Undergraduate Catalog

Dietetics, Fashion Merchandising and Hospitality

Chairperson: Dr. Mary W. Mhango
Office: Knoblauch Hall 140
Telephone: (309) 298-1085; Fax: (309) 298-2688
E-mail: M-Mhango@wiu.edu
Website: wiu.edu/dfmh

Program Offerings and Locations:

  • Bachelor of Science in Apparel and Textile Merchandising: Macomb
  • Bachelor of Science in Dietetics: Macomb
  • Bachelor of Science in Hospitality Management: Macomb
  • Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Foodservice Management: Macomb
  • Minor in Apparel and Textile Merchandising: Macomb
  • Minor in Event Planning and Management: Macomb, Quad Cities
  • Minor in Hospitality Management: Macomb
  • Minor in Nutrition: Macomb

Faculty: Boston, Cassady, Creasey, Greathouse, Gurzell, Kanauss, Kaul, Keist, Koo, Longley, Shupe.

The Department of Dietetics, Fashion Merchandising and Hospitality offers four Bachelor of Science degree programs: Dietetics, Apparel and Textile Merchandising, Hospitality Management, and Nutrition and Foodservice Management. The department prepares its graduates for a wide range of careers, including management positions for corporations, hospitals, retail businesses, hotels, restaurants, and government agencies, as well as graduate study.

The Bachelor of Science in Dietetics provides quality education that prepares students with the technical, human, and conceptual skills for entry level positions in a variety of food and nutrition settings. The Dietetics program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND), located at the headquarters of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics at 120 Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606; telephone (800) 877-1600. Graduation is based on completion of requirements of the accredited Dietetics major requirements and fulfillment of University requirements.

Admission to the B.S. in Dietetics:
  1. Students wishing to pursue a Bachelor of Science in Dietetics will enter into the program as Pre-Dietetics majors. Pre-Dietetics majors at Western Illinois University will become Dietetics majors after completion of 60 semester hours (s.h.) with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00.
  2. Transfer students who have earned 60 s.h. prior to matriculation at WIU and have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00 will enter as fully declared majors.
  3. After acceptance into the Bachelor of Science in Dietetics, each student must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or higher on a 4.00 scale to be retained in the program. Students with less than a 3.00 GPA after admission into the Dietetics major will be dismissed from the Dietetics program but will be encouraged to stay within the Department of Dietetics, Fashion Merchandising, and Hospitality and may elect to become Nutrition and Foodservice Management majors.
  4. Pre-Dietetics majors who have earned 60 s.h. but are otherwise ineligible to declare a Dietetics major will be encouraged to stay within the Department of Dietetics, Fashion Merchandising, and Hospitality and may elect to become Nutrition and Foodservice Management majors.

The Bachelor of Science in Apparel and Textile Merchandising prepares students with the skills and knowledge for a broad range of careers in the fashion industry. The curriculum is designed to give students opportunities to apply retail, basic design, and computer skills to marketing and management functions in retail organizations, display/visual departments, or mall corporate offices. Field trips, guest speakers, fashion productions, travel studies, and Study Abroad programs enhance the comprehensive curriculum and contribute to a strong foundation in retail customer service in a variety of positions. Opportunities to participate in study tours (domestic and abroad), professional career days, advisory council seminars, regional student organizations, and/or completing an internship abroad exist for all students.

The Bachelor of Science in Hospitality Management helps students develop foundational knowledge and skills appropriate for the hospitality industry. Students are provided numerous opportunities to focus on contemporary issues affecting the hospitality industry from strategic management and marketing perspectives. The curriculum allows students to develop leadership skills, problem solving abilities and critical thinking skills, and to engage in day-to-day activities associated with management of a hospitality entity. Opportunities to participate in domestic and international study tours, advisory council seminars and local, state, and national professional meetings and to complete an internship program exist for all students.

The Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Foodservice Management prepares students with the competencies, knowledge, and skills required of the nutrition and foodservice professional for practical roles in nutrition services and the foodservice industry. Career opportunities exist in hospitals, long-term care, schools, correctional facilities, senior living facilities, and other commercial and noncommercial foodservice industries. Students acquire knowledge of skills in areas such as the science of food and human nutrition, the principles and practices of food production, foodservice operation systems, safety and sanitation, and the philosophies of environmental design and healthy nutrition conduct. Opportunities to participate in professional meetings, advisory council seminars, field trips, travel tours, Study Abroad programs, and to complete an internship program exist for all students.

Honors Curriculum—Academically qualified students in this department are encouraged to complete an honors curriculum in University Honors, Departmental Honors, or General Honors. All Honors students must complete the one-hour honors colloquium (G H 299). General Honors includes General Honors coursework. Departmental Honors includes honors work in the major. University Honors combines Departmental and General Honors. For more information about honors curricula see the Centennial Honors College page of the catalog or visit the Centennial Honors College website at wiu.edu/Honors.

Degree Programs

Bachelor of Science in Dietetics

All students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Dietetics must complete I, II, and III below, and the foreign language/global issues requirement for the major#. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 123 s.h.

  1. University General Education Curriculum: 43 s.h.
  2. Core Courses: 61 s.h.
    1. HM 151, 250, 251, 253: 7 s.h.
    2. NUTR 109**, 152, 153, 190, 209, 300**, 301, 303, 304, 305, 306, 307, 308, 400, 404, 405, 406, 407, 408†, 409, 438, 467: 54 s.h.
  3. Other: 41 s.h.
    1. BIOL 100** OR 101**: 4 s.h.
    2. CHEM 101**, 102**, 221**#: 12 s.h.
    3. ECON 231**: 3 s.h.
    4. HRM 353: 3 s.h.
    5. KIN 290, 291: 6 s.h.
    6. MGT 349: 3 s.h.
    7. MICR 200: 4 s.h.
    8. PSY 100**: 3 s.h.
    9. STAT 171** or equivalent: 3 s.h.
    10. FR/GER/SPAN 224** (recommended)

*Students with a career objective of becoming a registered dietitian must complete a program of study which meets the accredited Didactic Program in Dietetics at WIU. (These program competencies must be met prior to the application to an accredited dietetic internship.)

**May count toward the University General Education Curriculum requirement.

**#Does not count toward the University General Education Curriculum requirement.

#The foreign language/global issues graduation requirement may be fulfilled by successfully completing one of the following: 1) an intermediate foreign language requirement; 2) a General Education global issues course; or 3) NUTR 300.

†NUTR 408 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) graduation requirement.

Bachelor of Science in Apparel and Textile Merchandising

All students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Apparel and Textile Merchandising must complete I, II, III, IV, and V below, and the foreign language/global issues requirement for the major#. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 120 s.h.

  1. University General Education Curriculum: 43 s.h.
  2. Core Courses: 32 s.h.
    ATM 170, 190, 270, 276, 331, 375*, 376†, 470, 476, 478, 479
  3. Directed Electives: 27 s.h.
    1. Choose 18 s.h. from one of the following emphases: 18 s.h.
      1. Apparel Product Development
        ATM 171, 272, 370, 371, 480; MKTG 327
      2. Merchandising Strategies
        ATM 272, 278, 372, 373, 472, 480
      3. Apparel and Textile Management
        ATM 274, 278, 374, 473, 474; MKTG 327
    2. Choose 9 s.h. from the following courses (other than those required in emphasis chosen above): 9 s.h.
      ATM 171, 272, 274, 278, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 377, 378, 472, 473, 474, 477, 480
  4. Open Electives: 9 s.h.
  5. Other: 9 s.h.
    1. HRM 353: 3 s.h.
    2. MGT 349: 3 s.h.
    3. STAT 171*: 3 s.h.

*May count toward the University General Education Curriculum requirement.

#The foreign language/global issues graduation requirement may be fulfilled by successfully completing one of the following: 1) an intermediate foreign language requirement; 2) a General Education global issues course; or 3) ATM 375.

†ATM 376 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) graduation requirement.

Bachelor of Science in Hospitality Management

All students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Hospitality Management must complete I, II, III, IV, and V below, and the foreign language/global issues requirement for the major#. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 120 s.h.

  1. University General Education Curriculum: 43 s.h.
  2. Core Courses: 54 s.h.
    1. HM 150, 151, 159, 190, 250, 251, 253, 254, 255, 353, 354, 357, 359, 451, 453†, 454, 458, 459: 45 s.h.
    2. NUTR 109, 152, 153, 300: 9 s.h.
  3. Directed Electives: 6 s.h.
    Select 6 s.h. from the following courses: HM 256, 257, 356, 358, 452, 455, 456, 477
  4. Open Electives: 5 s.h.
  5. Other: 12 s.h.
    1. HRM 353: 3 s.h.
    2. MGT 349: 3 s.h.
    3. RPTA 110*: 3 s.h.
    4. STAT 171*: 3 s.h.

*May count toward the University General Education Curriculum requirement.

#The foreign language/global issues graduation requirement may be fulfilled by successfully completing one of the following: 1) an intermediate foreign language requirement; 2) a General Education global issues course; or 3) NUTR 300.

†HM 453 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) graduation requirement.

Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Foodservice Management

All students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Foodservice Management must complete I, II, III, and IV below, and the foreign language/global issues requirement for the major#. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 120 s.h.

  1. University General Education Curriculum: 43 s.h.
  2. Core Courses: 66 s.h.
    1. HM 151, 250, 251, 253, 254, 353, 354, 356, 359, 451, 458: 25 s.h.
    2. NUTR 109**, 152, 153, 190, 206, 209, 300**, 303, 305, 307, 308, 404, 408†, 440: 41 s.h.
  3. Directed Electives: 7 s.h.
    Select 7 s.h. from the following courses: HM 256, 358, 452; NUTR 301, 306, 379, 400, 405, 450 (Healthy Cooking), 450 (Weight Management), 467
  4. Other: 23 s.h.
    1. BIOL 101**: 4 s.h.
    2. ECON 231**: 3 s.h.
    3. HRM 353: 3 s.h.
    4. MGT 349: 3 s.h.
    5. MICR 200: 4 s.h.
    6. PSY 100**: 3 s.h.
    7. STAT 171**: 3 s.h.

**May count toward the University General Education Curriculum requirement.

#The foreign language/global issues graduation requirement may be fulfilled by successfully completing NUTR 300.

†NUTR 408 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) graduation requirement.

Minors

Minor in Event Planning and Management

See Interdisciplinary Studies Minors.

Minor in Apparel and Textile Merchandising: 18 s.h.
  1. ATM 170, 270: 6 s.h.
  2. Directed Electives
    1. ATM 375, 376, or 476: 3 s.h.
    2. Select 9 s.h. from the following courses: 9 s.h.
      ATM 171, 272, 274, 276, 278, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 378, 470, 472, 473, 474, 480
Minor in Hospitality Management: 16–18 s.h.
  1. Select 10–12 s.h. from the following courses: 10–12 s.h.
    HM 150, 151, 159*, 253, 254, 255, 256, 257, 359
  2. Select 6 s.h. from the following courses: 6 s.h.
    NUTR 300; HM 354, 358**, 452, 455, 456

*Required of students who do not have adequate work experience in the hospitality industry. Student should complete this course early in their program.

**No more than 3 s.h. of HM 358 may count toward the Hospitality Management minor.

Minor in Nutrition: 18 s.h.
  1. NUTR 109, 209, 305, 404: 12 s.h.
  2. Select 6 s.h. from the following courses: 6 s.h.
    NUTR 300, 303, 306, 308, 379, 400, 405, 408, 450 (Sports Nutrition), 450 (Weight Management), 450 (Healthy Cooking)

Course Descriptions

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES (FCS)

121 Introduction to Life Span Development. (3) (General Education/Human Well-Being) Growth and development of the individual throughout the life span and family life cycle within the context of the family and community.

321 Preparation for Marriage and Family. (3) Study of factors associated with marital happiness and success including mate selection, changing roles in marriage through the life cycle, and adjustment to conflicts.

APPAREL AND TEXTILE MERCHANDISING (ATM)

170 (Formerly FCS 170) Introduction to Apparel Merchandising. (3) Introduction to the merchandising of fashion through the study of fashion vocabulary, the fashion process, fashion publications, and career opportunities.

171 (Formerly FCS 171) Basic Clothing Construction Techniques. (3) A broad range of sewing techniques and problems applied to a variety of projects for the individual. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab. (Additional lab supplies to be purchased.)

190 (Formerly FCS 190) (Cross-listed with HM 190 and NUTR 190) Introduction to Professional Practices. (1) This course is designed to introduce DFMH majors to program expectations specific to their careers. Students will be exposed to a variety of resources to aid them in their studies. Not open to students with credit in HM 190 or NUTR 190.

270 (Formerly FCS 270) Textile Science. (3) Introduction to textile fibers, yarns, structures, and finishes related to performance, selection, and care of textile products. Prerequisite: ATM 170.

272 (Formerly FCS 272) Basic Design Concepts for Merchandising. (3) Explore the visual aspect of fashion products using principles and elements of design. Prerequisite: ATM 170. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab. (Additional lab supplies to be purchased.)

274 (Formerly FCS 274) Apparel Merchandising Systems. (3) Provides an overview of basic math functions used in the fashion merchandising industry. Prerequisite: ATM 170.

276 Apparel Forecasting. (3) Introduction to methods and analysis techniques used by forecasters to predict future trends in the fashion industry including styles, fabrics, and colors. Prerequisites: ATM 170 and STAT 171.

278 (Formerly FCS 278) Merchandising Practicum. (3) Expose students to the fashion related retail environment. Prerequisite: ATM 170. 3 hrs. lect.; 4 hrs. lab.

331 (Formerly FCS 331) Consumer and Professional Practice. (3) Interrelationship of environments and the consumer, in addition to integrating professional practices in the apparel industry. Study of consumer services, consumer wants, professional behavior, and cultural diversity in the workplace. Prerequisites: ATM 170 and junior standing.

370 (Formerly FCS 370) Quality Assurance in the Apparel Industry. (3) A pragmatic application of evaluating performance characteristics of textiles, textile testing techniques, and the significance of quality in textile products. Prerequisite: ATM 270. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

371 Apparel Product Analysis. (3) Study of manufacturing processes and practices used by fashion industries focused on ready-to-wear apparel production including written specifications, sizing, labeling, styling details, garment assembly, and cost. Prerequisite: ATM 270.

372 (Formerly FCS 372) Visual Merchandising. (3) Practical application of visual merchandising practices and techniques as related to fashion retail organizations, interiors, and their merchandise. Prerequisite: ATM 272. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab. Additional lab supplies to be purchased.

373 (Formerly FCS 373) Fashion Promotion. (3) A practical approach to promotion techniques in the fashion industry. Prerequisites: ATM 372 and junior standing.

374 (Formerly FCS 374) Buying. (3) A study of fashion retail buying, practices, and procedures. Computer technology will be a part of this course. Prerequisite: ATM 274. Field trips and production work are required.

375 (Formerly FCS 375) Diversity of Dress. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) (Global Issues) An exploration of diverse cultures through dress and adornment. Prerequisites: At least one course in each of Category III and Category IV of the University General Education Curriculum or permission of instructor.

376 (Formerly FCS 277 and FCS 376) Historical Costume—Twentieth Century. (3) A theoretical approach to twentieth century historic dress examined in the context of social, economical, political, and artistic development. Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course. Prerequisites: ATM 170; ENG 180 and 280.

377 (Formerly FCS 377) Apparel Merchandising Travel Study. (3) Tours to domestic and international properties, facilities, and agencies related to the fashion industry. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor.

378 (Formerly FCS 378) Seminar in Apparel Merchandising. (3) An analysis of current issues, trends, and future projections influencing the field of apparel and textile merchandising. Prerequisites: ATM 170 and permission of instructor.

470 Apparel Brand Management. (3) Overview of essential elements of fashion brands and the fashion branding process within the apparel and textile industry. Explore concepts, strategies, and issues involved in fashion branding and merchandising activities with respect to the stylistic aspects of the apparel industry. Prerequisites: ATM 170; junior standing or permission of instructor.

472 (Formerly FCS 472) Merchandising Strategies. (3) Visual merchandising practices and techniques applied to merchandise, store design, and store layout using industry software. Prerequisites: ATM 372 and junior standing.

473 (Formerly FCS 473) Apparel Merchandising Entrepreneurship. (3) A practical approach to researching and developing a fashion retail business plan. Prerequisites: ATM 274 and junior standing.

474 (Formerly FCS 474) Apparel Multi-Channel Retailing. (3) An overview and analysis of multichanneling as a retail model and its impact on the fashion industry. Prerequisites: ATM 374 and junior standing.

476 (Formerly FCS 476) Global Issues Affecting Apparel Merchandising. (3) A critical analysis of merchandising principles and practices as applied to the textile and apparel complex in a global context with emphasis on economic, political, environmental, cultural, and societal issues; geographic distribution, trade theory; trade data; and technological developments. Prerequisites: ATM 170, and junior standing or permission of instructor.

477 (Formerly FCS 477) (Cross-listed with HM 477) Theory and Research in Apparel Merchandising and Hospitality Management. (3) A study of theory, research methods, and analytical concepts in apparel and textile merchandising, hospitality management, and nutrition. Not open to students with credit in HM 477. Prerequisites: STAT 171 and junior standing.

478 (Formerly FCS 478) Apparel Merchandising Pre-Internship. (1) Preparation for the internship including resume writing, investigation of site opportunities, interviewing, and overview of the internship program. To be taken the semester before the internship. Prerequisites: ATM 170, 270, 276, and 331.

479 (Formerly FCS 479) Internship in Apparel Merchandising. (6) Supervised field experience for application of theory and skills in an agency or business approved by the department. 40 clock hours per semester hour are required. Prerequisites: ATM 478, 2.5 GPA in the major and 2.0 GPA overall, and site approved by the department. Graded S/U only.

480 Apparel Styling. (3) This course focuses on adapting fashion appearance to create the image working with clientele. It will acquaint students with the principles and practices of the image consulting industry. Prerequisites: ATM 170; junior standing or permission of instructor.

HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT (HM)

150 (Formerly FCS 150) Introduction to Hospitality Management. (2) A review of the history, growth, and development of hospitality services including an exploration of career opportunities in contemporary hospitality operation.

151 (Formerly FCS 151) Principles of Safety, Security and Food Sanitation in Hospitality Operations. (2) Basic principles of sanitation, safety, and security in food, beverage, and lodging operations. Recommended to be taken concurrently with NUTR 152 and 153, or permission of instructor.

159 (Formerly FCS 159) Hospitality Practicum. (1, repeatable to 3) A course designed to give students practicum experience in the hospitality industry. May be waived for students with 200 hours of documented work experience. Prerequisite: HM 150.

190 (Formerly FCS 190) (Cross-listed with ATM 190 and NUTR 190) Introduction to Professional Practices. (1) This course is designed to introduce DFMH majors to program expectations specific to their careers. Students will be exposed to a variety of resources to aid them in their studies. Not open to students with credit in ATM 190 or NUTR 190.

250 (Formerly FCS 250) Quantity Food Production and Service. (2) Planning, production, and service of foods in a commercial/institutional food service operation. Prerequisites: HM 151 with successful ServSafe certification; NUTR 152 and 153. Corequisite: HM 251.

251 (Formerly FCS 251) Quantity Food Production and Service Laboratory. (1) Practice and application of planning, procurement, production, and service of foods in a commercial/institutional food service operation. Corequisite: HM 250.

253 (Formerly FCS 253) Systems Procurement. (2) Food markets, regulations, purchasing, procedures, specifications, and standards for procurement of food and equipment. Prerequisites: NUTR 152 and 153.

254 (Formerly FCS 254) Hospitality Facilities Management. (3) Introduction to building systems and facilities for hospitality operations. Prerequisite: HM 150.

255 (Formerly FCS 255) Front Office Management. (3) A study of the flow of activities and functions in today’s lodging operations. Topics include comparison of manual, machine-assisted, and computer-based methods for each front desk function. Prerequisite: HM 150. Activities outside of class and field trips are required.

256 (Formerly FCS 256) Bar and Beverage Management. (3) Principles of beverage science, mixology; bar and beverage management including controlling personnel, purchasing, inventory, and equipment; and legal issues related to clientele. Prerequisites: HM 150 and 21 years of age. Field trips will be required.

257 (Formerly FCS 257) Introduction to Club Management. (3) This course introduces students to the role of the food service manager in private clubs. The information presented includes the role of the food service manager in dealing with boards of directors and private club operations. Prerequisite: HM 150.

350 (Formerly FCS 350) Wedding Planning. (3) This course focuses on the wedding planning process and examines the role of the wedding planner in creating the couple’s timeline and budget, selection of wedding apparel, venue, photography, and music, while honoring features of traditional and non-traditional weddings. Prerequisites: FCS 150, RPTA 110, RPTA 111, or permission of the instructor.

353 (Formerly FCS 353) Hospitality Financial Systems. (3) Introduction to the principles and procedures employed in the Uniform System of Accounts for the Lodging Industry (USALI). Prerequisites: HM 250, 251, 255.

354 (Formerly FCS 354) Hospitality Promotions. (3) Study of marketing concepts, methods, and techniques used in the hospitality industry with emphasis on event promotion, customer retention, research, and data analysis. Prerequisite: HM 255.

356 (Formerly FCS 356) Catering. (2) Principles of catering management including staffing, recipe and menu development, procurement, production, presentation and service, and cost analysis. Prerequisites: HM 250 and 251. 1 hr. lect.; 3 hrs. lab.

357 (Formerly FCS 357) Professional Experience in Food Service/Lodging Operations. (3) Experience in day-to-day operation and management of a foodservice or lodging operation department, including experience in supervision, financial management, and evaluation. Prerequisites: HM 250 and 251.

358 (Formerly FCS 358) Hospitality Management Travel Studies. (1–6, repeatable to 6) Studies of domestic and international properties, facilities, and agencies which are related to the hospitality industry. Prerequisites: HM 250, 254, 255, and junior standing.

359 (Formerly FCS 258 and FCS 359) Legal Aspects in Hospitality Management. (3) Survey of laws applied to hospitality establishments with emphasis on managerial approach to solving or avoiding potential tort and contractual violations while managing hospitality establishment. Prerequisites: HM 250 and 254.

451 (Formerly FCS 451) Food Service Systems Management. (3) An exploration of theories, principles, and functions of management as they apply to food service operations. Emphasis placed on qualitative and quantitative evaluations of food service operations. Prerequisites: HM 353, MGT 349, and senior standing.

452 (Formerly FCS 452) Wines of the World. (2) In-depth study of wine producing areas of the world and foods that are specifically paired with those vintages. The course includes international to local vineyards and their unique wine products. Industry accepted tasting method presented. Prerequisites: HM 150 or permission of department advisor, and 21 years of age.

453 (Formerly FCS 453) Lodging Systems Management. (3) An exploration of theories, principles, and functions of management as they apply to lodging service operations. Emphasis on strategic planning and strategic management of lodging systems operations. Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course. Prerequisites: HM 353, ENG 180 and 280, and MGT 349.

454 (Formerly FCS 454) Seminar in Hospitality Management. (3, repeatable to 6 on different topics and issues) Review and discussion of technological, operational, and human advancement in hospitality services. Emphasis on communications, human resource development, research, and quality control in the hospitality industry. Prerequisite: HM 451 or 453.

455 (Formerly FCS 455) (Cross-listed with RPTA 455) Casino Operations. (3) Description of basic casino operations and principles of casino marketing, mathematics of casino games, and utility analysis of gaming motivation and gaming addictions. Exploration of career opportunities in the gaming industry. Historical background and impact of gaming on hospitality industry. Not open to students with credit in RPTA 455. Prerequisites: HM 150; HM 353 or RPTA 322 or RPTA 323.

456 (Formerly FCS 456) Independent Study in Hospitality Management. (1–3) This course is available to students interested in topics not currently part of the curriculum. Students should consult the advisor or department chair about interest(s). Prerequisites: senior standing and permission of the instructor and department chair.

458 (Formerly FCS 458) Pre-Internship in Hospitality Management. (1) Development of personal professional documents and portfolio. Investigating possible internships and securing an internship. To be taken the semester before the internship. Prerequisites: HM 250, 251, 254, 255, and junior standing.

459 (Formerly FCS 459) Hospitality Management Internship. (6) Supervised field experience for application of theory and skills in an agency or property approved by the department. Sixty-five clock hours per semester hour are required. Prerequisites: HM 458; senior standing; GPA of 2.5 in four of the five specific courses: HM 353, 354, 451, 453, or 454; site approved by the department; approval of internship coordinator or department chair. Graded S/U only.

477 (Formerly FCS 477) (Cross-listed with ATM 477) Theory and Research in Apparel Merchandising and Hospitality Management. (3) A study of theory, research methods, and analytical concepts in apparel and textile merchandising, hospitality management, and nutrition. Not open to students with credit in ATM 477. Prerequisites: STAT 171 and junior standing.

NUTRITION (NUTR)

109 (Formerly FCS 109) Introduction to Nutrition. (3) (General Education/Human Well-Being) Basic principles of human nutrition related to maintenance of optimum nutritional status.

152 (Formerly FCS 152) Principles of Food Preparation. (2) Study of the principles of food selection, basic preparation techniques and methods, evaluation, and safety. Prerequisite or Corequisite: HM 151. Corequisite: NUTR 153.

153 (Formerly FCS 153) Principles of Food Preparation Lab. (1) Practice and application of selected principles of food selection, basic preparation techniques and methods, evaluation, and safety of food products. Prerequisite or Corequisite: HM 151. Corequisite: NUTR 152. 3 hrs. lab.

190 (Formerly FCS 190) (Cross-listed with ATM 190 and HM 190) Introduction to Professional Practices. (1) This course is designed to introduce DFMH majors to program expectations specific to their careers. Students will be exposed to a variety of resources to aid them in their studies. Not open to students with credit in ATM 190 or HM 190.

206 Nutrition and Foodservice Management Practicum. (3) A course designed to give students practicum experience in the nutrition and/or foodservice management industries. Prerequisites: HM 151; NUTR 109, 152, and 153.

209 (Formerly FCS 209) Intermediate Nutrition. (3) Presents an intermediate-level overview of the digestion and metabolism of the macronutrients. Reviews descriptive and analytic research methods and basic statistics. Prerequisite: NUTR 109.

300 (Formerly FCS 300) Food and Culture. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) (Global Issues) Overview of the socio-cultural aspects of food and habits. The study of the cultural influences on food in different global societies including nourishment, health beliefs and practices, religion, cross-cultural communication, and health status outcomes. Prerequisites: at least one course in each of Category III and Category IV of the General Education Curriculum.

301 (Formerly FCS 301) Food Science Theory and Applications. (3) Basic food science principles and applications in the field of dietetics. Prerequisites: NUTR 109, 152, and 153; CHEM 101; and junior standing; or permission of instructor. 2 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab.

303 (Formerly FCS 303) Child Nutrition. (3) Evaluation of the nutrition needs and problems of children and examination of the foodservice and nutrition components in programs designed for children. Prerequisite: NUTR 109.

304 (Formerly FCS 304) Nutrition Informatics. (2) An analysis of the scientific basis of the dietetics profession with emphasis on the use of technology for locating professional literature to make ethical evidence-based decisions for treatment. Prerequisites: NUTR 209; STAT 171 or SOC 323 or DS 203.

305 (Formerly FCS 305) Nutrition Throughout the Life Span. (3) Evaluation of nutritional needs and problems and identification of community nutrition programs for individuals at different stages of the lifespan. Prerequisite: NUTR 109. Activities outside of class may be required.

306 (Formerly FCS 306) Nutrition Science I. (3) A study of the physiological and biochemical aspects of nutrition. Prerequisites: NUTR 209; CHEM 101 and 102.

307 (Formerly FCS 307) Nutrition Field Study. (1) Field study to take students as a group outside of the Macomb area to bridge their didactic program to a range of observations included in dietetic practice. Prerequisites: junior standing or permission of the instructor. There will be a $50 fee for this class.

308 (Formerly FCS 308) Nutrition for the Older Adult. (3) Evaluate the nutrition needs and problems of older adults, and examine the foodservice and nutrition components in programs designed for older adults. Prerequisite: NUTR 109.

379 Nutrition Travel Studies. (3) Studies of international and domestic properties, facilities, and agencies related to the nutrition industry. Prerequisites: NUTR 109 and 300, and junior standing.

400 (Formerly FCS 400) Herbals. (1) This course provides a foundation of knowledge concerning common herbal supplements and their interactions with nutrients. Prerequisite: NUTR 109.

404 (Formerly FCS 404) Nutrition Assessment. (3) Methods of screening and assessment of nutritional status including clinical, biochemical, and anthropometric measurements. Prerequisite: NUTR 209.

405 (Formerly FCS 405) Nutrition Science II. (3) Biochemical and physiological basis of nutrients in metabolism and their interrelations. Research methodology used in nutrition. Prerequisite: NUTR 306.

406 (Formerly FCS 406) Medical Nutrition Therapy. (4) A study of the physiological and biochemical basis for using therapeutic diets. Prerequisite: NUTR 404. 3 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.

407 (Formerly FCS 407) Dietetics Communications and Education. (3) Dietetics communication and education theories and applications. Counseling theories and methods of changing food behavior. Prerequisites: NUTR 209 and junior standing.

408 (Formerly FCS 408) Community Nutrition. (3) Community nutrition programs in the United States. Development and evaluation of community nutrition programs. Writing Instruction in the Disciplines (WID) course. Prerequisites: NUTR 209; ENG 180 and 280. Activities outside of class are required.

409 (Formerly FCS 409) Dietetics Practicum. (1) Practicum provides students with the opportunity to experience various aspects of dietetics including clinical, foodservice management, and community nutrition in a practical setting. Prerequisites: NUTR 307 and senior standing, or permission of the instructor.

438 Dietetic Pre-Internship. (1) Researching accredited dietetic internships. Completion of DICAS application and other professional documents. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dietetics program.

440 Nutrition and Foodservice Management Internship. (9) Supervised field experience for application of theory and skills in an agency or property approved by the department. Graded S/U only. Prerequisites: senior standing; HM 458; GPA of 2.5 in four of the following courses: HM 353, HM 354, HM 451, NUTR 209, NUTR 408; site approved by department; approval of internship coordinator or department chair.

450 (Formerly FCS 450) Professional Workshops in Nutrition. (1–3) These courses are intended for majors in Nutrition and Foodservice, minors in Nutrition, and others interested in the field. They are offered in the topic areas of Healthy Cooking, Sports Nutrition, and Weight Management. Prerequisite: NUTR 109 or permission of instructor.

467 (Formerly FCS 467) Management in Dietetics. (4) Senior level dietetics/food management including financial principles, facility management, reimbursement for services, entrepreneurism, and application of marketing and information management to foodservice systems. Prerequisite: NUTR 304.