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Health Sciences

Chairperson: Dr. Mark Kelley
Office: Stipes Hall 402
Telephone: (309) 298-1076
Fax: (309) 298-2076
E-mail: HealthSciences@wiu.edu; SE-Dorsett@wiu.edu
Website: wiu.edu/health
Faculty: Bezold, Bilotti, Clerc, Divin, Gebrewold, Graham, Hamilton-Hancock, Johnson, Kelley, Marchand, Moore, Oden, Parsons, Rozdilsky, Wen.

The mission of the Department of Health Sciences is to provide quality learning experiences and professional preparation for students, and to promote excellence in learning, application of technology, teaching, scholarship, and community service.

The Department of Health Sciences offers a Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences,  a Bachelor of Science in Health Services Management, and a Bachelor of Science in Emergency Management.

The degree program in Health Sciences allows students to pursue one of the following:

Community Health Education: Community health educators are professionally prepared in the disciplines of community and public health education. They demonstrate competence in planning, implementation, and evaluation of health promoting and health enhancing programs for individuals, groups, and communities.

Environmental and Occupational Safety: Environmental and occupational safety specialists analyze various environments and design programs to control, eliminate, and prevent disease or injury caused by chemical, physical, radiological, and biological agents or ergonomic factors that impact workers’ safety. Other preparation includes the development of health and safety policies and procedures to evaluate and coordinate programs that impact the environment, such as storage and handling of hazardous waste or monitoring the cleanup of contaminated air, water, or food.

The Health Services Management degree program prepares students for the following career opportunities:

Long Term Care Administration: This discipline includes a wide spectrum of health care delivery involving the complete continuum of chronic care management and administration—nursing home, rehabilitation, senior care, palliative care, specialized long term chronic care, and mental health.

Private Sector: The private sector includes many different areas of primary care delivery management and administration. Careers in this emphasis will focus on primary health care delivery in settings such as hospitals, outpatient clinics, physician practices, managed care organizations, health insurance companies, and pharmaceutical sales companies.

Public Sector: This sector includes all areas of public health management and administration. Career opportunities for public health managers and administrators include employment in public health departments at the local, county, state, and federal levels; health agencies focused on at-risk populations such as senior care and Medicaid populations; and voluntary and community health agencies.

The Emergency Management degree program will prepare students to become future leaders who will create and administer emergency plans, coordinate disaster response, and develop and utilize communication networks for addressing natural catastrophes (tornadoes, floods, earthquakes, and hurricanes), technological disasters (hazardous materials spills and nuclear power plant emergencies), and weapons of mass destruction incidents.

GradTrac is available to Health Sciences, Health Services Management, and Emergency Management majors.  See more information about GradTrac

Honors Curriculum - Academically qualified students in this department are welcome to complete an honors curriculum in University Honors, Upper Division Honors, or Lower Division Honors. All Honors students must complete the one-hour honors colloquium (G H 299). Lower Division Honors includes General Honors coursework. Upper Division Honors includes honors work in the major. University Honors combines Upper and Lower Division Honors. For more information about honors curriculavisit the Centennial Honors College website at www.wiu.edu/Honors

Degree Programs

Bachelor of Science—Health Sciences

All students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences must complete I, II, III, IV, and V. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 120 s.h. A maximum of 6 s.h. of workshop coursework (EOS 450/HS 450/HE 450/HSM 450) can count toward the degree.

  1. University General Education Curriculum:   43 s.h.
  2. Core Courses:  41 s.h.
    EOS 310; HS 211, 250, 370†, 410, 411, 412, 490; MICR 200; ZOOL 230, 231
  3. Directed Electives:  27 s.h.
    1. Choose one of the following emphases:
      1. Community Health Education (15 s.h.) HS 313, 400, 413, 414, 444
      2. Environmental and Occupational Safety (15 s.h.) EM 478; EOS 270, 311, 377, 417
    2. Choose directed electives in consultation with adviser (12 s.h.)
  4. Other Requirements
    CHEM 101*, HE 120*, STAT 171*:  9 s.h.
  5. Open Electives:  9 s.h.

†HS 370 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) graduation requirement.
*May count toward the University General Education requirement.

Bachelor of Science - Health Services Management

All students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Health Services Management must complete I, II, III, IV, and V. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 120 s.h.

  1. University General Education Curriculum:  43 s.h.
  2. Core Courses:  52 s.h.
    EOS 310, 311; HE 120*; HS 211, 250, 410, 414, 490; HSM 212, 314, 315†, 470; MICR 200; ZOOL 230, 231
  3. Directed Electives:  9 s.h.
    Choose 9 s.h. from one of the following emphases:‡
    1. Long Term Care: FIN 371, MGT 350, MGT 425, SOC 405
    2. Private Sector: ACCT 202, B L 431, FIN 351, MGT 448, OM 352
    3. Public Sector: EOS 417, HS 313, HS 411, HS 412, HS 413
  4. Other Required Courses:  24 s.h.
    ACCT 201, CS 101, ECON 231*, ECON 232*, FIN 311, HRM 353, MGT 349, STAT 171*
  5. Open Electives:  3 s.h.

*May count toward completion of the University General Education requirement.
†HSM 315 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) graduation requirement.
‡Directed electives may require fulfillment of one or more prerequisites.

Bachelor of Science - Emergency Management

All students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Emergency Management must complete I, II, III, IV, and V. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 120 s.h.

  1. University General Education Curriculum:  43 s.h.
  2. Core Courses:  33 s.h.
    EM 276, 304, 305†, 323, 324, 401, 420, 460, 490
  3. Directed Electives:  12 s.h.
    Choose 12 s.h. from the following: EM 306, 351, 352, 461, 477, 478; HS 411; GEOG 308, 430; LEJA 310; MICR 200,
  4. Other Requirements
    1. Other Required Courses:  13 s.h.
      CHEM 101*, CS 101, HE 120*, GEOG 120*
    2. An Approved Minor:  16-21 s.h.
  5. Open Electives:  7-12 s.h.

*May count toward completion of the University General Education requirement.
†EM 305 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) graduation requirement.

Minors

Minor in Community Health:  18 s.h.

A minor in community health must take a minimum of 3 s.h. each from

  • Categories One, Two, Three and Four; and additional credits from Category Five to total 18 s.h.
  • Category One: HS 211:  3 s.h. 
  • Category Two: HSM 314 or HS 411 or HS 412:  3 s.h. 
  • Category Three: HS 313 or HS 413 or HS 414:  3 s.h. 
  • Category Four: EOS 310 or EOS 311 or EOS 317:  3 s.h. 
  • Category Five: See adviser for directed electives: 8 s.h. 

Emergency Management:  18 s.h.

  1. Required Courses: EM 276, 304, 305, 461:  12 s.h.
  2. Electives: CH 317, 411; EM 306, 460; GEOG 308, 430; HE 351, 352; HSM 314; LEJA 306, 310, 481; OS 477, 478; POLS 300:  6 s.h.

Minor in Health Services Management:  20-21 s.h.

  1. Required Courses: EOS 377; HS 211, 250; HSM 314, 470:  14 s.h.
  2. Electives: EOS 311; HS 412, 414; HSM 315; MICR 200:  6-7 s.h. 

Minor in Occupational Safety;  20 s.h.

(Law Enforcement and Justice Administration majors see your adviser.)

  1. Required Courses: EM 276; EOS 270, 310, 311, 377:  14 s.h.
  2. Electives: (see adviser):  6 s.h. 

Course Descriptions

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT (EM)

276  Hazards and Disasters in Emergency Management. (3)  Overview of the dynamic relationships between natural and technological hazards and disasters and associated requirements for mitigation, preparation, response, and recovery.

304  Principles of Emergency Management (3).  Presents the theories, principles, and approaches to emergency management. Philosophy of comprehensive emergency management will be discussed including mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. Role, duties, and importance of the emergency manager will be discussed. Prerequisite: EM 276.

305  Dimensions of Disaster. (3)  Overview of empirical vs. theoretical approaches to disasters; human behavior in disaster, disaster myths; group disaster behavior; community social systems and disaster; cultures, demographics and disaster behavior distinctions, and contemporary disaster research. Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course. Prerequisites: EM 304 and ENG 280, or permission of instructor.

306  Individual and Community Disaster Education. (3)  Provides an extensive study of the design, implementation, and evaluation of public disaster preparedness education programs. Model preparedness education programs, teaching materials, and educational methods and techniques will be examined. Prerequisites: EM 304 and 305, or permission of instructor.

323  Emergency Preparedness and Response. (3)  Concepts, theories, principles, programs, and requirements of emergency preparedness; governmental planning, practice, exercises; hazard and risk assessment; team building; case studies. Overview of the relationship of preparedness to response; emergency operations; incident command systems; National Incident Management System (NIMS), interoperability. Prerequisite: EM 304.

324  Legal Aspects of Emergency Management. (3)  Introduction to federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and policies governing emergency management; history of statute development; significant legislation; federal, state, and local authorities and responsibilities. Prerequisite: EM 304.

351  (formerly HE 351)  Emergency Medical Technician's Training IA. (4)  Includes experiences designed to prepare persons who are responsible for giving emergency care to the sick and injured. The American Heart Association "CPR" certificate is included. Necessary as a prerequisite for EM 352 and state certification as an EMT.

352  (formerly HE 352)  Emergency Medical Technician's Training IB. (4)  May include sessions with paramedics, directors of ambulance services, respiratory therapists, and physicians; ten hours of hospital observation in an approved emergency room; and extrication exercise. Satisfactory completion of EM 351 and 352 and recommendation of instructor results in student eligibility to take EMT state examination. Prerequisite: EM 351 and consent of instructor.

401  Hazard Mitigation and Disaster Recovery. (3)  Concepts, theories, principles, programs, and requirements of pre- and post-disaster hazard mitigation; governmental planning and practice; hazard and risk assessment; team building; case studies; project development. Overview of disaster recovery programs and requirements; public and individual assistance; hazard mitigation relationships. Prerequisite: EM 304.

420  Research Applications in Emergency Management. (3)  Introduction to research methods in emergency management including scientific method and model and hypothesis development and testing. Utilization of real-time and historic databases for immediate, intermediate, and long-term research needs for hazard and risk assessment and other planning purposes. Prerequisite: EM 305.

460  Weapons of Mass Destruction in Health Science. (3)  Provides an overview of weapons of mass destruction from the health sciences and emergency management perspectives. Examination of various forms of weapons of mass destruction and discussion of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention practices facing future professionals is included. Prerequisites: CHEM 101 and EM 304, or permission of instructor.

461  Business and Industry Emergency Management. (3)  Provides an analysis of governmental emergency management, legal requirements, employee and business disaster awareness and preparedness, public policy considerations, and coordination of community outreach. Prerequisite: EM 304 or permission of instructor.

477  (formerly OS 477)  Disaster and Fire Defense Planning. (3)  Covers disaster and fire defense planning, and the interrelationship between those two areas. The concepts and principles of community risk assessment and regional and cooperative procedures and plans, and the relationship of structural, climatic, and topographical variables to group fires, conflagrations, and natural disasters will be discussed. Prerequisites: acceptance into the Open Learning Fire Service Program for inservice fire/safety personnel by the Director of the School of Distance Learning and Outreach, or permission of the instructor.

478  (formerly OS 478)  Managerial Issues in Hazardous Materials. (3)  The role of the fire service in planning for, responding to, and managing hazardous material incidents. Prerequisite: permission of the Director of the School of Distance Learning and Outreach.

490  Emergency Management Internship. (9-12)  Provides field work experience and knowledge in appropriate emergency  management programs, under supervision of a qualified preceptor. Prerequisites: all coursework must be completed with the exception of 6 s.h. in the minor or General Education. Must have overall GPA 2.00 and major GPA 2.50. Graded S/U only.

ENVIRONMENTAL AND OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY (EOS)

270  (formerly OS 270)  Principles of Accident Prevention. (3)  An analysis of the tools, methods, content, and common problems associated with the establishing and administering of safety programs for homes, school, and industry.

310  (formerly CH 310)  Environmental Sciences. (3)  The principles and practices of public health sanitation. Includes discussion of water and air pollution, food and milk sanitation, housing, vector and rodent control, solid wastes, other general sanitation problems, and principles involved in water and waste water treatment plant operation. Also considered are local, state, and federal regulations relevant to the sanitary control of the environment. Prerequisite: HS 211 or permission of instructor.

311  (formerly CH 311)  Environmental and Occupational Health Problems. (3)  Overview of the recognition, evaluation, prevention, and control of chemical, physical, and environmental factors that impact human health in the workplace and community. Identification and evaluation of interventions for environmental and occupational health problems will be addressed. Prerequisite: HS 211 and MICR 200 or permission of instructor. Field study costs may be approximately $10.00.

316  (formerly CH 316)  Integrated Waste Management. (3)  An overview of management practices related to generation, handling, minimization, prevention, storage, processing, treatment, transfer, and disposal of municipal, hazardous, and special wastes. Emphasis is on safely managing wastes from generation through final disposal. Prerequisite: EOS 310.

317  (formerly CH 317)  Health Effects of Environmental Hazards. (3)  Identification and critical review of selected pollutants and physical factors in the ambient environment and effects of such exposures on human health. Prerequisites: EOS 310 and HS 211, or permission on instructor.

377  (formerly OS 377)  Occupational Safety. (3)  A study of the fundamentals of industrial hygiene, hazardous waste regulations, accident causation theories, and workplace violence. OSHA General Industry 30-hour certification available to students.  Prerequisite: EOS 270.

417  (formerly CH 417)  Field Experiences in Public Health Sanitation. (3)  An analysis of selected sanitation laws, regulations, and ordinances. In-the-field experience will enable the student to observe the application of the codes in an enforcement setting and to gain expertise in the practical aspects of public health sanitation. Prerequisite: EOS 310 and senior standing.

450  (formerly CH 450)  Environmental Health Workshop. (1, repeatable to 2 with change in topic)  Examination of environmental concerns that may impact directly or indirectly on humans and their surroundings. Educational strategies and abatement measures are included. Prerequisite: senior standing or permission of instructor.

499  (formerly OS 499)  Independent Study in Environmental and Occupational Safety. (1–4, repeatable to 4)  Independent research study of an approved topic. Prerequisite: senior department major or minor, or permission of instructor.

HEALTH EDUCATION (HE)

120  Personal Health Promotion. (2)  (General Education/Human Well-Being)  Designed to enhance students' physical, intellectual, emotional, social, and spiritual health which will enable them to pursue their college and life goals more effectively.

121  Human Sexuality. (2)  (General Education/Human Well-Being)  The anatomical, physiological, psychological, and sociological characteristics unique to men and women, and what they bring to each other in their personal relationships.

123  Drug Use and Abuse. (2)  (General Education/Human Well-Being)  A comprehensive and in-depth study of the use and abuse of drugs in our society.

210  Student Health Education. (2, repeatable to 6)  This course provides in-depth training to selected students in critical areas of personal health. Trained student health educators present programs for residence halls, Greek organizations and recognized student groups, and serve as role models for positive lifestyle choices. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

251  First Aid. (2)  Theory and practice of first aid and CPR for the ill and injured. Instruction will be provided in accordance with the National Safety Council First Aid, and the American Heart Association Healthcare Provider standards.

321  (cross-listed with WS 321)  Women's Health. (3)  Provides information about how women can improve their chances of achieving and maintaining high level wellness. Among the topics included are: prevention, early detection and treatment of health problems commonly occurring among women, contraception, pregnancy and childbirth, using the medical care system, and mental health. Open to male and female students. Not open to students with credit in WS 321.

325  Multicultural Health Issues. (3)  (General Education/Multicultural Studies)  A survey of health issues that specifically affect African American Americans, American Indians, Hispanics, Asian Americans, and others. Health related lifestyles, behaviors, and prevention interventions will be emphasized. Prerequisite: HE 120, 121, 123, or permission or instructor.

360  Writing in the Health Disciplines. (1) Instruction and experience in writing professional health communication materials. Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course. Prerequisites: junior standing; completion of 12 s.h. of community health and health services management courses; ENG 280.

432  The Coordinated School Health Program. (3)  A description and analysis of the eight components of a K-12 coordinated school health program and the relationship of these components to the reduction of youth risk behaviors. Prerequisite: HS 313 or permission of instructor.

433  School Health Curriculum. (3)  Investigates the nature of school health curriculum development which addresses objectives, resources, content, evaluation, sequencing, scheduling, and implementation. Prerequisite: HE 432 or permission of instructor.

440  Sexuality Education in the Home, School, and Community. (3)  The principles of sex education of the pre-school and school-age child. Emphasis is placed on preparing the student in content, resources, procedures, and philosophy of home, school, and community sexuality education. Prerequisites: HE 121 (or its equivalent) and senior standing, or permission of instructor.

441  Mental Health. (3)  Personality development, mental dynamisms, the mature individual, and the mentally ill. Special emphasis is given to teacher-student relationships. Prerequisite: senior standing or permission of instructor.

442  Drug Education in the Home, School, and Community. (3)  Concepts of drug education with emphasis placed on preparing the student in content, resources, procedures, and philosophy of home, school, and community drug education. Prerequisites: HE 123 (or its equivalent) and senior standing, or permission of instructor.

450 Child and Adolescent Health Crisis Workshop. (1, repeatable to 2 with change in topic)  Designed to investigate the multidimensional dynamics of health problems and their relationship to child and adolescent risk behaviors. Possible topics include conflict resolution, substance abuse, eating disorders, suicide, gang involvement, cult-related activities, and media influence. Prerequisite: senior standing or permission of instructor.

450  Health Promotion Workshop. (1, repeatable to 2 with change in topic)  Designed to provide new and updated information relative to current health issues confronting the health promotion professional. Prerequisite: senior standing or permission of instructor.

450  School Health Workshop. (1, repeatable to 2 with change in topic)  Designed to provide new and updated information relative to current health issues confronting the school health professional. Prerequisite: senior standing or permission of instructor.

450  Sexuality Education Workshop. (1, repeatable to 2 with change in topic)  Provides professionally related information about sexuality. Concentrates on developing, organizing, implementing, and evaluating sexuality content and programs; addresses scope and sequences; and examines steps to an effective program. Prerequisite: senior standing or permission of instructor.

499  Independent Study in Health Education. (1 4, repeatable to 4)  Independent research study of an approved topic. Prerequisite: senior department major or minor, or permission of instructor.

HEALTH SCIENCES (HS)

211  (formerly CH 211)  Principles of Health Sciences. (3)  An introduction which emphasizes history, sociology, careers, and resources in community health and the interaction between school and community health programs. Also includes an overview of major community health programs. Prerequisite: HE 120 (or its equivalent) or permission of instructor.

250  (formerly HE 250)  Introduction to Medical Terminology. (2)  Designed to provide a working knowledge and understanding of health and medical terms. Students in health education, health services management, EMT, pre-professional healthcare programs, and all other health-related fields will particularly benefit. Learning, interpretation, and understanding is enhanced via discussion of word roots, prefixes, and suffixes.

302  (formerly CH 302)  Human Diseases II. (3)  Emphasis will be on inflammatory, communicable, and neoplastic diseases. Genetic, behavioral, public health, and environmental approaches will be applied. Prerequisites: HE 120 and MICR 200 or their equivalents, and HS 410, or permission of instructor.

313  (formerly CH 313)  Application of Theories and Concepts in Health Education. (3)  Provides a basic understanding of the application of theories and concepts related to health and health education. Concepts of health, behavior, learning, and group process, as well as community organization and networking included. Prerequisite: HS 211 or permission of instructor.

370  (formerly CH 370)  Research Methods in Health Sciences. (3)  The process of evaluating, planning, and organizing research studies for solving problems unique to health sciences. Introduction to the application of the scientific method and statistics in health sciences research. Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course. Prerequisites: junior standing; completion of 12 s.h. of health sciences courses; ENG 280; STAT 171.

400  (formerly CH 400)  Grant Writing. (3)  Focuses on skills and techniques necessary to research and write grant proposals for nonprofit organizations, businesses, and government agencies. Prerequisite: HS 313 or permission of instructor.

410  (formerly CH 301/HS 301)  Human Diseases. (3)  An overview of human diseases commonly affecting humans. Emphasis on organic, systemic, disseminated, and multisystem diseases. Genetic, behavioral, and environmental approaches will be applied. Prerequisites: HS 250; MICR 200 or its equivalent; ZOOL 230 and 231 or their equivalents; or permission of instructor.

411  (formerly CH 411)  Principles of Epidemiology. (3)  Public health problem solving methods emphasizing biostatistics and epidemiology. Methods of epidemiologic investigation and research are included. Prerequisites: HS 410 or permission of instructor.

412  (formerly CH 412)  Public Health Administration. (3)  Overview of administrative responsibilities and organizational patterns of local, state, and national public health agencies including core functions and essential public health services. Includes focus on emergency preparedness and response, performance measurement and improvement, and communication. Prerequisites: 15 s.h. of professional health courses and senior standing, or permission of instructor.

413  (formerly CH 413)  Community Health Program Development and Evaluation. (3)  Focuses upon developing the skills necessary to carry out program development—assessing needs, planning, implementing, and evaluating—in community health settings. Prerequisites: HS 313 and 9 s.h. of community health or health education courses, or permission of instructor.

414  (formerly CH 414)  Ethical Conduct and Conflict in Health Sciences. (3)  Students will interpret ethical codes of conduct as set forth by professional organizations; conflict arising from existing and evolving codes of conduct will be examined using case studies as an arena for discussion. Prerequisites: 15 s.h. of professional health courses and senior standing, or permission of instructor.

444  (formerly CH 444)  Methods and Techniques of Health Education. (3)  This course focuses upon the practical application of health information involved with learning theories, diversity, and uniqueness of learners. It concentrates on skills in facilitation, using audio-visual equipment, and cognitive affective methodologies unique to the health profession. The student develops professional health communication skills in speaking, writing, and publishing. Prerequisites: HS 413 and 9 s.h. of professional health education and promotion coursework.

450  (formerly CH 450)  Health Sciences Careers Workshop. (1, repeatable to 2 with change in topic)  Current trends and issues affecting community health professions including professional preparation, job availability, and continuing education for professional growth. Designed for students and professionals in community health promotion, environmental health, and health services management. Prerequisite: senior standing or permission of instructor.

450  (formerly CH 450)  Health Sciences Workshop. (1, repeatable to 2 with change in topic)  Examination and analysis of significant current concerns and controversies in community health. Content varies according to contemporary issues. Prerequisite: senior standing or permission of instructor.

480  (formerly CH 480)  Seminar in Health Sciences. (2)  Study and discussion of selected community health topics. Prerequisite: senior department major or minor, or permission of instructor.

490  (formerly CH 490)  Professional Internship (9 12)  Provides field work experience and knowledge in appropriate community health services programs, under supervision of preceptor qualified by education and experience. Prerequisites: all coursework must be completed with exception of 6 s.h. in the minor or General Education. Must have overall GPA 2.00 and major GPA 2.50. Graded S/U only.

499  (formerly CH 499)  Independent Study in Health Sciences. (1 4, repeatable to 4)  Independent research study of an approved topic. Prerequisite: senior department major or minor, or permission of instructor.

HEALTH SERVICES MANAGEMENT (HSM)

212  Introduction to U.S. Health Policy. (3)  Equips future health services management professionals with a working knowledge of the U.S. health care delivery system.  Health policy is analyzed, utilized, and applied in the U.S. health care industry. Prerequisite: HS 211.

314  Health Care Management. (3)  Explores management theory and practice as it relates to middle management positions such as department heads and supervisors in hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, long term care facilities, and other health care organizations. Prerequisite: HS 211 or permission of instructor.

315  Long Term Care Management. (3)  Application of management knowledge in resident care, personal, finance, environment, regulations, and organization specific to long term care facilities. Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course. Prerequisites: HS 211 and HSM 314.

450  Health Services Management Workshop. (1, repeatable to 2 with change in topic)  Designed to provide new and updated information relative to current trends and issues in health services management. Prerequisite: senior standing or permission of instructor.

470  Legal Aspects of Health Services Management. (3)  Equips future health services management professionals with a working knowledge of health law. Provides necessary background on a variety of health care topics, preparing students to deal with common legal and practical problems facing health care professionals. Prerequisites: HSM 314 and junior standing, or permission of instructor.