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Melanie Hetzel-Riggin Ph.D, LP  

Associate Professor
131F Waggoner Hall
Work: 309/298-2604
Fax: 309/298-2179

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Additional Information

Education:

Dr. Hetzel-Riggin received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in August of 2005 from Northern Illinois University after completing her doctoral clinical internship at the Counseling and Student Development Center at Northern Illinois University. She is also a licensed clinical psychologist in the state of Illinois. Dr. Hetzel-Riggin’s dissertation investigated the role of peritraumatic dissociation, or dissociative experiences such as derealization and depersonalization that occur close in time to an event, on physiological reactivity to reminders of rape experiences.

Teaching Areas:

Dr. Hetzel-Riggin’s teaching interests include personality and adjustment, abnormal psychology, clinical psychology (especially cognitive and behavior therapy and clinical diagnosis), career counseling, trauma and crisis, and ethics and multiculturalism. She also supervises students in the Clinical and Community Mental Health Master's degree program and provides individual and family therapy in the Psychology Clinic.

Research Interests:

Dr. Hetzel-Riggin’s primary research interest is the assessment, prevention, and treatment of interpersonal violence (IPV), such as domestic violence, teen dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, and child abuse. In terms of assessment, Dr. Hetzel-Riggin is interested in the prevalence and incidence of IPV in specific populations (children, minority groups, etc.), risk and resiliency factors associated with IPV (coping styles, personality variables, social support, etc.), resulting psychopathology (posttraumatic stress, depression, eating disorders, etc.), and changes in behavior, cognition, physiology, and interpersonal relationships as a result of IPV. Dr. Hetzel-Riggin’s focus regarding prevention includes the effectiveness of primary prevention of IPV on campus and in the community and secondary prevention for individuals at risk for IPV. An overarching goal of her research is to identify factors that may interfere with therapy for IPV survivors and to find or develop adjuncts to treatments to overcome these factors.

Recent Scholarly Activities:

Meads, C.L. & Hetzel-Riggin, M.D. (in press). Factors that influence coping self-efficacy after trauma. Psychology of Coping: New Research.

Hetzel-Riggin, M.D., & Roby, R. (in press). Trauma type and gender effects on PTSD, general distress, and peritraumatic dissociation. Journal of Trauma and Loss.

Hetzel-Riggin, M.D. (2012, May). Does coping style mediate the effects of trauma type on PTSD? Poster to be presented at the eighty-fourth meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Meads, C.R., & Hetzel-Riggin, M.D. (2012, May). Factors that influence coping self-efficacy.” Poster to be presented at the eighty-fourth meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Harbke, C., & Hetzel-Riggin, M.D. (2012, April). Symptom severity and PTSD symptom cluster convergence: Importance of clinical samples. Poster to be presented at the annual meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association, Oklahoma, OK.

Hetzel-Riggin, M.D. (2012, April). Influences on Trauma Research Participation Reactions. Paper to be presented at the annual meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association, Oklahoma, OK.

Hetzel-Riggin, M.D. & Pritchard, J. (2011). Predicting problematic internet use in men and women: The contributions of psychological distress, coping style, and body esteem. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 14, 519-525.

Hetzel-Riggin, M.D., & Meads, C.L. (2011). Childhood violence and adult partner maltreatment: The roles of coping styles and psychological distress. Journal of Family Violence, 26, 585-593.