approval of the Graduate Committee.

  Course Descriptions

History (HIST)

400G Soviet Union, 1917-1991. (3) An intensive study of political, diplomatic, economic, social, and cultural developments in the Soviet Union from the Bolshevik revolution to the USSR’s collapse.  Prerequisite: HIST 126 or 399, or permission of the instructor.

401G American Diplomatic History. (3) Foreign relations with emphasis on the period from the war with Spain to the present, stressing the behavior of the United States as a world power. Prerequisite: HIST 106 or permission of the instructor.

412G American Colonial History. (3) A history of the discovery, settlement, and development of the American colonies to 1763. Prerequisite: HIST 105 or permission of the instructor.

413G American Revolution and the New Nation. (3) A study of developments which caused the Revolution; examination of the War of Independence, the Confederation, the federal Constitution, and subsequent events to 1800. Prerequisite: HIST 105 or permission of the instructor.

414G Early American Republic, 1800-1848. (3) An intensive study of the development of the United States from 1800 to 1848, emphasizing the development of political culture within the expanding nation, among post-revolutionary Americans. Prerequisite: HIST 105 or permission of the instructor.

415G Civil War and Reconstruction. (3) An intensive study of the political, social, economic, military, and diplomatic history of the period 1848 to 1877, focusing on the causes, course, and consequences of the Civil War (1861-1865). Prerequisite: HIST 105 or permission of the instructor.

416G America in Transition, 1877‑1914. (3) An examination of the forces transforming America from Reconstruction to the Wilson administration. Prerequisite: HIST 106 or permission of the instructor.

418G Emergence of Modern America, 1914–1945. (3) A study of American history from World War I to the end of World War II. Prerequisite: HIST 106 or permission of the instructor.

419G Recent America, 1945 to Present. (3) An examination of American history from the end of World War II to the present. Prerequisite: HIST 106 or permission of the instructor.

420G Capstone Seminar: Illinois History. (3) A study of periods and themes in the history of Illinois including social, political, economic, cultural, and environmental change. Prerequisite: HIST 105, 106 and 201; ENG 280; or permission of instructor.

421G Presidential Assassination and Political Murder in American History. (3) A study of facts, myths, and controversies surrounding the murder and attempted murder of presidents and political leaders, with emphasis on the Kennedy assassination. Prerequisites: HIST 105 or 106, or permission of the instructor.

422G American Environmental History. (3) A history of Americans’ interaction with their natural environment from pre-contact to the present with special emphasis on the last two hundred years. Prerequisite: HIST 105 or 106, or permission of the instructor.

423G The Vietnam War and Its Times. (3) A seminar on the Vietnam War, with particular emphasis on domestic, social, and political emphasis on domestic, social, and political aspects during the 1960's.  Research in primary sources will be required. Prerequisite: HIST 106 or permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: HIST 106 or permission of the instructor.

426G The Enlightenment, 1721-1784. (3) Advanced study of a cultural revolution in the Atlantic world: a “republic” of philosophers, ideas, and debates; social institutions promoting reform; emergence of new media, mass literacy, public opinion, and private sentiment; and the broader context in which these flourished. Prerequisite: HIST 126 or permission of the instructor.

427G French Revolution and Napoleon. (3) A detailed examination of the period from 1789 to 1815 in Europe. Prerequisite: HIST 126 or permission of the instructor.

428G Nineteenth-Century Europe. (3) A study of Europe from 1815 to 1914. Prerequisite: HIST 126 or permission of the instructor.

429G Europe, 1914–1968. (3) A study of Europe from 1914 to 1968. Prerequisite: HIST 126 or permission of the instructor.

430G Topics in Ancient History. (3) Study of a theme or chronological period in Greek or Roman History. Topics will vary. Repeatable to six hours with permission of Departmental Graduate Committee. Prerequisite: HIST 125 or permission of the instructor.  

431G Alexander the Great. (3) The course examines the context of the life and achievement of Alexander III with particular focus on the impact outside Europe. Few individuals has as much of an impact on their contemporary and later world as Alexander III of Macedon. Prerequisite: HIST 320 or permission of instructor.

433G Tudor/Stuart England: 1485-1714. (3) Political, economic, cultural, and social history of early modern England during the reigns of the Tudor and Stuart monarchs, emphasizing social structures, cultural movements, religious continuity and change, and constitutional developments. Prerequisites: HIST 125, 325 or 333; or permission of the instructor.

434G Topics in British History. (3, repeatable to 6) Selected topics dealing with the political, social, and economic development of Britain. Topics will vary. Prerequisite: HIST 125, 126, 333, or 334 as appropriate, or permission of the instructor.

438G Germany, 1918-1949: From Defeat to Division. (3) Study of Germany from the end of World War I to its division following World War II, focusing on the Weimar Republic, rise and fall of Adolph Hitler and the Nazi Party, the Holocaust, and Germany’s postwar breakup. Prerequisite: HIST 126 or 338, or permission of the instructor.

440G Topics in Latin American History. (3, repeatable to 6) Selected topics in the social, political, economic, or intellectual history of Latin America. Topics will vary. Prerequisite: HIST 105, 106, 126, 340, or 341 as appropriate; or permission of the instructor.

444G Topics in Middle Eastern History. (3, repeatable to 6, with permission of department chairperson) Selected topics in the political, social, economic, and intellectual history of the Middle East.  Topics may vary.  Prerequisite: HIST 144 or 344, or permission of the instructor.

445G Modern East Asia. (3) A study of China, Japan, and Korea in the 20th century. Prerequisite: HIST 145, 345, or 346, or permission of the instructor.

482G Topics in European History. (3, repeatable to 6, with permission) In-depth study of a theme or chronological period in European History. Topics will vary. Prerequisite: HIST 125 or 126, or permission of the instructor.

485G Topics in Asian History. (3, repeatable to 6, with permission) In-depth study of a theme or chronological period in Asian History. Topics will vary. Prerequisites: HIST 145, 345, 346, or 445; or permission of the instructor.

488G Topics in U.S. History. (3, repeatable to 6, with permission) In-depth study of a theme or chronological period in U.S. history from the colonial period to the present. Prerequisite: HIST 105 or 106, as appropriate, or permission of the instructor.

494G Internship. (1–12, repeatable) Supervised experience of work in archives, historical institutions, or other institutions requiring historical experience. May be repeated, but only three semester hours of credit will be applied to the minimum program requirement of 31 hours.

500 Introduction to Historical Methods. (1) Introduction to resources and methods of historical research and writing.

510 Research Seminar in U.S. History. (3, repeatable) A research-centered investigation of selected topics in American history, with special attention to application of methods of research, critical analysis, and writing. May be repeated with a change in topic. Corequisite/Prerequisite: HIST 500 or permission of the instructor.

511 Readings Seminar in U.S. History. (3, repeatable) A readings-centered investigation of selected topics in American history, with attention to historiographic issues. May be repeated with a change in topic.

512 Research Seminar in Diplomatic History. (3) A research-centered investigation of selected topics in diplomatic history, with special attention to application of methods of research, critical analysis, and writing. May be repeated with a change in topic.

513 Readings Seminar in Diplomatic History. (3, repeatable) A readings-centered investigation of selected topics in diplomatic history, with attention to historiographic issues. May be repeatable with a change in topic.

515 Readings Seminar in Military History. (3, repeatable) A readings-centered investigation of selected topics in military history, with attention to historiographic issues. May be repeated with a change in topic.

530 Research Seminar in World History. (3, repeatable) A research-centered investigation of selected topics in world history, with special attention to application of methods of research, critical analysis, and writing. May be repeated with a change in topic. Corequisite/Prerequisite: HIST 500 or permission of the instructor.

531 Readings Seminar in World History. (3, repeatable) A readings-centered investigation of selected topics in world history, with attention to historiographic issues. May be repeated with a change in topic.

540 Research Seminar in European History. (3, repeatable) A research-centered investigation of selected topics in European history, with special attention to application of methods of research, critical analysis, and writing. May be repeated with a change in topic. Corequisite/Prerequisite: HIST 500 or permission of the instructor.

541 Readings Seminar in European History. (3, repeatable) A readings-centered investigation of selected topics in European history, with attention to historiographic issues. May be repeated with a change in topic.

550 Workshop. (1–3, repeatable) Offered irregularly on specific topics. May be repeated with a change in topic.

598 Readings in History. (1–6, repeatable) Individual reading. May be repeated, but a maximum of six hours will be counted toward degree requirements. Prerequisites: Six semester hours in history.

599 Special Problems in History. (1–6, repeatable) Intensive research into areas of history not specifically covered in other courses. Credit will depend on the nature of the historical problem to be examined and the length of time required to complete the project. May be repeated, although no more than six hours may count toward a degree. Prerequisites: Six semester hours in history and approval by the Departmental Graduate Committee.

600 Thesis Research. (1–6, repeatable) May be repeated, but only three semester hours will count toward degree requirements. Prerequisites: HIST 500 or 501, and approval of the thesis prospectus.

601 Thesis in History. (3) Prerequisite: HIST 600.

699 Non-thesis Oral Exam. (0) Students in degree program II or III will defend coursework and/or project in an oral exam before a committee of three faculty members selected by the student and approved by the chair of the Departmental Graduate Committee. Graded S/U. Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair.