Department of Physics

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Colloquia & Seminars, Fall 2012

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WIU Physics Department Lecture Series on Nobel Prizes

Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics:Control of the light matter interaction at the single atom and single photon level

Speaker: Dr. Kishor T. Kapale
Date: Friday, November 30, 2012
Time: 4 p.m.
Room: 205 Currens Hall

Abstract: The Nobel Prize in Physics 2012 was awarded jointly to Serge Haroche and David J. Wineland "for ground-breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems.

About the speaker: Professor Kishor Kapale is a physics professor from the Department of Physics, Western Illinois University. Professor Kapale is a theoretical physicist whose research focuses on quantum optics, atomic optics, quantum information theory and applied quantum physics.

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Insights into the thrombogenicity of Factor IXa: trace amounts of Factor IXa promote growth of clot size

Speaker: Dr. Naveen Jha
Date: Friday, November 9, 2012
Time: 4 p.m.
Room: 205 Currens Hall

Abstract: Contamination of FIX with FIXa has been proposed to explain thrombotic adverse events in treated hemophilia B patients. The thrombogenic role of FIXa can be related to its slow inhibition in plasma. However, it remains unknown how FIXa exerts its thrombogenic effect. Here we used in vitro clot growth video-microscopy to investigate possible mechanisms of FIXa-mediated thrombogenicity. Human FIX deficient plasma was re-calcified and mixed with low-melting agarose to create a thin layer of plasma-gel, which on activation with TF-bearing lipid vesicle forms dose dependent clot size (not bigger than 1mm even with high TF concentration). On the other hand, the diffusion into the plasma gel of FXa or FIXa with a very small amount of TF induced dose-dependent initial clot growth followed by early termination of clot formation. Finally, FIXa premixed/activated with TF,TF-driven clot growth was followed by a steady-state large clot size. Steady-state rate of clot growth was directly proportional to plasma concentration of FIXa.

About the speaker: Dr. Naveen Jha is a former MS student from the department of physics, WIU. Currently, he is working as an ORISE (Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education) Fellow at the US Food and Drugs Administration laboratory in Bethesda (MD). His research interests fall into a wide variety of fields ranging from the study of blood clots to the photoluminescence of blue LED materials.

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Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) detection system for actinides at the Argonne Fragment Mass Analyzer

Speaker: Dr. Chithra Nair
Date: Friday, November 2
Time: 4 p.m.
Room: 205 Currens Hall

Abstract: The AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) project at ATLAS (Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System) complements the MANTRA (Measurement of Actinides Neutron TRAnsmutation) experimental campaign. The principal aim of this work is to obtain valuable integral information on the neutron cross sections of very high mass actinides that are of importance for Advanced Nuclear Fuel cycles (AFC). The irradiated samples from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory are studied via AMS at Argonne National Laboratory. The different actinides that are built up during the irradiation at ATR can be accurately measured to high levels of sensitivity using AMS. The ATLAS AMS is based on the production of highly-charged positive ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) followed by linear acceleration and separation by electromagnetic means. The ions are further separated and mass (A) identified in a fragment mass analyzer (FMA) system. For unique Z identification and discrimination from a stable isobar that interferes with detection of the ion type of interest, dE/dx measurements are made using highly sophisticated detectors. The project progress as well as results from the first test run will be discussed

About the speaker: Dr. Chithra Nair is a post-doctoral researcher at the Argonne National Laboratories. She is a nuclear Physicist, with research expertise in Nuclear Astrophysics and Structure Physics. Medical Isotope production is one of her strong research interests. She has been performing ATLAS experiments at the Argonne National Laboratory for the past 2.5 years.

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Carbon Capture and Sequestration through Advanced Nanostructured Materials

Speaker: Dr. Jacob Burress
Date:Friday, October 19, 2012
Time: 4 p.m.
Room: 205 Currens Hall

Abstract: One promising avenue of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) research is the use of adsorbent-based storage materials. A better understanding of the physical behavior of adsorbed carbon dioxide can lead to significant advances in the field of energy research. The focus of this presentation is functionalized carbon nanomaterials, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), and hybrid carbon-MOF systems (e.g. graphene oxide frameworks). These materials present attractive characteristics for optimization of carbon capture including high surface area, tunable pore structure, inexpensive synthesis, and structural stability. However, to meet the requirements for practical carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, CCS materials need to be optimized. CO2 capture is unique because these materials (i) must possess excellent characteristics of good physisorption materials, (ii) have high selectivities for CO2 over other gases and (iii) be adjusted for specific technologies depending upon the application. Advanced neutron scattering techniques can characterize the samples and captured CO2, e.g. for crystalline materials, neutron powder diffraction with in-situ CO2 sorption can determine binding sites.

About the speaker: Dr. Jacob Burress is an undergraduate alumnus of the Department of Physics, WIU. He currently works as a Research Assistant Professor at the Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Missouri. He is an applied researcher in the areas of hydrogen and methane storage, carbon capture, and energy-related materials development. This research has included design, synthesis, and characterization of engineered nanospace materials. Areas of characterization focus include neutron scattering and gas sorption studies.

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Physics Matters, Project Management too

Speaker: Akinloluwa T Olumoroti
Date: Friday, September 14, 2012
Time: 4 p.m.
Room: 205 Currens Hall

Abstract: Physics is cool because it teaches us so much about the world around us. Physics and Project Management don't seem to have much in common but, in this presentation, I hope to use some physics concepts I learned to explain fundamental theories of project management, branding, marketing and even love. Finally, I make a case for why project management is cool too.

About the speaker: Akinloluwa Olumoroti is a Physics graduate student at Western Illinois University in his third semester.

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