University Art Gallery

Exhibitions - Spring 2017


Jones

Fred Jones — Ways of Seeing Landscapes
January 17 - February 16, 2017
Galleries A, B, & C
Reception(s): TBA
Artist Website: www.fredjonesviewsofnature.com

"For me, it began fifty years ago in a small Welsh village. Little did I know that I was experiencing a relationship to nature that was to become a spiritual journey. We played in the rivers, streams, forests, meadows and on hills and mountains. The flora and fauna were diverse and varied. They became part of our every day vocabulary.  

"The landscape world was made even more accessible with the poems of Wordsworth and the paintings of Constable and Turner. They described a deeper, more diverse experience and defined a way of life.  

"The works in the exhibition are an entrance to the real world of landscape. Take a walk in the woods on an autumn day or a spring rain shower or a snow covered prairie at sundown. Art can only imitate nature."



Movigliano

George and Renée Mavigliano - Celebrating a Shared Life in Art
February 21 - March 9, 2017
Galleries A & B
Reception(s): Thursday, March 9, 4:30-6:00 p.m.

George and Renee Mavigliano met at Western Illinois University in the fall of 1962.  George had left the architecture program at the University of Illinois to work in the Store Planning unit of Montgomery Wards in 1961 only to decide to return to school and complete his undergraduate degree.  Just graduated from Downers Grove High School, Renee chose to attend Western Illinois University for its small school charm.  

They met at a university lecture and have been inseparable ever since.  George completed his graduate work at Northern Illinois University in Art History, and Renee finished her undergraduate degree in Art Education.  Marriage followed in August 1966 and the young couple went to live in Chicago.  Renee taught art at Morton West High School and George taught in the Humanities Department of Wright Community College.     

A call from an old graduate school friend brought them to Southern Illinois University in the fall of 1970.  George retired from the Dean's' office in the College of Communications and Fine Arts in 1997.  Renee completed her MFA degree in 1985 while raising three children and went on to teach at John A. Logan College.  She retired in 2008.  They now live in Carterville where they operate a bookstore and gallery.  Renee continues to paint and George continues to make case bound books.



Craig

Morgan Craig — Razing the New Deal: An Exploration in Architecture and Identity
February 27 - April 7, 2017
Gallery C
Reception: Thursday, March 2, 4:30 - 6:00p.m.
Artist Website: www.morgancraig.org

"I believe that architectural structures acting as both repositories and as vehicles for memory profoundly influence culture and identity by providing a tangible framework through which facets of a society can be expressed. Consequently, I have been inspired to build a body of work dealing with how identity is influenced by the types of architectural edifices present in a given landscape. So often the post-industrial edifices are dismissed as symbols of failure, danger, and/or obsolescence. While evidence of these pasts or present-day difficulties may not be pleasant, I feel it imperative that societies not ignore their existence and their impact on the past, present, and future understanding of societies.

"In many instances, these factories, asylums, and penitentiaries have defined a city or town if not engulfed it, turning some of these towns into nothing more than apparitions of a forgotten glory. Do we view our past as being besmirched by said factories? What is it that repels the viewer and yet draws him or her in? Why do we claim to restore a building, only to bastardize it? What can ruins tell us about broader social and cultural processes within the urban milieu? What is this need we have to possess what is merely fiction created by one's own wild imagination?

My work is not merely a method of documentation, but a sociopolitical commentary on the effects of hubris, avarice, deregulated capitalism, free trade and technological obsolescence upon communities throughout the world."



Reedy

Michael Reedy — time and folly
March 20 - April 21, 2017
Gallery A & B
Reception: Thursday, March 23, 4:30-6:00 p.m.
Artist Website: www.mikereedy.com

"The human figure has been central to my studies and explorations as a practicing artist for the last twenty years. My ongoing curiosity regarding the physical limits of the body, and its ultimate failing (both outwardly and inwardly), has been paired with prior interests long rooted in depictions of the body that fall outside the canon of art history (medical imaging and cartooning). Here, the ongoing references to anatomical illustration, and its benign approach to depicting pain and death, and cartooning serve to both underscore the comedic tragedy of physical existence, as well as the frailties that increasingly define our sense of self as we age. In each instance, the unsettling presence of the open body (removed from its traditional context) presents complex questions of gender, pleasure, pain, interpretation, and reception, and results in works infused with a sense of scientific aura, moral lesson, and morbid entertainment. Consequently, I hope the viewer is seduced into disregarding the boundaries between interior and exterior, between looking and feeling, and between the real and the pictured body."


Annual Juried Student Exhibition
April 17 - May 5, 2017
Gallery C
Reception: Thursday, April 20, 4:30-6:00 p.m.


BFA solo exhibition(s) TBA
April 25 - May 12, 2017
Gallery C
Reception(s): TBA


Just in case you want to see 2015-16 Exhibitions.