2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog

English and Journalism

Chairperson: Dr. Mark Mossman
Office: Simpkins Hall 124
Telephone: (309) 298-1103 Fax: (309) 298-2974
Website: wiu.edu/English

Faculty: Allen, Allison, Ashwood-Gegas, Baird, Balderson, Banash, Bollin, Braniff, Brigham, Buchanan, Butzow, Clemons, Cook, Courter, DiCarmine, Dilger, Hansen, Helwig, Hutinger, Iwanicki, Kernek, Knight, Knox, Livingston-Webber, Malachuk, Morrow, Mossman, O’Donnell-Brown, Otto, Parkinson, Patrick, Rahman, Rigg, Robertson, Siddiqi, Simmons, Sinex, Sonnek, Strother-Adams, Tang, Trias, Wherley, Wilson-Jordan, Wort, Wurth, Young, Zemke.

The Department of English and Journalism offers the sequence of courses in composition required of all students; literature, drama, and film courses which fulfill the humanities and multicultural studies requirements of the University General Education Curriculum; a major and minor in English; a comprehensive major in English Teacher Certification; a major and minor in Journalism; minors in Creative Writing and Professional Writing; and electives in advanced writing and creative writing. It also participates in interdisciplinary programs in Broadcast and Print Media, Environmental Studies, Film, and Women’s Studies.

Although the department’s offerings are diverse, critical writing, reading, and thinking— developed by active engagement with and participation in the related discourses of literature, film, creative and expository writing—are the constant emphases. The department prepares its graduates to perform successfully in graduate and professional schools and in the many fields in which clear thinking and effective self-expression are valued.

GradTrac is available. See more information about GradTrac.

Honors Curriculum—Academically qualified students in this department are welcome to complete an honors curriculum in University Honors, Upper Division Honors, or Lower Division Honors. All Honors students must complete the one-hour honors colloquium (G H 299). Lower Division Honors includes General Honors coursework. Upper Division Honors includes honors work in the major. University Honors combines Upper and Lower Division Honors. For more information about honors curricula see the Centennial Honors College page of the catalog or visit the Centennial Honors College website at www.wiu.edu/Honors.

Degree Programs

Bachelor of Arts—English

All students seeking the Bachelor of Arts in English must complete I, II, and III.A. or III.B. below, and the foreign language/global issues requirement for the major#. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 120 s.h.

In accordance with the Illinois State Board of Education certification rules, all candidates seeking teacher certification are required by Western Illinois University to obtain a grade of “C” or better in all directed general education courses, all core courses, and all courses in the option. Note C- is below a C.

  1. University General Education and College of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Requirements: 60 s.h.
    Except teacher certification students must complete the University General Education Curriculum Requirements, including a General Education mathematics course—43 s.h.
  2. Core Courses: 15 s.h.
    ENG 200, 299, 476†; Choose two of the following: ENG 201, 202, 290, 291
  3. Option of Study (select A or B)
    1. Literature and Language
      1. Special Courses
        1. One upper-division course in Forms, chosen from among the following: ENG 302, 304, 305, 306, 310, 393, 395; or ENG 400, 409 when appropriate: 3 s.h.
        2. One upper-division course in Traditions, chosen from among the following: ENG 311, 312, 314, 319, 324, 331, 334, 335, 337, 340, 347, 353, 355, 390; or ENG 400, 401, 409 when appropriate: 3 s.h.
        3. One upper-division course in Social Justice, chosen from among the following: ENG 307, 346, 348, 350, 351, 357, 358, 392; or ENG 400, 401, 409 when appropriate: 3 s.h.
        4. One upper-division course in Theory/Language, chosen from among the following: ENG 368, 370, 372, 389, 473, 474: 3 s.h.
        5. ENG 376: 1 s.h.
      2. Departmental Electives (6 s.h. must be upper-division): 12 s.h.
      3. Any Minor: 18 s.h.
      4. Open Electives: 2 s.h.
    2. English-Teacher Certification
      1. Special Courses
        1. Choose one of the following:
          ENG 202, 290: 3 s.h.
        2. One upper-division course in Traditions, chosen from among: ENG 311, 312, 314, 319, 324, 331, 334, 335, 337, 340, 347, 353, 355, 390; or ENG 400, 401, 409 when appropriate: 3 s.h.
        3. One upper-division course in Social Justice, chosen from among the following: ENG 346, 348, 350, 358, 392; or ENG 400, 401, 409 when appropriate: 3 s.h.
        4. ENG 372, 384†, 466, 471, 499: 15 s.h.
      2. Select Minor or Emphasis in Speech or Journalism (choose a, b, or c)
        1. Any Minor: 18 s.h.
        2. Emphasis in Speech
          COMM 241: 3 s.h.
          Two of the following: COMM 170, 341, or 344: 6 s.h.
        3. Emphasis in Journalism: 9 s.h.
          JOUR 231, 232, 328
      3. (Left Blank)
      4. Other
        1. ENG 433: 3 s.h.
        2. RDG 468: 3 s.h.
        3. Professional Education Sequence: 13 s.h.
          EIS 201, 301, 302, 303 (1 s.h.), 304 (1 s.h.), 401
        4. SPED 310 and SPED 390 or PSY 425 and SPED 390: 4 s.h.
        5. Educ 439: 3 s.h.
        6. STCH 480: 12 s.h.

#The foreign language/global issues graduation requirement may be fulfilled by successfully completing one of the following: 1) an intermediate foreign language requirement; 2) a General Education global issues course; 3) an English (ENG) global issues course; or 4) an approved study abroad program.

†ENG 476 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) graduation requirement for the Literature and Language option. ENG 384 and 476 fulfill the WID graduation requirement for the Teacher Certification option.

Bachelor of Arts—Journalism

All students seeking the Bachelor of Arts in Journalism must complete I, II, and III below, and the foreign language/global issues requirement for the major#. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 120 s.h.

  1. University General Education and College of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Requirements: 60 s.h.
  2. Core Courses: 15 s.h.
    JOUR 121, 231, 232, 415, 417
  3. Other Requirements
    1. One Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course chosen from among: JOUR 330†, 340†, or 348†: 3 s.h.
    2. Journalism Electives: 18 s.h.
      In choosing journalism electives, students are encouraged to select courses that will allow them to develop expertise in one of the three available areas: advertising, news/editorial, or public relations. Included must be 6 s.h. of journalism electives at the 400-level.
    3. Any Minor: 16–20 s.h.
    4. Open Electives: 4–8 s.h.

#The foreign language/global issues graduation requirement may be fulfilled by successfully completing one of the following: 1)an intermediate foreign language requirement; 2) a General Education global issues course; 3) a Journalism (JOUR) global issues course; or 4) an approved study abroad program.

†JOUR 330 or JOUR 340 or JOUR 348 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) graduation requirement.

Minors

Minor in English: 18 s.h.
  1. ENG 299: 3 s.h.
  2. English Electives: 15 s.h.
    At least three electives must be taken at the 300-400 level
Minor in Creative Writing: 17–18 s.h.
  1. ENG 285: 3 s.h.
  2. Choose one of the following three sequences: 6 s.h.
    1. ENG 385 and 485
    2. ENG 386 and 486
    3. ENG 387 and 487
  3. Choose one intermediate course in second genre: 2–3 s.h.
    ENG 385, 386, 387; THEA 409, 419
  4. Choose two literature courses from the following: 6 s.h.
    ENG 200, 201, 202, 300, 358, any 300-400 level course in English literature
Minor in Journalism: 18 s.h.
  1. JOUR 121, 231, 232: 9 s.h.
  2. 300- and 400-level journalism courses of which at least one is 400-level: 6 s.h.
  3. Additional journalism coursework: 3 s.h.
    Note: Ability to type is necessary in all journalism courses.
Minor in Professional Writing: 18 s.h.
  1. Core: 6 s.h.
    1. One course chosen from: ENG 380, ENG 381, BCOM 320
    2. ENG 483
  2. Four elective courses (two must be ENG courses) chosen from: 12 s.h.
    ENG 370, 380*, 381*, 383, 387, 480, 481 (when appropriate), 482, 484, 495; GCOM 217; BCOM 320*; JOUR 305, 330, 340, 348

*No course may count as core and elective in an individual’s degree plan.

Note: No more than one course which fulfills a requirement for a major may be counted in the minor.

Minor in Broadcast and Print Media

See Interdisciplinary Studies Minors.

Minor in Film

See Interdisciplinary Studies Minors.

Proficiency Examinations

Freshmen who have been in accelerated programs in high school or transfer students from other institutions of higher education may request permission to take a proficiency examination for English 180 or 280. The examinations will be given by the second week of each semester. A student will receive 3 s.h. of credit upon passing the examination. Direct inquiries to Writing Director, 127 Simpkins Hall.

Course Descriptions

ENGLISH (ENG)

100 Introduction to Writing. (3) Instruction and experience in the basics of clear, accurate, and effective paragraphs and essays. Required of students placed in the course during initial registration. Not open to students who have completed ENG 180 and 280 with a grade of C or above. Graded A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, or U.

180 College Writing I. (3) (General Education/ Communication Skills) Introduction to college writing, with an emphasis on the writing process, reflective writing, and critical thinking. All sections taught with word processors. Graded A, A-, B+, B, B-,C+, C, U, F. IAI: C1 900.

195 Introduction to Literature. (3) (General Education/Humanities) An introduction to outstanding works of prose, poetry, and drama which emphasizes the development of the reader’s interpretive skills. The course is designed to promote an appreciation of excellence in literature. For non-English majors. IAI: H3 900.

200 Introduction to Poetry. (3) (General Education/ Humanities) Reading and discussion of poetry from around the world, introducing students to selected traditions, questions of social justice, and methods of interpretation. IAI: H3 903.

201 Introduction to Fiction. (3) (General Education/ Humanities) Reading and discussion of prose fiction from around the world, introducing students to selected traditions, questions of social justice, and methods of interpretation. IAI: H3 901.

202 Introduction to Drama. (3) (General Education/ Humanities) Reading and discussion of plays from around the world, introducing students to selected traditions, questions of social justice, and methods of interpretation. IAI: H3 902.

205 Introduction to Shakespeare. (3) (General Education/Humanities) Reading and discussion of selected plays, with emphasis on modern methods of interpretation. For non-English majors. IAI: H3 905.

206 Issues in U.S. Literature. (3) (General Education/ Humanities) Reading and discussion of important works of American literature from several historical periods, with emphasis on their relation to American society and culture.

228 Introduction to British Literature. (3) Study of major historical periods of British literature by means of representative literary types, texts, and authors, and predominant genres. Prerequisite/Corequisite: ENG 180.

238 Introduction to American Literature. (3) Study of major historical periods of American literature by means of representative literary types, texts, and authors, and predominant genres. Prerequisite/Corequisite: ENG 180.

245 (cross-listed with AAS 245) Survey of African American Literature. (3) A literary and cultural introduction to the study of African American writers, organized chronologically, but with special emphasis upon the twentieth century. Not open to students with credit for AAS 245.

258 Introduction to World Literature. (3) Study of representative literary types, texts, and authors, and predominant genres from a range of cultures, both Western and non-Western. Prerequisite/Corequisite: ENG 180.

280 College Writing II. (3) (General Education/ Communication Skills) A second course in college writing, to be taken during sophomore year. Emphasis on the interaction between writer and reader. Prerequisites: ENG 180 and at least 24 s.h. earned. Designated sections taught with word processors. Graded A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, U, F. IAI: C1 901R.

285 Introduction to Creative Writing. (3) An introductory course for students who wish to explore various forms of poetry and short-fiction writing. ENG 285 or consent of instructor is prerequisite for ENG 385, 386, 485.

290 (cross-listed with BC 290) Introduction to Film. (3) (General Education/Humanities) Screening and discussion of films from around the world, introducing students to selected traditions, questions of social justice, and methods of interpretation (with laboratory). Not open to students with credit in BC 290. IAI: F2 908.

291 Introduction to New Media Literature. (3) Reading and discussion of new media from around the world, introducing emerging traditions, questions of social justice, and methods of interpretation.

299 Critical Methods of Reading and Writing. (3) Introduction to basic forms and conventions of critical writing, strategies of interpretation, and theoretical issues in literary studies. Prerequisites: ENG 180 (with a grade of C or better) and at least one of the following (with a grade of C or better): ENG 200, 201, 202, 206, 228, 238, 258, 290.

300 Short Story. (3) (General Education/ Humanities) A study of the modern short story as a literary form. 301 (cross-listed with WS 301) Women and Literature. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) The study of literature as an art practiced by women, with an examination of portrayals of women in literature. Not open to students with credit in WS 301. IAI: H3 911D.

302 Popular Forms of Literature. (3) Studies in selected popular forms of literature. Topics may include forms such as detective fiction, science fiction, westerns, horror, romance, adventure, or thrillers. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

304 Poetic Forms. (3) Study of a major form of poetic expression. May include a single genre (e.g. epic or lyric), or individual forms (e.g. sonnet or ode). The 188 course will also address both the technical vocabularies and major concepts of poetics. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

305 Non-Fiction Forms. (3) Study of one or more of the forms of non-fiction writing such as autobiography, diary, essay, epistolary, or non-fiction movements such as the New Journalism or creative non-fiction. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

306 Forms of the Novel. (3) An intensive study of one or more of the forms of the novel. Topics may include the epistolary, picaresque, gothic, or other forms. The course will also address narratology and major critical approaches to the novel. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

307 (cross-listed with WS 307) Issues for Women Writing. (3, repeatable to 6 for different topics) Reading, discussion, and writing focused on a particular social, cultural, or personal issue related to how and what women write. Not open to students with credit in WS 307. Prerequisite: ENG 299 or WS 190, or consent of instructor.

310 Forms of Drama. (3) A study of one or more of the forms of drama such as medieval morality and mystery plays, revenge tragedy, heroic tragedy, and comedy of manners. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

311 Studies in Medieval British Literature. (3) Studies of selected British literary works from the beginnings to about 1500, with the Old English and more difficult Middle English texts read in translation. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

312 Studies in Renaissance and Seventeenth-Century British Literature. (3) Studies of selected British literary works from 1485 to 1660. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

314 Shakespeare. (3) A study of the major comedies, histories, and tragedies along with a consideration of the historical, intellectual, and theatrical contexts in which they were written. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

319 Studies in Nineteenth-Century British Literature. (3) Investigates those qualities, issues, and forms which distinguish nineteenth-century British writers from their predecessors and which inform the literature of their successors. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

324 Studies in Twentieth-Century British Literature. (3) Investigates selected poetry, drama, fiction, and nonfiction in the context of changing social and political horizons characteristic of modern Britain. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

331 Studies in Nineteenth-Century American Literature. (3) Investigates the development of a distinctive American literature against the background of the cultural changes in an expanding nation. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

334 Studies in Twentieth-Century American Literature. (3) Investigates literary responses to the cultural expansions and fragmentations of twentiethcentury American life. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

335 Studies in American Poetry. (3) Focuses on one or more of the critical issues which have characterized the emergence and development of poetry in America. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

337 Contemporary American Literature. (3) Study of contemporary American fiction, poetry, non-fiction, drama, and film, emphasizing recent formal and thematic trends. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor. 340 American Nature Writing. (3) Study of selected literary works, primarily non-fiction, from the seventeenth century to the present, that explore the human engagement with the American landscape and its forms of life. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

346 (cross-listed with AAS 346) African American Fiction. (3) Study of selected African American short stories and novels from the beginning to the present, from Brown, Johnson, and Toomer to Ellison, Baldwin, Morrison, and beyond. Not open to students with credit for AAS 346. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

347 The Novel in Context. (3) Study of the novel in light of a particular context such as literary movements, social conditions, an award (Booker, Pulitzer, etc.), or political issues. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

348 Ethnic Literatures of the United States. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) Study of literary texts, authors, and genres from various ethnic groups in the U.S. Examinations of culturally specific and cross-cultural questions including issues of race, class, and gender. Prerequisite: ENG 280 or consent of instructor.

350 Postcolonial Literature. (3) (Global Issues) A study of texts that address the experiences of empire by writers from countries with a history of colonialism or works by writers who have migrated from formerly colonized countries. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

351 Marginalized Literature. (3) A study of texts by writers and/or about characters who are marginalized and underrepresented because of sexuality, disability, class, race, gender, or religion. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

353 Great Books. (3) Study of selected literary masterpieces, from the ancient Greeks through the present: European epics, drama, lyric poetry, and prose in English translation. IAI: H3 906.

354 (cross-listed with AAS 354) African Americans in American Film. (3) Analysis of the representation of African Americans in American films as a way to consider how imagery affects society’s attitudes about race. Films from early 20th century depictions of mammies to the 1990’s hip-hop sagas will be examined. Not open to students with credit in AAS 354. Prerequisite: AAS 100 or consent of instructor.

355 Myths, Legends, and Literature. (3) A literary study of myths and legends, with special emphasis on European myths and legends and their relationship to literature.

356 Literature of the Bible. (3) A study of the literary variety of the Testaments, including Biblical history, lyric poetry, biography, and letters, among other forms.

357 Nation and Literature. (3) (Global Issues) The study of literature by writers of a particular nation (or related nations) with special attention to that nation’s identity, history, cultural traditions, and international relations. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

358 Studies in Non-Western Literature. (3) (General Education/Multicultural Studies) (Global Issues) Study of selected literary works (in English translation) from developing countries, with attention to their distinctive forms and viewpoints. IAI: H3 908N.

368 Studies in Literary Theory. (3) Studies in selected works of literary theory. This course may focus on specific themes or topics such as structuralism, English and Journalism 189 hermeneutics, deconstruction, queer theory, or disability studies. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

370 Rhetorical Grammar. (3) Use of a rhetorical framework to study grammatical and discourse structures and to apply them to students’ own writing. Prerequisites: ENG 180 and 280. 372 The English Language in Historical and Social Contexts. (3) Origins and varieties of the English language and its acquisition. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

376 Professional Development Workshop. (1) Students prepare application materials for internships, jobs or further schooling, a portfolio of writing, and an essay that articulates personal and professional goals. Students will also take part in workshops for career and or educational opportunities for English majors. Prerequisite: junior standing.

380 Writing in the Humanities and Social Sciences. (3) The analysis and writing of various types of expository essays; students will have the opportunity to write about content from their major field. Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course. BGS writing online course. Prerequisites: ENG 180 and 280, or consent of instructor.

381 Technical Communication. (3) Study of characteristics, concepts, and procedures involved in technical communication; practice in producing various types of technical communication including written and online formats. Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course. BGS online writing course. Prerequisites: ENG 180 and 280, or consent of instructor.

383 Public and Persuasive Writing. (3) Reading, analyzing, and writing texts from various public, persuasive discourses: political rhetoric, legal discourse, media presentations, and other cultural scripts. Prerequisites: ENG 180 and 280.

384 Composition for Teachers. (3) An advanced writing course designed primarily for English education majors and minors; a study of the rhetorical process, practice in writing essays, and consideration of teaching composition. Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course. Prerequisite: ENG 280.

385 Writing Workshop: Poetry. (3) Further work in the writing of poetry. Prerequisite: ENG 285 or consent of instructor. 386 Writing Workshop: Fiction. (3) Further work in the writing of fiction. Prerequisite: ENG 285 or consent of instructor.

387 Writing Workshop: Nonfiction. (3) Work in the writing of literary nonfiction. Prerequisites: ENG 180 and 280, or consent of instructor.

389 Film Theory and Criticism. (3) Study of various critical approaches to film and an exploration of the theories informing these approaches (with laboratory). Prerequisite: ENG 290 or consent of instructor.

390 (cross-listed with BC 390) Film History. (3) This course is an historical survey that covers the international history of cinema from its origins to the present. It considers issues including the development of national film industries, national and international film movements, and the social history of film (with laboratory). Not open to students with credit in BC 390. Prerequisite: ENG 290 or consent of instructor.

392 National Cinemas. (3) (Global Issues) An intensive study of selected national cinemas, concentrating on how different nations have developed film industries and how these films have affected national identities. Prerequisite: ENG 290 or consent of instructor.

393 American Film Genres. (3) Study of American film genres including Westerns, gangster and detective films, musicals, horror and science fiction films, melodramas, and comedies (with laboratory). Prerequisite: ENG 290, ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

394 (cross-listed with BC 394) Documentary Film and Video. (3) History of documentary film and video with focus on the documentary as a medium of communication, information, and interpretation (with laboratory). Not open to students with credit in BC 394.

395 Film and Literature. (3) Selected literary works and their film adaptations will serve as the basis for the comparative analysis of the different aesthetics of literature and film (with laboratory). Prerequisite: ENG 290 with a grade of C or better, ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or permission of instructor.

400 Topics in Literature. (1–3, repeatable for different topics) A study of a special theme or topic in literature. Printed Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

401 Major Authors. (1–3, repeatable for different authors) A thorough study of the work of a major author or two closely related authors. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

408 Senior Honors Thesis. (1–4, repeatable to 4) An independent study project resulting in a substantial original paper. Students will work closely with a single instructor who will evaluate the project. Prerequisites: registration for departmental honors in English, approval of the thesis adviser and the departmental honors coordinator, and senior status in the university.

409 Independent Study. (1–3, repeatable to 3) Independent reading or research projects for the senior English major. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

433 Literature for Young Adults. (3) Survey of literature for secondary students grades 7–12. Emphasis on critical analysis, evaluation, and use of books in various genres.

466 Literature for Teachers. (3) Constructs teaching units for 6-12 grade students that integrate ageappropriate literary genres; and examines reading strategies derived from literary theory. Prerequisites: ENG 280 and 12 s.h. (or equivalent) of coursework in literature, or consent of instructor.

471 Language Diversity and Grammar for Teachers. (3) Examines the relationships among standard and nonstandard dialects and effective practices for teaching grammar. Prerequisites: ENG 280 and 372, or consent of instructor.

473 Topics in Linguistics. (3, repeatable for different topics to 6) Selected topic varies and will be announced in the printed course schedule book at each offering. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing, or consent of instructor.

474 World Englishes. (3) (Global Issues) An examination of the history, status, and linguistic features of Englishes around the world. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

476 Senior Seminar. (3, repeatable to 6 for different topics) Intensive exploration of a major issue, era, author or text, culminating in the writing of a substantial scholarly essay. Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course. Prerequisites: ENG 280, ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, senior standing, or consent of department chairperson.

480 Computers and Writing. (3) Practice and study of computer-mediated communication. File management, word processing, networked communication, hypertext, and other current applications. Prerequisites: ENG 180 and 280.

481 Topics in Rhetoric and Composition. (3, repeatable for different topics to 6) Semester-long study of a topic in the theory, practice, pedagogy, or history of rhetoric and composition. Prerequisites: ENG 180 and 280.

482 Life Writing. (3) Examines issues relevant for writing biography and/or autobiography, focusing on memoir, family history, and/or creative nonfiction. Theory and practice of relevant techniques such as ghost writing, interviewing, and revision. Prerequisites: ENG 180 and 280, or permission of instructor.

483 Professional Editing. (3) Study of professional copy-editing techniques and practice editing manuscripts. Prerequisites: ENG 180, ENG 280, and departmental WID course.

484 Writing Center Tutoring. (3) Tutoring in the WIU Writing Center; includes intensive training and work experience in the Writing Center. Prerequisites: ENG 180, ENG 280, any departmental WID course, and permission of instructor. Graded S/U only.

485 Advanced Poetry Workshop. (3) An advanced course in writing poetry for students already accomplished in the genre. Prerequisites: ENG 285 and 385.

486 Advanced Fiction Workshop. (3) An advanced course in writing fiction for students already experienced in the genre. Prerequisites: ENG 285 and 386.

487 Advanced Nonfiction Workshop. (3) An advanced course in writing nonfiction for students already experienced in the genre. Prerequisites: ENG 285 and 387.

492 (cross-listed with REL 492) Religion, Literature, and Film. (3) (Global Issues) Study of multicultural literary and cinematic texts engaging a wide range of religious traditions. Not open to students with credit for REL 492. Prerequisite: ENG 299 with a grade of C or better, or one 100- or 200-level religious studies or philosophy course, or consent of instructor.

494 (cross-listed with BC 494 and WS 494) Women and Film/Television. (3) An overview of women in film and television that considers the on-screen images of women as well as the positions of women working behind the scenes (with laboratory). Not open to students with credit for BC494 or WS 494. Prerequisite: ENG 280.

495 Internship. (1–12, repeatable to 12) Actual work assignments and on-the-job experiences in businesses and public agencies which value the skills of intellect, imagination, research, reading, and writing of the English major. Prerequisite: permission of department chairperson. Graded S/U only.

496 (cross-listed with BC 496) Topics in Film. (3) Study of major subjects and themes in film. Topics vary but may include intensive study of directors such as Alfred Hitchcock and Federico Fellini, or artistic movements such as Italian Neorealism, French New- Wave, Contemporary Spanish Cinema, or Russian Formalism. Not open to students with credit in BC 496. Prerequisites: ENG/BC 290, ENG/BC 390, and 6 s.h. in approved film minor electives, or permission of instructor.

(English Education)

439 English Methods. (3) Preparation for student teaching, including analysis of techniques and materials useful to the English teacher in the secondary school. Observation and demonstration teaching. Open to English majors and minors. Prerequisites: EIS 301; ENG 384 and 466.

443 (cross-listed with LLA 443) Creative Uses of Literature for Children and Young Adults. (3) Presents the development of effective programs in informal and formalized interpretive experiences for children and young adults, emphasizing individual creativity and sources for materials. Not open to students with credit for LLA 443. Laboratory. Prerequisite: LLA 313.

450 Language Arts Workshop. (3) Contemporary theory and strategies for teaching English and/or language arts.

480 See STCH 480.

499 Topics in English Education. (3) This course is designed to prepare students for teaching in middle and secondary schools by focusing on contemporary issues and controversies in education. Additionally, students will examine research methodologies and read a range of professional publications. Prerequisites: ENG 384 and 466.

JOURNALISM (JOUR)

100 News/Media Literacy. (3) Survey of the news and examination of ways that content and form affect people’s judgments, beliefs and attitudes about news and entertainment and views of public policies, violence, consumerism, sex, class, gender, race, age, appearance, sexual orientation and culture. Open to all students.

121 Introduction to Mass Communications. (3) How the mass media are organized and how they function in modern society; their technological basis, economic and political foundations, and social implications. Open to all students. IAI: MC 911.

231 Reporting for the Mass Media I. (3) Laboratory in news gathering, news writing, and news judgment. IAI: MC 919.

232 Reporting for Mass Media II. (3) Practice in news writing and reporting with emphasis on accuracy, gracefulness, and succinctness. Practice in lead-selection and news judgment. Prerequisites: JOUR 231 or consent of instructor.

305 Reviewing and Criticism. (3) Practice in reviewing books, plays, films, concerts, radio-television programs, and exhibits. Prerequisite: JOUR 121, 231 and 232, or consent of instructor.

306 Editorials. (3) Practice in writing editorials and columns with an emphasis on calling for action, taking a position, analyzing events, and supporting assertions with research. Prerequisite: JOUR 121, 231 and 232, or consent of instructor.

328 Editing. (3) Functions, responsibilities, and techniques of news editing; evaluation and processing of news; practice in copy editing, headline writing, picture editing, and page makeup and rewrite. Prerequisites: JOUR 121, 231, and 232, or consent of instructor.

329 Fundamentals of Public Relations. (3) Principles, methods, and activities used by individuals, corporations, governmental bodies, and organizations to promote a favorable relationship with their publics. Open to nonmajors.

330 Magazine and Feature Writing. (3) Practice in writing and placing fact-based articles for general-interest and specialized magazines, and for newspapers. Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course. Prerequisites: JOUR 121, 231, and 232, or consent of instructor.

331 Advertising Principles and Practice. (3) Advertising fundamentals; economic and social issues; research needs; and creative and production practices of advertising agencies. Open to non-majors.

332 Sports Writing. (3) Development of reporting skills needed to cover traditional and new sports; development of critical thinking to clarify rules, regulations, and problems in sports. Prerequisites: JOUR 121, 231, and 232; or consent of instructor.

333 Specialized Press. (3) Makeup, illustration, copy preparation, advertising, and editorial policies of newsletters and other organizational publications. Prerequisites: JOUR 121, 231, and 232, or consent of instructor.

334 Public Affairs and Beat Reporting. (3) Practice in reporting various news beats including government, business, environment, religion, education, health, seniors, transportation, agriculture, and sciencetechnology. Prerequisites: JOUR 121, 231 and 232, or consent of instructor.

335 Photojournalism. (3) Digital photojournalism: the production of news and feature page photographs as singles, spreads, stories, and essays. Prerequisite: JOUR 231 or consent of instructor.

336 Public Relations Strategy and Campaigns. (3) Analysis of public relations problems and procedures; practice in applying social science principles and research techniques to solve public relations problems; preparing public relations materials. Prerequisite: JOUR 121 and 329, or consent of instructor.

340 Public Relations Writing: Techniques and Style. (3) Techniques of public relations writing for print and broadcast media, and for special audiences; public relations research; legal considerations. Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course. Prerequisites: JOUR 121 or consent of instructor.

343 Creative Strategy in Advertising. (3) Techniques and strategies used to create advertising including those related to design, graphics, makeup, and production. Prerequisite: JOUR 121 and 331, or consent of instructor.

344 Advertising Media Planning. (3) Analysis of the various advertising media in terms of markets served, client needs, media interactions, and message factors considered in the planning and selection of media. Prerequisites: JOUR 121 and 331, or consent of instructor.

348 Advertising Copy and Layout. (3) Principles and practice of writing advertising copy for mass media; using technology to prepare layouts; portfolio development. Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course. Prerequisites: JOUR 121 and 331, or consent of instructor.

400 Topics in Journalism. (3, repeatable for different topics) Discussion, research, and creation of content about special topics related to gathering, packaging, and presenting nonfiction material to an audience in various media, and how audiences receive and respond to the communications. Prerequisites: JOUR 121, 231, 232.

404 Field Work in Journalism. (1–12, repeatable to 12) Credit for internships at newspapers, magazines or other publications, or in advertising or public relations offices. By arrangement. See department chair or journalism coordinator. No more than 6 s.h. can be used in the Journalism major, and no more than 3 s.h. of that can count toward the 400-level elective requirement. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

410 International Communication and the Foreign Press. (3) (Global Issues) Comparative study of journalism practices and of the mass media in representative countries; factors that determine the international flow of news. Open to non-majors. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

412 Problems in Contemporary Mass Communications. (3) Research into current social, economic, political, and professional problems affecting the mass media. Open to non-majors. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

414 Ethics in Journalism. (3) Explore ethical problems of media industries (including news, public relations, and advertising) and methods of resolution, including study of moral theories and application of case study techniques. Prerequisite: JOUR 121 or consent of instructor.

415 Mass Communications Research Methods. (3) Introduction to questionnaire construction, sampling, research design, and statistical methods used in mass communications research including those in advertising and public relations. Open to non-majors. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

417 Law of Mass Communications. (3) Study of legal rights of and constraints on mass media: prior restraint, publicity control, source protection, libel, privacy invasion, and other relevant legal issues. Open to nonmajors. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

425 Directed Study. (1–6, repeatable to 6) Opportunity for promising students of journalism to pursue journalism and mass communications material in depth. By arrangement. See department chair or journalism coordinator. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

427 History of Mass Communications. (3) History of journalism and the mass media in the context of political, social, and economic change with an emphasis on press freedom and responsibility. Open to non-majors. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

428 The Press and Popular Culture. (3) Study of how the press and journalism have been viewed in popular culture, and of how changes in social climate and in journalists’ activities over the past century have affected these views. Open to non-majors. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

436 International Public Relations. (3) (Global Issues) Comparative study of the nature, scope, and practice of international public relations for businesses, trade associations, nonprofit organizations, and educational and governmental institutions. Global and intercultural aspects of public relations will be emphasized. Open to non-majors. Prerequisite: Jour 329 or consent of instructor.