Department of Physics

Fall 2005 | Spring 2006 | Fall 2006 | Spring 2007 | Fall 2007 | Spring 2008 | Fall 2008 | Spring 2009 | Fall 2009 | Spring 2010 | Fall 2010 | Spring 2011 | Fall 2011 | Spring 2012 | Fall 2012 | Spring 2013 | Fall 2013 | Spring 2014 | Fall 2014 | Spring 2015 | Fall 2015 | Spring 2016 | Fall 2016 | Spring 2017 | Fall 2017 | Spring 2018

-------------------------

 

A Materials-Driven Approach to Condensed Matter Physics

Speaker: Dr. Nirmal J. Ghimire
Date: Friday, April 20, 2018
Time: 4pm
Room: 205 Currens Hall

Abstract:  Without materials, there can be no condensed matter physics. Indeed, the synthesis of new materials is often the key starting point for advancing our fundamental understanding of underlying physics as well as pursuing technological development. I will start this talk by giving a broad overview of the quest for new materials – Why do we do it? How do we do it? I will then focus on a specific class of materials discovery, the Weyl semimetal, which is essentially a three-dimensional analog of graphene. As such, A Weyl semimetal is a conductor whose low-energy bulk excitations are Weyl fermions. To illustrate these characteristics, I will discuss our recent study of the Weyl semimetal NbAs, presenting magnetotransport signature of Weyl fermions in this compound. Finally, I will briefly highlight some future opportunities in the area of topological matter, driven by specific materials design criteria.

About the speaker:  Dr. Nirmal Ghimire is a Director’s Postdoctoral Fellow in Materials Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. He uses solid state chemistry and metallurgical synthesis techniques to develop physical platforms for investigating topological properties, magnetism and their interactions in solids. Dr. Ghimire’s work primarily involves materials design, crystal growth, and characterization with an emphasis on transport property studies.

-------------------------

 

“Interference of Waves to Interference of Quantum Paths”

Speaker: Prof. Girish S. Agarwal
Date: Friday, April 6, 2018
Time: 4pm
Room: 203 Currens Hall

Abstract:  I will review several land mark effects in quantum optics and how these changed the growth of the field. Although each discovered in a different context, the underlying physics can be understood from a common theme –interference of quantum paths leading to observed signals. I would describe the new physics and a number of applications arising from the interference of independent photons especially in the preparation of entangled states. The interference of quantum paths provides a new understanding of the correlated spontaneous emission and superradiance and more generally the results of measurements on entangled states of a quantum system.

About the speaker:  Prof. Girish S. Agarwal, Texas A&M University, specializes in quantum optics and is the author of “Quantum Optics” published by the Cambridge University Press. He is author of more than 650 papers in Scientific Journals. His work has been recognized by a large number of awards, including the Max-Born Prize from the Optical Society of America in 1988, the physics prize of the World Academy of Sciences, the Humboldt Research Award (1997) of Germany and Honorary Doctorates from the University of Liege, Belgium and the University of Hyderabad. He held the Indian National Science Academy’s Albert Einstein Research Professorship. He was elected fellow of several societies – The Royal Society (UK), The World Academy of Sciences, American Physical Society; Optical Society of America, Indian National Science Academy. He was Director of the Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad, India and has served on the editorial boards of several journals in Optics and Physics. He received The Eminent Faculty Award of the Oklahoma State University where he was Noble Foundation Chair and Regents professor.

-------------------------

Superresolution Microscopy: Beating Diffraction Limit via Quantum Correlations

Speaker: Prof. Girish S. Agarwal
Date: Thursday, April 5, 2018
Time: 4pm
Room: 205 Currens Hall

Abstract:  It is well known that the diffraction of light limits the resolution achievable in microscopy. The diffraction barrier to resolution, for example, limits the transverse resolution to about lambda/2. In the last two decades techniques have been developed which allow one to achieve resolution of about 10 nm. Some of the newer techniques use quantum optical ideas. A review of the super-resolution microscopy, i.e., microscopy beyond diffraction limit would be presented. I will also review the newer developments that are based on a combination of structured illumination and correlation property of quantum emitters that yield a spatial resolution reaching far into the sub-classical regime. Further advantages of plasmonic illumination will be presented. The newer developments are applicable to a variety of microscopic techniques including two-photon and pump-probe.

About the speaker:  Prof. Girish S. Agarwal, Texas A&M University, specializes in quantum optics and is the author of “Quantum Optics” published by the Cambridge University Press. He is author of more than 650 papers in Scientific Journals. His work has been recognized by a large number of awards, including the Max-Born Prize from the Optical Society of America in 1988, the physics prize of the World Academy of Sciences, the Humboldt Research Award (1997) of Germany and Honorary Doctorates from the University of Liege, Belgium and the University of Hyderabad. He held the Indian National Science Academy’s Albert Einstein Research Professorship. He was elected fellow of several societies – The Royal Society (UK), The World Academy of Sciences, American Physical Society; Optical Society of America, Indian National Science Academy. He was Director of the Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad, India and has served on the editorial boards of several journals in Optics and Physics. He received The Eminent Faculty Award of the Oklahoma State University where he was Noble Foundation Chair and Regents professor.

-------------------------

Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory: History and Future

Nobel Prize in Physics 2017: Rainer Wies, Barry C. Barish, Kip S. Throne

Speaker: Prof. Kishor Kapale
Date: Friday, March 23, 2018
Time: 4pm
Room: 205 Currens Hall

Abstract:  The Nobel Prize in Physics 2017 was divided, one half awarded to Rainer Weiss, the other half jointly to Barry C. Barish and Kip S. Thorne "for decisive contibutions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves". I will discuss the history and future of the gravitational wave detection efforts.

About the speaker:  Dr. Kapale is a theoretical physicist whose research focuses on quantum optics, atomic optics, quantum information theory and applied quantum physics. Dr. Kapale did his MS in Physics from Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay (now Mumbai). He did his PhD work at Texas A&M University in the area of theoretical quantum optics. After spending a semester at Princeton University he moved to Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology as a National Research Council Research Associate and NASA Postdoctoral Fellow. He joined the WIU Department of Physics in Fall of 2007.

Nobel Series Seminar by Dr. Kapale

-------------------------