2010-2011 Undergraduate Catalog

Chemistry

Chairperson: Dr. Rose McConnell
Office: Currens Hall 214
Telephone: (309) 298-1538
Fax: (309) 298-2180
E-mail: Chemistry1@wiu.edu
Website: wiu.edu/chemistry

Faculty: Ahmad, Guan, Huang, Jin, Kouassi, Made Gowda, J. McConnell, R. McConnell, Terry, Vinod, Wen.

Emeritus Faculty: Bath, Klopfenstein, Venugopalan.

Chemistry is the science of the composition, structure, properties, and reactions of matter, especially of atomic and molecular systems. It is the basis of the technology for the large-scale production of chemicals and chemical materials that are useful to modern society. The study of chemistry helps people understand the physical world and its workings. 

The Bachelor of Science in Chemistry degree program provides graduates a wide range of career opportunities. Graduates of the chemistry/biochemistry program find employment in industry, government agencies, and non-profit organizations. Types of work include basic research, applied research, analytical services, product development, marketing and sales, and manufacturing. Persons desiring to become practicing chemists/biochemists should select the Chemistry/Biochemistry options or the Chemistry/Biochemistry options certified by the American Chemical Society. The latter is recommended for students wishing to enter graduate school or seek employment in the chemical industry immediately upon graduation. The Science/Chemistry Teacher Certification option is designed to prepare students to become certified to teach high school science with a specialization in chemistry.

The Bachelor of Science in Forensic Chemistry prepares graduates with a strong chemistry background and a specialization in forensic sciences which will prepare them to work in modern laboratories at the local, regional, state, and federal levels. Graduates of the forensic chemistry program will be prepared for careers in modern crime laboratories and other law enforcement agencies as well as private chemical and pharmaceutical industries.

The chemistry faculty advise students enrolled in pre-professional programs in chemical engineering and pharmacy. The department also offers minors in chemistry, forensic chemistry, and forensic science.

GradTrac is available to Chemistry and Biochemistry majors. See more information about GradTrac

Honors Curriculum - Academically qualified students in this department are welcome to complete an honors curriculum in University Honors, Upper Division Honors, or Lower Division Honors. All Honors students must complete the one-hour honors colloquium (G H 299). Lower Division Honors includes General Honors coursework. Upper Division Honors includes honors work in the major. University Honors combines Upper and Lower Division Honors. For more information about honors curricula visit the Centennial Honors College website at www.wiu.edu/Honors

Integrated Baccalaureate and Master’s Degree Program - An integrated baccalaureate and master’s degree program is available in Chemistry and Forensic Chemistry.  An integrated degree program provides the opportunity for outstanding undergraduates to earn both degrees in five years. Please refer to the Graduate Studies catalog for details about the integrated program.

Degree Programs

Bachelor of Science - Chemistry

All students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry must complete I, II, and III.A. or III.B. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 120 s.h.

In accordance with the Illinois State Board of Education certification rules, all candidates seeking teacher certification are required by Western Illinois University to obtain a grade of “C” or better in all directed general education courses, all core courses, and all courses in the option. Note C- is below a C.

  1. University General Education and
    College of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Requirements:  55 s.h.
    Except teacher certification students must complete the University General Education Curriculum Requirements - 43 s.h.
  2. Core Courses:  20 s.h.
    CHEM 201*, 202*, 331, 332, 341
  3. Options of Study (select A, B, or C)
    1. Chemistry
      1. Special Courses: CHEM 374, 375, 401†, and 442:  17 s.h.
      2. Departmental Electives:  3 s.h.
      3. Open Electives: any minor:  16–20 s.h.
      4. Other
        1. MATH 133*, 134*, 231:  12 s.h.
        2. PHYS 197*, 198 or 124, 125:   8–10 s.h.
        3. CS 211 and 212 or higher:  3 s.h.
    2. Biochemistry
      1. Special Courses: CHEM 370 or 374, 416, 421, 422†, 429:  16 s.h.
      2. Departmental Electives:  7 s.h.
      3. Biology minor:  17 s.h.
      4. Other
        1. MATH 133*, 134*:  8 s.h.
        2. PHYS 197*, 198 or 124, 125:  8–10 s.h.
        3. CS 211 and 212 or higher:  3 s.h.
      5. Open Electives:  0–2 s.h.
    3. Science/Chemistry -Teacher Certification
      1. Special Courses
        1. CHEM 370 or 374; 401;  442;  482†:  16 s.h.
        2. BIOL 100*, 101*, 481:  11 s.h.
        3. GEOL 110*, 112*:  8 s.h.
        4. PHYS 101*, 197*, 198:  11 s.h.
      2. Directed Electives
        1. Departmental Electives:  3 s.h.
      3. Other
        1. Educ 439:  3 s.h.
        2. EIS 201, 301, 302, 303 (1 s.h.), 304 (1), 401:  13 s.h.
        3. MATH 133*, 134*:  8 s.h.
        4. SPED 310 and SPED 390 or PSY 425 and SPED 390:  4 s.h.
        5. STCH 480:  12 s.h.

*University General Education course. 10-16 s.h. may count toward Natural Sciences/Mathematics requirement.
†CHEM 401 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) graduation requirement for the Chemistry non-teaching option. CHEM 422 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) graduation requirement for the Biochemistry option. CHEM 482 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) graduation requirement for the Science/Chemistry-Teacher Certification option.

Bachelor of Science - Forensic Chemistry

Students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Forensic Chemistry must complete I, II, III, and IV. The minimum semester hour requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 123 s.h.

  1. University General Education and
    College of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Requirements:  55 s.h.
  2. Core Courses:  48 s.h.
      CHEM 201*, 202*, 331, 332, 341, 401†, 416, 421, 442, 451, 452; BOT 200*; ZOOL 200*
  3. Directed Electives:  7 s.h.
      CHEM 370 or 374
      CHEM 485 or 490
  4. Other Requirements:  28-31 s.h.
    1. MATH Requirements (8 s.h.)
      MATH 133*, 134*
    2. Physics Requirement (8-10 s.h.)
       PHYS 197* and 198, or PHYS 124 and 125
    3. Computer Science Requirement (3 s.h.)
       CS 211 and 212, or higher level CS course
    4. Law Enforcement Requirement (6 s.h.)
      LEJA 101, and LEJA 242 or 303
    5. Choose one of the following (3 - 4 s.h.):
      ANTH 405, BIOL 330, GEOL 110*, MICR 200

*University General Education course. 16 s.h. may count toward Natural Science/Mathematics requirement.
†CHEM 401 fulfills the Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) graduation requirement.

Minors

Minor in Chemistry:  20–21 s.h.

  1. Core Courses: CHEM 201, 202, and 330 or 331:  13 s.h. 
  2. Any two courses from: CHEM 332, 341, 342, 370/374, 375, 421, 463:  7–8 s.h. 

Minor in Forensic Chemistry:  20-21 s.h.

  1. Core Courses: CHEM 201, 202, 330, 440: 17 s.h. 
  2. Select one of the following:  3 - 4 s.h. 
    1. CHEM 485 - internship at a state laboratory with placement approval by minor adviser.
    2. One course selected from: ANTH 405, BIOL 330, CHEM 342, CHEM 421, MICR 200, MICR 434, ZOOL 430
      Note: This minor is not open to students majoring in chemistry.

Minor in Forensic Science:  19-20 s.h.

  1. Core Courses: CHEM 101, 102, 221, 440:  16 s.h.
  2. Select one of the following options: 3-4 s.h.
    1. CHEM 485 -  internship at a state laboratory with placement approval by minor adviser.
    2. One course selected from: ANTH 405, BIOL 330, CHEM 342, MICR 200, MICR 434, ZOOL 430
      Note: This minor is not open to Students majoring in chemistry.

Pre-Professional Programs

Pre-professional programs in Chemical Engineering and Pharmacy are available. See Pre-Professional Programs (p. ___) for a detailed description of the requirements.

Certification by the American Chemical Society

Western Illinois University is approved by the American Chemical Society for undergraduate professional training in Chemistry and Biochemistry. Students who are pursuing the B.S. in Chemistry may qualify for certification by completing the following coursework:

Certification in Chemistry

  1. CHEM 201, 202, 331, 332, 333, 341, 374, 375, 401, 416, 421, and 442
  2. Elect one course from CHEM 490/491/475
  3. PHYS 197 and either 198 or 200

Certification in Biochemistry

  1. CHEM 201, 202, 331, 332, 341, 374, 375, 401, 421, 422, 429, 442, 490/491/475
  2. PHYS 197 and 198

Recommended High School Subjects for Students Planning to Major in Chemistry

  1. English: four years
  2. Mathematics: four years
  3. Chemistry: one year
  4. Physics: one year

The First-Year Course in Chemistry

  1. Students requiring two or more years of chemistry should take CHEM 201 and 202.
  2. Students requiring only one year of chemistry or forensic science minor should take CHEM 101 and 102.
  3. Students without one year of chemistry in high school are required to take CHEM 100 before taking CHEM 101 or 201.

Course Descriptions

CHEMISTRY (CHEM)

Illinois law requires that safety goggles must be worn in all laboratory classes. (Senate Bill 1190)

100  Introduction to Chemistry. (3)  For those students who have completed less than the equivalent of one year of high school chemistry. Introduces the fundamental concepts of chemistry including matter, atomic structure and periodicity, stoichiometry, some descriptive chemistry. Prerequisite: one year high school algebra or MATH 099N. 3 hrs. lect.

101  General Chemistry I. (4)  (General Education/Natural Sciences)  A survey for students who do not plan to take chemistry beyond the 100 level. Application of the general principles of inorganic and organic chemistry to biological, environmental, and applied sciences. Prerequisites: one year of high school algebra or MATH 099N, and either one year high school chemistry or CHEM 100. 3 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.
IAI: P1 902L.

102  General Chemistry II. (4)  (General Education/Natural Sciences)  A continuation of CHEM 101. Prerequisite: CHEM 101. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab.

150  Contemporary Chemistry. (4)  (General Education/Natural Sciences)  A course intended to inform the student of the role of science in modern society. Lectures treat the fundamentals of chemical composition; the impact of industrial products on the environment, energy, and drugs; and the importance of consumer information. 3 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab.
IAI: P1 903L.

201  Inorganic Chemistry I. (4)  (General Education/Natural Sciences)  Designed for science and pre-engineering majors. Fundamental physicochemical principles and quantitative relationships including the mole concept, periodic properties of the elements, atomic structure, chemical bonding, and thermochemistry. Laboratory emphasizes quantitative analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 100 and either one year of high school chemistry or CHEM 100; Corequisite: either MATH 101, 102, 106, 123, or 128, or math course requiring one of these as a prerequisite. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab.
IAI: CHM 911.

202  Inorganic Chemistry II. (4)  (General Education/Natural Sciences)  A continuation of CHEM 201. Includes a study of solutions, acids and bases, equilibria, electrochemistry, and chemistry of the main group elements and the transition elements. Laboratory emphasizes qualitative analysis, quantitative measurements, and syntheses. Prerequisite: CHEM 201. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab.
IAI: CHM 912.

221  Elementary Biochemistry. (4)  An elementary course intended to teach the structure, properties, function, and metabolism of biological molecules with emphasis on macromolecules. Intended for biology and family and consumer sciences majors. Prerequisite: CHEM 102. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab.

263  Introduction to Pharmacology. (3)  This course introduces the students to the basic concepts of pharmacology and the major categories of pharmacologic agents, and explores the myths and facts about vitamins, nutritional supplements, and common herbal medicines. Prerequisites: either BIOL 101 or ZOOL 200 or ZOOL 230; and either CHEM 102 or CHEM 330.

264  Pharmacy Methods. (3)  This course is designed as an aid for students who plan a career in pharmacy. The course describes methods used in pharmacy, including receiving and processing prescriptions, drug calculations, dosage and formulations, pharmacy law, and inventory control. Prerequisite: CHEM 263 or permission of the instructor.

330  Elements of Organic Chemistry. (5)  A one-semester introduction to organic chemistry. Coverage includes nomenclature of compounds, study of selected reactions and mechanisms, spectroscopy and study of biologically relevant molecules such as carbohydrates, amino acids, and proteins. Does not count toward chemistry major. Prerequisite: CHEM 202 (C grade or better). 4 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab.

331  Organic Chemistry I. (5)  A study of nomenclature, preparations, reactions, and reaction mechanisms of the functional groups of aliphatic and aromatic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 202 (C grade or better). 4 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab.
IAI: CHM 913.

332  Organic Chemistry II. (4)  Further study of organic chemistry including spectroscopic methods. Laboratory includes synthetic methods, mechanistic studies, chromatography, and an introduction to qualitative analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM 331 or CHEM 330 (C grade or better). 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab.
IAI: CHM 914.

333  Advanced Organic Laboratory. (1)  Designed to supplement the laboratory portion of CHEM 332. Prerequisite: concurrent registration or credit in CHEM 332. 3 hrs. lab.

341  Analytical Techniques. (3)  An extension of the fundamental techniques used in CHEM 201 and 202 with emphasis on the analytical process, methods of separation, and methods of measurement. Prerequisite: CHEM 202. 2 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab.

342  Fundamentals of Environmental Chemistry. (4)  An examination of the chemistry of the geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere with emphasis on the interactions between them and the impact of technology upon the natural environment. Prerequisite: CHEM 102 or 202. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab.

363  Rational Drug Design. (3)  The course emphasizes the process of drug development, identification of drug targets, and their introduction into clinical practice. Basic principles of target identification and validation, chemical libraries and screening, receptor mechanisms and receptor targeting, ligand-based drug design are discussed. Prerequisite: CHEM 332.

370  Elementary Physical Chemistry. (4)  Designed primarily for students who wish an introduction to physical chemistry and its biological applications. Prerequisite: CHEM 202. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab.

374  Physical Chemistry I. (4)  Designed primarily for chemistry majors who wish a rigorous treatment of physical chemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 202, one year of physics, and one year of calculus. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab.

375  Physical Chemistry II. (4)  A continuation of CHEM 374. Prerequisite: CHEM 374. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab.

390  Junior Project Laboratory. (1 2, repeatable for different projects to 2)  Enrollment only with permission of department.

401  Inorganic Chemistry III. (4)  Chemistry of transition elements and nontransition elements and their compounds; nomenclature, stereochemistry, symmetry, bonding, solids, and acid-base theories. Laboratory involves synthesis and physicochemical measurements of selected compounds. Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course. Prerequisites: CHEM 332 and CHEM 370 or 374. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab.

416  Chemical Literature. (1)  An introduction to searching chemical research literature. Prerequisite: 18 s.h. of chemistry. 1 hr. lect.

421  Biochemistry. (4)  The chemistry of major cellular constituents and their metabolism. Prerequisite: CHEM 330 or 332. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab.

422  Advanced Biochemistry. (4)  A continuation of CHEM 421 emphasizing the regulation of biosynthetic pathways and gene expression. Laboratory includes analysis of biological molecules by GC, HPLC, UV spectroscopy, and electrophoresis. Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course. Prerequisite: CHEM 421. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab.

429  Biochemistry Topics. (1 5, repeatable for different topics to 5)  Advanced topics in biochemistry arranged in one or two credit hour blocks to accommodate special interests. Students may take one or any combination of the specific topics offered in a given semester. Prerequisite: CHEM 421.

440  Elementary Forensic Techniques. (4)  Applications of chemical principles to analysis of crime scene physical evidence including serology, drugs, explosive residues, arson debris, papers and inks, paint, and DNA fingerprinting. State-of-the-art techniques and instrumentation are used. Prerequisite: CHEM 221 or 330 or permission of instructor. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab.

442  Analytical Chemistry. (5)  Theory and practice of analytical chemistry with emphasis on selected instrumental techniques. Prerequisites: CHEM 341 and one semester of physical chemistry. 3 hrs. lect.; 6 hrs. lab.

451  Applications of Forensic Chemistry. (3)  Designed primarily for forensic majors. In-depth applications of physico-chemical principles to analysis of physical evidence from criminal investigations, including explosive residues, arson debris, hairs, fibers, glass, paint, papers, inks, and soil. State-of-the-art techniques and instrumentation are used. Cannot be applied toward the Chemistry minor. Prerequisites: CHEM 332, 341, 370 or 374, or consent of instructor. 2 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab.

452 Forensic Toxicology and DNA Analysis. (3)  Designed primarily for forensic majors. A continuation of CHEM 451. Applications of pharmacological, toxicological, and molecular biological principles to analysis of commonly encountered abused and toxic substances. Topics will include serology and DNA analysis. State-of-the-art techniques and instrumentation are used. Cannot be applied toward the Chemistry minor. Prerequisites: CHEM 451. Prerequisite or Corequisite: CHEM 421. 2 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab.

463  Advanced Pharmacology. (3)  This course introduces the students to the chemical aspects of drug-receptor interactions, pharmacokinetics, and parmacodynamics of major categories of pharmacologic agents. Not open to students who have credit for PSY 444. Prerequisites: CHEM 421 and either ZOOL 231 or ZOOL 430; or NURS 310 and permission of the instructor.

485  Internship in Chemistry. (3 8, repeatable to maximum of 8)  An on-the-job experience in a government or industrial laboratory. To familiarize students with working environments—laboratory procedures and instrumentation they will encounter in a job situation. A formal written report is required. Prerequisites: CHEM 332, 370 or 375, 442, junior or senior standing in chemistry, or permission of department chairperson. Graded S/U only.

490  Senior Project Laboratory. (1 4, repeatable to 4)  Laboratory research under the direction of a chemistry faculty member. The work will include the use of the chemical literature in independent research programs. A formal written report of the investigation undertaken is required. Prerequisites: one semester of physical chemistry and permission of the department.

491  Honors Thesis in Chemistry. (1 2, repeatable to 2)  A thesis prepared under the direction of one or more faculty members.

(Education)

482  (cross-listed with BIOL 482 and PHYS 482)  Science in Context. (3)  Interdisciplinary course designed for science majors pursuing secondary teacher certification. Students will explore science as inquiry, the unifying principles of science, and the role of social contexts and ethics in science. Writing Instruction in the Discipline (WID) course. Not open to students with credit in BIOL 482 or PHYS 482. Prerequisites: senior standing in Science/Chemistry-Teacher Certification option, or permission of instructor; ENG 280.

439  Methods of Teaching Secondary Science. (3)  Study of secondary teaching methods (Grades 6-12) from the standpoints of theory and practice, curriculum objectives and standard implementation, materials, and evaluation and assessment. Included are demonstrations, discussions, lectures, classroom participation, and field observations. Prerequisites: major in Science/Chemistry-Teacher Certification option and Educ 301. Corequisite: EIS 303.

480  Student Teaching.  See STCH 480.